whiskeys

Let de Vere's Irish Pub be your Sacramento Whiskey Bar

If you’re looking for a Sacramento Whiskey Bar, look no further than de Vere’s Irish Pub! Our growing collection of whiskys include many rare and allocated whiskeys that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Wednesdays are a perfect time to explore our Whiskey Wall.

After 7pm each Wednesday ALL of our whiskeys are 50% off! We want you to come in and treat yourself to a pour from that bottle you’ve been meaning to try. At half off, there’s never been a better time to grab a friend and head down to the pub to go on a whiskey adventure.

Our extensive whisky list includes Irish, Tennessee, Japanese whiskeys.Scotch, bourbons and ryes available as single pours or as part of our Whiskey Flights. Check out our whiskey library online for a list or stop by the pub to see our latest offerings.

You can enjoy our Whiskey Wednesday savings at both our Sacramento and Davis pubs!

Sacramento Whiskey Bar

Michter's US 1 Bourbon Review

Michter’s US 1 Four Stars/Highly Recommended F. Paul Pacult's Spirit Journal: "The rich bronze color sparkles under the lamp; perfect purity. The initial whiffs uncover dry notes of stone-milled grist and dried fruit; following the aeration stage, the bouquet offers peppery/spicy scents that accent the dry graininess. The palate entry is surprisingly sweet and corny, considering how dry the aroma is; the midpalate point is deep, corny sweet, sap-like and a bit syrupy. Ends up well and balanced, with a backnote of dried red fruit (raisins, prunes). A handsome addition to this series."

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

 

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

 

 

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Sazerac & old Rip Van Winkle

Rip Van Winkle 13yr Deep tawny copper. Powerful caramel, spice, sweet tobacco, and estery aromas jump from the glass. A smooth, broad entry leads to a medium-to full-bodied palate with sweet toffee, roasted nut, and leather notes. Finishes with a wave of white pepper, spice, and long-lingering dried fruit flavors. A profoundly rich and oaky rye whiskey.

Sazerac 6yr

Buffalo Trace’s Sazerac is big and spicy on the nose, with molasses, sultanas, vanilla and lanolin. Mouth – and glass! – coating, intense and oily rye, with dry spices and a hint of liquorice. Becoming sweeter, with developing ripe bananas. The finish is long, with a sprinkling of pepper, lightly oaky and determinedly dry. A lovely, complex and confident example of America’s true Classic whiskey style. Good to see rye undergoing a modest revival, and spirit as good as this can only help the cause 90.0% ABV

Sazarac –Thomas Handy

Thomas H. Handy Sazerac is the newest addition to the Buffalo Trace Antique Collection. It is an uncut and unfiltered straight rye whiskey, named after the New Orleans bartender who first used rye whiskey to make the Sazerac Cocktail. According to the distillers, “The barrels were aged six years and five months on the fifth floor of Warehouse M. It’s very flavourful and will remind drinkers of Christmas cake.” Summer fruits and pepper notes on the nose. The palate is a lovely blend of soft vanilla and peppery rye, while the finish is long and comforting with oily, spicy oak. 63.8% ABV,

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey’s at a discount!

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Booker’s Whiskey Notes

Booker’s "Booker'sBottled By: James B. Beam Distilling Co. Clermont,KY

TypeKentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Alcohol content125.6 Proof

Availability US: Available Japan: Available Duty Free: Unknown Europe: Available

History: In 1988, Booker Noe introduced his own signature bourbon, Booker's True Barrel Bourbon. Inspired by a 200-year-old tradition, Booker's is the only bourbon bottled straight-from-the-barrel, uncut and unfiltered. First created as a holiday gift for his special friends, Booker's whiskey was so well-received that he decided to make it available to bourbon lovers worldwide; much to the joy of spirit connoisseurs everywhere. Booker's is the rarest, absolute best bourbon available.

Distinctions:

Booker’s Bourbon is the only uncut, unfiltered, straight-from-the-barrel, connoisseur’s sipping bourbon available today. It’s bottled at its natural proof of between 121 and 127, and aged between six and eight years. Booker Noe, Jim Beam’s grandson and master distiller emeritus, hand selects each barrel that will become Booker’s Bourbon. Each barrel that will become Booker’s bourbon is aged in the very center of the rackhouse where the temperature and humidity combines in the perfect proportion for the finest bourbon. This is truly the absolute best bourbon available. Tasting Notes Age: 6 to 8 years Proof: 121 to 127 Color: Deep, rich, smoky amber Aroma: Big oak, vanilla, smoky charcoal Taste: Intense, fruit, tannin, tobacco Finish: Clean, long, intense Award: Gold Medal Bourbon - Wine Enthusiast Comments: “A tasting of Small Batch Bourbons left me in awe of Booker’s.” – The Chicago Tribune”

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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Paddy & Rebreast Irish whiskey

Paddy

Nose: Very linseedy, flowery and appetizing. Palate: Smooth, perfumy. Finish: Mustard. Comment: A classic Irish, though less full in flavour than Jameson.

Nose: Grainy from the off, but just a little more pot still sturdiness than of yore. A touch fruity but overall quite uninspiring. Palate: Much more toffee-vanilla than in recent years; enormously soft and completely lacking richness.

Finish: Dries as the oak takes over; becomes even bitter. Comment:  An unwieldy blend which disappoints thanks to its refusal to offer anything but a grainy, almost metallic hardness against an uncomplex softness.

RedBreast 12yr

There was a time when all Irish whiskeys were ‘pure pot still,’ made with a mixture of malted and unmalted barley, but today Redbreast is a rare survivor of the genre. As such it would be something to cherish even if it were not as excellent as it is. Redbreast dates back to the early 20th century, when the bonding company Gilbey’s of Ireland used the name for Jameson spirit which they matured and bottled, but since the 1990s the brand has been owned by Jameson’s parent company, Irish Distillers Ltd. Redbreast 12-year-old is distilled in Irish Distillers’ vast Midleton complex in County Cork, and maturation takes place principally in former Sherry casks, along with a percentage of ex-Bourbon wood. The result is a robust and deliciously individualistic whiskey, which offers a nose of linseed oil, mixed fruit, Sherry and vanilla. Big and voluptuous in the mouth, with characteristic Irish oiliness, cooked fruits, ginger and a developing nuttiness as it dries gently in a lengthy and well-mannered finish. A classic. 40.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

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Connemara A Peated Irish Whiskey

Connemara Nose: Wonderfully peaty and smoky. Palate: Smooth, oily. Sweet, perfumy, smoke. Finish: Smoky. Sweet grass. Comment: The revival of rustic peatiness adds a whole new element to today’s palette of Irish whiskey flavours.

Nose: Sweet, clean peat, vanilla and-floral notes. One of the most profound and complex of Irish noses. Palate: Again very sweet, peaty. Softly honeyed and oily Mild molasses, fabulously smoky. Finish: Becomes drier as some oak bites, but the peat just keeps on rumbling along. Comment: This single malt had suffered from an identity crisis over the last year or so. Some vattings had become slightly off-key, dirty even, and the malt had lost direction. This bottling, however, is back to its brilliant best.

Connemara Cask

Nose: Liniment and farmyard. Palate: Honey on hot porridge, before a mushroom cloud of peat blows your head off. Finish: A rollercoaster ride of pepper, huge amounts of billowing smoke, then vanilla, mint and choc fudge. Comment: I just love this un-chill filtered version; it's fat, it's loud and it's fun. In this price bracket, there are very few Scottish single malts that can match it.

Nose: Muted nose before vanilla, nuts, violet and a mix of estery notes and perfumed peat smoke. Kippers. Palate: A very sweet start, lemon barley water, then the smoke builds in intensity, perfumed, touch of sheepskin. Good intensity. Finish: Long, smoky. Slightly hot. . Comment: Not surprisingly the punchiest and the peatiest of these two

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

A Review of Bushmills Whiskey's

Bushmills

Rich and concentrated, the first impression is of the sweetness. There are hints of honey, spice and chocolate, so greater complexity is revealed under the initial, very slightly cloying, first layer. It’s more intense than the signature Bushmills but a family resemblance can be clearly detected. Again, the initial impact on the palate is smooth sweetness, as this rich whiskey rolls around the mouth. There are toffee and dark caramel notes here, mingling with spicy hints that open up with a dash of water. Hints of fruit also appear after a while. The toffee develops to a dark chocolate on a lingering finish that holds together well. I've rated this 3.5 stars, but if you’re a fan of Bushmills it's worth 4, because you’ll probably love this! 46.0% ABV,

Bushmills Black

Bushmills distillery in County Antrim is currently celebrating the 400 anniversary of a licence being granted to distil in the area, so it is fitting that July’s Whisky of the Month is Black Bush. Bushmills is owned by Diageo and triple distils malt whiskey, which is mixed with grain spirit from Midleton distillery in County Cork to create the Bushmills family of blended Irish whiskeys. Black Bush contains a significantly higher proportion of malt than the popular ‘Original’ brand, and also benefits from the fact that the malt component is matured for between eight and ten years in ex-Oloroso Sherry casks prior to blending. Rich and enticing on the nose, with sweet Sherry, characteristic Irish whiskey oiliness, honey and blackcurrants. The palate is a complex blend of sweet and more austere, slightly metallic, notes; Sherry, Fry’s Turkish Delight, autumn berries and restrained cinnamon spice. Water teases out more Irish oil. The finish offers an initial fudge note that dries slowly and elegantly through treacle toffee to pleasing oak. Undoubtedly one of the world’s great blended whiskeys. 40.0% ABV

Bushmills 10yr

Nose: Distinctly almondy. Some soft, perfumy, winey spiciness. Palate: Toasted almonds, raisins, slightly burnt toffee. Finish: Delicate, elusive, flavours. Long, soft, soothing. Comment: All the woods are influential, especially the port in the finish. A very dexterous balancing act, but is the house character eventually overwhelmed

Nose: Intense malt with a unmistakable sherry richness. Quite firm, fruity and clean. Palate:Sweet, quite lush start: malt, sherry and soft spice. Finish: Lashings of toffee with bigger sherry than of old. Dark fudge sweetness gives way to much drier cocoa notes. Comment: A bigger whisky than of a year or two back with the sherry making a much bigger impression. Quite fruity and full where once it was slightly powdery and over-dependent on the malt character alone.

 

Bushmills 16yr

Nose: Distinctly nutty, but also with those linseedy Irish flavours. some soft, perfumy, spiciness. Palate: Toasted almonds, raisin, slightly burnt toffee. Finish: Delicate, elusive, flavours. Long, soft, soothing. Comment: All the woods are influential, especially the port in the finish. A dextrous balancing act.

Nose: Beautifully scented with honey, sweet apples, pears, bananas and sherry. Palate: Delicious, malt roundedness, rich fruit and nuttiness peep through the sherry and port structure. Finish: Lingering sweet fruit salad character and the lightest trace of peat. Comment: Absolutely charming Bushmills. Expertly composed.

 

Bushmills 21yr

Nose: Pronounced Madeira ' toffee' character. Palate: Smooth, sweet, succulent. Marzipan. Glazed almonds. Finish: Dusting of ginger. Comment: A delicious whisky. The sweetness and nuttiness of Bushmills whiskey and of Madeira are an enjoyable double-act. The whiskey has to work hard to avoid being upstaged

Nose: A lifted, perfumed fruit-filled nose, soft and pulpy, apricot yoghurt and crannachan (raspberry oats sugar and cream). Palate: Starts sweet, soft and juicy starting with apricot ending up with redcurrant and cherry. Finish: A very light smokiness. Comment: Lovely balance. A whisky for those who like things on the fruity side.

 

 

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

BloomsDay is Here!

Bloomsday performers outside Davy Byrne's pub

A few facts about Bloomsday for anyone who wants to come down to the pub and raise a pint or two!

Bloomsday is a commemoration observed annually on June 16th in Dublin and elsewhere to celebrate the life of Irish writer James Joyce and relive the events in his novel Ulysses, all of which took place on the same day in Dublin in 1904. Joyce chose the date because his first outing with his wife-to-be, Nora Barnacle happened on that day, when they walked to the Dublin urban village ofRingsend. The name derives from Leopold Bloom, the protagonist of Ulysses.

Bloomsday activities

Street party in North Great George's Street, 2004

The day involves a range of cultural activities including Ulysses readings and dramatisations, pub crawls and general merriment, much of it hosted by the James Joyce Centre in North Great George's Street. Enthusiasts often dress in Edwardian costume to celebrate Bloomsday, and retrace Bloom's route around Dublin via landmarks such as Davy Byrne's pub. Hard-core devotees have even been known to hold marathon readings of the entire novel, some lasting up to 36 hours. The first celebration took place in 1954, and a major five-month-long festival (ReJoyce Dublin 2004) took place in Dublin between 1 April and 31 August 2004. On the Sunday in 2004 before the 100th "anniversary" of the fictional events described in the book, 10,000 people in Dublin were treated to a free, open-air, full Irish breakfast on O'Connell Street consisting of sausagesrasherstoastbeans, and black and white puddings.

On Bloomsday 1982, the centenary year of Joyce's birth, Irish state broadcaster, RTÉ, transmitted a continuous 30-hour dramatic performance of the entire text of Ulysses on radio.

The Rosenbach Museum & Library in Philadelphia is the home of the handwritten manuscript ofUlysses and celebrates Bloomsday with a street festival including readings, Irish music, and traditional Irish cuisine provided by local Irish-themed pubs.

The Syracuse James Joyce Club holds an annual Bloomsday celebration at Johnston's BallyBay Pub in Syracuse, New York, at which large portions of the book are either read aloud, or presented as dramatizations by costumed performers. The club awards scholarships and other prizes to students who have written essays on Joyce or fiction pertaining to his work. The city is home to Syracuse University, whose press has published or reprinted several volumes of Joyce studies.

 

Reading from Ulysses on top of James Joyce Tower and Museum, June 2009

In 2004 Vintage Publishers issued yes I said yes I will Yes: A Celebration of James Joyce, Ulysses, and 100 Years of Bloomsday, edited by Nola Tully. It is one of the few monographs that details the increasing popularity of Bloomsday. The book's title comes from the novel's famous last lines.

Bloomsday has also been celebrated since 1994 in the Hungarian town of Szombathely, the fictional birthplace of Leopold Bloom's father, Virág Rudolf, an emigrant Hungarian Jew. The event is usually centered around the Iseum, the remnants of an Isis temple from Roman times, and the Blum-mansion, commemorated to Joyce since 1997, at 40–41 Fő street, which used to be the property of an actual Jewish family called Blum. Hungarian author László Najmányi in his 2007 novel, The Mystery of the Blum-mansion (A Blum-ház rejtélye) describes the results of his research on the connection between Joyce and the Blum family.

There have been many Bloomsday events in Trieste, where the first part of Ulysses was written; a Joyce Museum was opened there on 16 June 2004. Since 2005 Bloomsday has been celebrated every year in Genoa, with a reading of Ulysses in Italian by volunteers (students, actors, teachers, scholars), starting at 9 A.M. and finishing in the early hours of 17 June; the readings take place in 18 different places in the old town centre, one for each chapter of the novel, and these places are selected for their resemblance to the original settings. Thus for example chapter 1 is read in a medieval tower, chapter 2 in a classroom of the Faculty of Languages, chapter 3 in a bookshop on the waterfront, chapter 9 in the University Library, and chapter 12 ("Cyclops") in an old pub. The Genoa Bloomsday is organized by the Faculty of Languages and the International Genoa Poetry Festival.

New York City has several events on Bloomsday including formal readings at Symphony Space and informal readings and music at the downtown Ulysses' Folk House pub.[1]

First Bloomsday Celebration

 

First bloom:John RyanAnthony Cronin,Brian O'NolanPatrick Kavanagh & Tom Joyce (James Joyce's cousin); Sandymount, 1954

Bloomsday (a term Joyce himself did not employ) was invented in 1954, on the 50th anniversary of the events in the novel, when John Ryan (artist, critic, publican and founder of Envoy magazine) and the novelist Flann O'Brienorganised what was to be a daylong pilgrimage along the Ulysses route. They were joined by Patrick Kavanagh,Anthony Cronin, Tom Joyce (a dentist who, as Joyce's cousin, represented the family interest) and AJ Leventhal (Registrar of Trinity College). Ryan had engaged two horse drawn cabs, of the old-fashioned kind, which in Ulysses Mr. Bloom and his friends drive to poor Paddy Dignam's funeral. The party were assigned roles from the novel. They planned to travel round the city through the day, visiting in turn the scenes of the novel, ending at night in what had once been the brothel quarter of the city, the area which Joyce had called Nighttown. The pilgrimage was abandoned halfway through, when the weary Lestrygonians succumbed to inebriation and rancour at the Bailey pub in the city centre, which Ryan then owned, and at which, in 1967, he installed the door to No. 7 Eccles Street (Leopold Bloom’s front door) having rescued it from demolition . A Bloomsday record of 1954, informally filmed by John Ryan, follows this pilgrimage.[2]

Popular culture references

In 1956, Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath were married by special licence of the Archbishop of Canterbury at St George the Martyr Church, Holborn, on 16 June, in honour of Bloomsday.[3]

Jefferson Airplane's 1967 album After Bathing at Baxter's contains the track, "Rejoyce", inspired by Joyce's Ulysses.

In Mel Brooks' 1968 film The ProducersGene Wilder's character is called Leo Bloom, an homage to Joyce's character. In the musical 2005 version, in the evening scene at the Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, Leo asks, "When will it be Bloom's day?". However, in the earlier scene in which Bloom first meets Max Bialystock, the office wall calendar shows that the current day is 16 June, indicating that it is, in fact, Bloomsday.

Punk band Minutemen have a song on their 1984 Double Nickels on the Dime album entitled "June 16th".

Richard Linklater references Ulysses in two of his films. Once in 1991's Slacker, where a character reads an excerpt from Ulysses after convincing his friends to dump a tent and a typewriter in a river as a response to a prior lover's infidelity. And again in 1995's Before Sunrise, where the events take place on 16 June.

In 2009 an episode of the cartoon The Simpsons, "In the Name of the Grandfather", featured the family's trip to Dublin and Lisa's reference to Bloomsday.

Pat Conroy's 2009 novel "South of Broad" has numerous references to Bloomsday. From the publisher's blurb: "Against the sumptuous backdrop of Charleston, South Carolina, South of Broad gathers a unique cast of sinners and saints. Leopold Bloom King, our narrator, is the son of an amiable, loving father who teaches science at the local high school. His mother, an ex-nun, is the high school principal and a well-known Joyce scholar. ..." The book's first chapter describes the events of 16 June 1969 in Leo's story.

U2's 2009 song "Breathe" refers to events taking place on a fictitious 16 June.

 

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John Powers Irish whiskey

John Powers

Triple distilled and matured in oak casks, Powers Gold Label has a spicy, honeyed, full-bodied flavour. Enjoy it neat, with water or with your favourite mixer.

This is one of the most popular whiskey’s in Ireland, drank more than Jamesons.

Make note that there is 3 swallows around the neck of the bottle, this is to remind you that all good Irish whiskeys should be drank in three swallows.  See more in distillery section.

John Powers 12yr

After being around for about a decade, it’s nice to see this whiskey finally being sold in the U.S. Soft, sweet and silky smooth, with creamy vanilla, caramel, toasted marshmallow, and honey-kissed tropical fruit (mango, pineapple, coconut). I get most of the barley on the front of the palate, with the grain whiskey components more on the finish. Something seems slightly missing for me to elevate this whiskey to classic status (some more pot still character, perhaps?), but it’s still a wonderful blended Irish whiskey. And it’s so drinkable. Gather a bunch of friends and throw away the cork!

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

A Review of the Jameson Whiskey Family Line Up

Jameson

Nose: Very aromatic. Waxy orange skins. Linseed oil. Leather. Palate: Big, oily, creamy, sociable. Finish: Delicate. Peppery. More-ish. Comment: A superb Irish for everyday drinking. I love this, though not quite as much as the Gold.

Nose: A meeting of oloroso and crisp pot still character. Malty, too. Lovely fruitcake richness, though not as sweet as in recent years. Palate: Very firm, oily, intense and mouthfilling. Finish: A hint of spice counters an increasing oaky bitterness though the barley and sherry last to the very end. Comment: Five or six years back I panned this whiskey: it was lacking in pot still character. Not any more. Now genuinely impressive, charming and characterfull

 

Jameson 12yr

Nose: Leather handbags, new car smell. Seville oranges and dusk in Valencia. Palate: I have died and gone to heaven. Warm oily spice, cardamom, cinnamon and some damn fine sherry notes. Finish: Rumbles on for ages. Tickling pepper and milk chocolate. Comment: For the money, this is the best damn blend you will ever, ever taste.

Nose: Lush and rich. Some oily pot still notes. Ripe fruit, melon, spices, oak notes, charcoal, some raisin/sultana. With water: cocoa butter, tea cake. Palate: Clean and slightly malty start. Stretches across the palate. Semi-dried peach softness, crisp cereal/oak. Balanced, honeyed and soft.

Finish: Herbal. Comment: Much more like it. Has the rich velvety juicy fruitiness of good Irish.

Jameson Gold

Nose: Light. Fresh wood. Vanilla. Distinctly buttery. Palate: Creamy. Vanilla. Fresh apple. Honey. Finish: Lightly toasty. Fresh-cut cedar. Comment: There is some virgin oak in this one, along with bourbon casks. Bonus points for trying something new, but would have expected more interesting results. I find it a bit light tasting. Try it with fresh brown bread and Dublin Bay prawns.

Nose: Layered elements of soft honey and subtle oak criss-crossing the crisp pot-still. Palate: Truly magnificent honey-barley notes. Finish: Silky and subtle, an essay in bittersweet balance with the final, drier bitter notes reminding you of some decent age. Comment: No two vattings are ever the same. However, astonishingly high quality every time. The most complex Irish of them all; a blenders triumph.

Jameson 18yr

Nose: Fresh, clean linen. Alder. Bath oil. Palate: Firm. Oiled wood. Out of the sauna to a cup of tea. Quite strong flavours. Aromatic and refreshing. Finish: Gunpowder tea. A minor explosion. Comment: Robustly sexy. I always enjoy Jameson, but I really relished coming to grips with this one.

Nose: Soft, rich, juicy: apricot, dried fruits, orange, butterscotch, hazelnut butter. Water brings out sherry, becoming chocolate and bourbon biscuit. Palate: A luscious, oily sweetness with a crisp solidity on the palate, then a burst of dried fruits, spices and citrus fruits. Finish: Rich, soft honeyed. Comment: I could drink this all day. A classic Irish whiskey.

 

Jameson 21yr

Eye: Amber, dark

Nose:  Citrus, overripe autumn fruit, honey, fudge and mildly spicy, and it must be said that they all comes together rather beautifully.

Taste: Very smooth indeed, with hints of leather, vanilla fudge, nuts – and there is no hiding that it has spent some time in a sherry cask; overall very well balanced with a nice, rounded, sweet aftertaste that lingers pleasantly in your mouth.

Jameson Vintage

The Pernod Ricard-owned Jameson brand is the world’s best-selling Irish whiskey, and is produced in the company’s extremely versatile distillery at Midleton in County Cork, which dates from 1974. There an array of pot and column stills produce spirit that is blended together in bewildering and classified combinations and proportions for the various expressions that make up the Jameson range, and many other brands besides. The latest addition to Jameson’s line up of ‘Reserve’ whiskeys, Vintage Reserve, takes to the shelves alongside Jameson 12 Year Old Special, Jameson Gold and Jameson 18 Year Old Limited Reserve. The four Reserve expressions are all matured in a mixture of ex-Bourbon and ex-Oloroso Sherry casks, and combine triple-distilled pot and column still spirit. Vintage Reserve contains some of the rarest whiskeys available from Midleton, and one of the component pot stills whiskeys has been matured in port pipes. The oldest element of Vintage Reserve is the grain, some of which is up to 25 years old, and all of the Bourbon casks used are second-fill. Light, floral honey notes from the aged grain component are present on the early nose, along with fleshy peaches and melons. The port casks contribute rich, fruity characteristics, which are sufficiently subtle not to dominate. Barley lingers in the nostrils. The sweet, mellow palate offers bananas and plums, along with developing cinnamon, toasted oak and dairy fudge notes. The finish is long, with sweet fruits, port, spice and a hint of barley. By no means cheap, but this is a confident, sophisticated and beautifully integrated whiskey that has all the makings of an Irish classic. 46.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

 

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try these Whiskeys at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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The World Of Whiskey According to Wikipedia

Whiskey

"Whisky or whiskey is a type of alcoholic beverage distilled from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat, and maize (corn). Whisky is aged in wooden casks, made generally of white oak, except that in the United States corn whiskey need not be aged.

Whisky is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many competing denominations of origin and many classes and types. The unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation to less than 95% alcohol, and aging in wood.

Etymology:

Whisky is a shortened form of usquebaugh, which English borrowed from Gaelic (Irish uisce beatha and Scottish uisge beatha). This compound descends from Old Irish uisce, "water", and bethad, "of life" and meaning literally "water of life". It meant the same thing as the Latin aqua vītae which had been applied to distilled drinks since early 14th century. Other early spellings include usquebea (1706) and iskie bae (1583). In the Irish Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1405, the first written record of whiskey appears describing the death of a chieftain at Christmas from "taking a surfeit of aqua vitae". In Scotland, the first evidence of whisky production comes from an entry in the Exchequer Rolls for 1494 where malt is sent "To Friar John Cor, by order of the king, to make aquavitae".

History:

The art of distillation began with the Babylonians in Mesopotamia (in what is now Iraq) from at least the 2nd millennium BC, with perfumes and aromatics being distilled long before potable spirits. It is possible that the art of distillation was brought from the Mediterranean regions to Ireland by Irish missionaries between the 6th century and 7th century. Distillation was brought from Africa to Europe by the Moors, and its use spread through the monasteries,  largely for medicinal purposes, such as the treatment of colic, palsy, and smallpox.

Between 1100 and 1300, distillation spread to Ireland and Scotland, with monastic distilleries existing in Ireland in the 12th century. Since Britain had few grapes with which to make wine, barley beer was used instead, resulting in the development of whisky.  In 1494, as noted above, Scotland’s Exchequer granted the malt to Friar John Cor; this was enough malt to make about 1500 bottles, so the business was apparently thriving by that time.

King James IV of Scotland (r. 1488-1513) reportedly had a great liking for Scotch whisky, and in 1506 the town of Dundee purchased a large amount of Scotch from the Guild of Surgeon Barbers, which held the monopoly on production at the time. Between 1536 and 1541, King Henry VIII of England dissolved the monasteries, sending their monks out into the general public. Whisky production moved out of a monastic setting and into personal homes and farms as newly-independent monks needed to find a way to earn money for themselves.

The distillation process at the time was still in its infancy; whisky itself was imbibed at a very young age, and as a result tasted very raw and brutal compared to today’s versions. Renaissance-era whisky was also very potent and not diluted, and could even be dangerous at times. Over time, and with the happy accident of someone daring to drink from a cask which had been forgotten for several years, whisky evolved into a much smoother drink. In 1707, the Acts of Union merged England and Scotland, and thereafter taxes on it rose dramatically.[8]

After the English Malt Tax of 1725, most of Scotland’s distillation was either shut down or forced underground. Scotch whisky was hidden under altars, in coffins, and in any available space to avoid the governmental Excisemen.  Scottish distillers, operating out of homemade stills, took to distilling their whisky at night, where the darkness would hide the smoke rising from the stills. For this reason, the drink was known as moonshine.  At one point, it was estimated that over half of Scotland’s whisky output was illegal.

In America, whisky was used as currency during the American Revolution. It also was a highly coveted sundry and when an additional excise tax was levied against it, the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion took place.[7]

In 1823, the UK passed the Excise Act, legalising the distillation (for a fee), and this put a practical end to the large-scale production of Scottish moonshine.[

In 1831, Aeneas Coffey invented the Coffey still, allowing for cheaper and more efficient distillation of whisky. In 1850, Andrew Usher mixed traditional whisky with that from the new Coffey still, and in doing so created the first Scottish blended whisky. This new grain whisky was scoffed at by Irish distillers, who clung to their malt whisky. Many Irish contended that the new mixture was, in fact, not whisky at all.[3]

By the 1880s, the French brandy industry was devastated by the phylloxera pest that ruined much of the grape crop; as a result, whisky became the primary liquor in many markets. Types:

Copper Pot stills at Auchentoshan Distillery in Scotland

Whisky or whisky-like products are produced in most grain-growing areas. They differ in base product, alcoholic content, and quality.

Malted barley is an ingredient of some whiskies.

  • Malt is whisky made entirely from malted barley and distilled in an onion-shaped pot still.
  • Grain is made from malted and unmalted barley along with other grains, usually in a continuous "patent" or "Coffey" still. Until recently it was only used in blends, but there are now some single grain scotches being marketed.

Malts and grains are combined in various ways

  • Vatted malt is blended from malt whiskies from different distilleries. If a whisky is labelled "pure malt" or just "malt" it is almost certain to be a vatted whisky. This is also sometimes labelled as "blended malt" whisky.
  • Single malt whisky is malt whisky from a single distillery. However, unless the whisky is described as "single-cask" it will contain whisky from many casks, and different years, so the blender can achieve a taste recognisable as typical of the distillery. In most cases, the name of a single malt will be that of the distillery (The Glenlivet, Bushmills, Yoichi), with an age statement and perhaps some indication of some special treatments such as maturation in a port wine cask.
  • Pure pot still whiskey refers to a whiskey distilled in a pot-still (like single malt) from a mash of mixed malted and unmalted barley. It is exclusive to Ireland.
  • Malted barley is an ingredient of some whiskies.

    Blended whiskies are made from a mixture of malt and grain whiskies. A whisky simply described as Scotch Whisky or Irish Whiskey is most likely to be a blend in this sense. A blend is usually from many distilleries so that the blender can produce a flavour consistent with the brand, and the brand name (e.g., Chivas Regal, Canadian Club) will usually not therefore contain the name of a distillery. Jameson Irish Whiskey is an exception and comes from only one distillery. However, "blend" can (less frequently) have other meanings. A mixture of malts (with no grain) from different distilleries (more usually called a vatted malt) may sometimes be referred to as a "blended malt", and a mixture of grain whiskies with no malts will sometimes carry the designation "blended grain".

  • Cask strength whiskies are rare and usually only the very best whiskies are bottled in this way. They are usually bottled from the cask undiluted. Rather than diluting, the distiller is inviting the drinker to dilute to the level of potency most palatable (often no dilution is necessary, such is the quality of single cask whiskies). Single cask whiskies are usually bottled by specialist independent bottlers, such as Duncan Taylor, Master of Malt, Gordon & MacPhail and Cadenhead amongst others.

Whiskies do not mature in the bottle, only in the cask, so the "age" of a whisky is the time between distillation and bottling. This reflects how much the cask has interacted with the whisky, changing its chemical makeup and taste. Whiskies which have been in bottle for many years may have a rarity value, but are not "older" and will not necessarily be "better" than a more recently made whisky matured in wood for a similar time. Most whiskies are sold at or near an alcoholic strength of 40% abv.

American whiskeys:

American whiskey is distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain. It must have the taste, aroma, and other characteristics commonly attributed to whiskey.

The types listed in the federal regulations are:

  • Bourbon whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% corn (maize).
  • Rye whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% rye.
  • Wheat whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% wheat.
  • Malt whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted barley.
  • Rye malt whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted rye.
  • Corn whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 80% corn (maize).

These "named types" of American whiskey must be distilled to not more than 80 percent alcohol by volume. They must then be aged in charred new oak containers, except for corn whiskey. Corn whiskey does not have to be aged but, if it is aged, it must be in new un-charred oak barrels or used barrels. The ageing for corn whiskey usually is brief, e.g., six months.

If the aging for a "named type" reaches 2 years or beyond, the whiskey is then additionally designated "straight" e.g., "straight rye whiskey". "Straight whiskey" (without naming a grain) is a whiskey which has been aged in charred new oak containers for 2 years or more and distilled at not more than 80 percent alcohol by volume but is derived from less than 51% of any one grain.

American blended whiskeys combine straight whiskey with grain neutral spirits (GNS), flavourings and colourings. The percentage of GNS must be disclosed on the label and may be as much at 80% on a proof gallon basis. Blended whiskey has the same alcohol content as straight whiskey but a much milder flavour.

Important in the marketplace is Tennessee whiskey, of which Jack Daniel's is the leading example. During production it is identical to bourbon whiskey in almost every important respect including the sour mash process. The only differences is that Tennessee whiskey is filtered through sugar maple charcoal, which is claimed to remove some unpleasant flavours and odours and produce a cleaner spirit. Though not defined by Federal regulations, the Government of the United States officially recognized Tennessee whiskey as a separate style distinct from bourbon in 1941.

Templeton Rye Whisky(Templeton, Iowa)

The United States was recovering from World War I, and many farmers needed additional income to support their families and farm payments. In response to this need for revenue, a group of farmers in a small town of Templeton, Iowa began to brew and distil their own form of rye whiskey, which they named Templeton Rye. Word of the single barrel malt Templeton Rye quickly spread and eventually caught the attention of the Capone gang, who began bootlegging hundreds of kegs of Templeton Rye per month and distributing it to speakeasies throughout New York, Chicago and as far west as Denver. Legend has it that Capone even orchestrated getting Templeton Rye smuggled to him while incarcerated in Alcatraz.

Australian whiskeys:

Australia produces a number of single malt whiskies. The whiskies being produced on the island State of Tasmania in particular are receiving global attention.

Australian whiskies are winning an increasing number of global whisky awards and medals, including for example the World Whiskies Awards and Jim Murray's Whisky Bible 'Liquid Gold Awards'.

Australian distilleries include: Bakery Hill, Hellyers Road, Lark, Limeburners, Nant, Small Concern (no longer operating), Smith's (no longer operating) and Sullivan's Cove.

Canadian whiskeys:

 

Canadian whiskies are usually lighter and smoother than other whisky styles. Another common characteristic of many Canadian whiskies is their use of rye that has been malted, which provides a fuller flavour and smoothness. By Canadian law,[11] Canadian whiskies must be produced in Canada, be distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain, "be aged in small wood for not less than 3 years", and "possess the aroma, taste and character generally attributed to Canadian whisky". The terms "Canadian Whisky", "Canadian Rye Whisky" and "Rye Whisky" are legally indistinguishable in Canada and do not denote any particular proportion of rye or other grain used in production.

Finnish whiskeys:

There are two working distilleries in Finland and a third one is under construction. Whisky retail sales in Finland are controlled solely by the state alcohol monopoly Alko and advertisement of strong alcoholic beverages is banned.

German whiskeys:

The distillation of German-made whisky is a relatively recent phenomenon having only started in the last 30 years. The styles produced resemble those made in Ireland, Scotland and the United States: single malts, blends, and bourbon styles. There is no standard spelling of German whiskies with distilleries using both "whisky" and "whiskey" and one even using "whessky", a play on the word whisky and Hessen, the state in which it is produced. There are currently ten distilleries in Germany producing whisky.

Indian whiskeys:

Indian whisky is an alcoholic beverage that is labelled as "whisky" in India. Much Indian whisky is distilled from fermented molasses, and as such would be considered a sort of rum outside of the Indian subcontinent. 90% of the "whisky" consumed in India is molasses based, although India has begun to distill whisky from malt and other grains.[15]

Kasauli Distillery is set in the Himalaya mountains and opened in the late 1820s. The main whisky brand is a single malt named "Solan No. 1". This was named after the town nearby called Solan. It was the best selling Indian whisky till recently, but has declined since the early 1980s because of the stiff competition from the larger distilleries. Other whiskies this distillery produces are Diplomat Deluxe, Colonel's Special, Black Knight and Summer Hall.

Irish whiskeys:

Most Irish whiskeys are distilled three times. Though traditionally distilled using pot stills, column still are now used to produce grain whiskey for blends. By law, Irish whiskey must be produced in Ireland and aged in wooden casks for a period of no less than three years, although in practice it is usually three or four times that period.[18] Unpeated malt is almost always used, the main exception being Connemara Peated Malt whiskey.

There are several types of whiskey common to Ireland: single malt, single grain, blended whiskey and uniquely to Ireland, pure pot still whiskey. The designation "pure pot still" as used in Ireland generally refers to whiskey made of 100% barley, mixed malted and unmalted, and distilled in a pot still made of copper. The "green" unmalted barley gives the traditional pure pot still whiskey a spicy, uniquely Irish quality. Like single malt, pure pot still is sold as such or blended with grain whiskey. Usually no real distinction is made between whether a blended whiskey was made from single malt or pure pot still.

Japanese Whiskeys:

The model for Japanese whiskeys is the single malt Scotch, although there are also examples of Japanese blended whiskies. The base is a mash of malted barley, dried in kilns fired with a little peat (although considerably less than in Scotland), and distilled using the pot still method. For some time exports of Japanese whisky suffered from the belief in the West that whisky made in the Scotch style, but not produced in Scotland, was inferior, and until fairly recently, the market for Japanese whiskies was almost entirely domestic. In recent years, Japanese whiskies have won prestigious international awards and now enjoy a reputation as a quality product.

Scotch whiskeys:

Scotch whiskeys are generally distilled twice, though some are distilled a third time. International laws require anything bearing the label "Scotch" to be distilled in Scotland and matured for a minimum of three years and one day in oak casks, among other, more specific criteria. If Scotch whisky is from more than one cask, and if it includes an age statement on the bottle, it must reflect the age of the youngest whisky in the blend. Many cask-strength single malts omit the age as they use younger elements in minute amounts for flavouring and mellowing. The basic types of Scotch are malt and grain, which are combined to create blends. Many, though not all, Scotch whiskies use peat smoke to treat their malt, giving Scotch its distinctive smoky flavour. While the market is dominated by blends, the most highly prized of Scotch whiskies are the single malts. Scotch whiskies are divided into five main regions: Highland, Lowland, Islay, Speyside and Campbeltown.

Welsh Whiskeys:

In 2000, Penderyn Distillery started production of the Penderyn single malt Welsh whisky in Wales, the first Welsh whisky since all production ended in 1894. The first bottles went on sale on 1 March 2004, Saint David's Day, and the whisky is now sold throughout the world. Penderyn Distillery is situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park and is considered the smallest distillery in the world.

Other Whiskeys:

In Brittany, France, five distilleries (Distillerie des Menhirs,[24] Guillon,[25] Glann ar Mor,[26] Kaerilis[27] and Warenghem[28]) produce whisky using techniques similar to those in Scotland.

One whisky is produced on the French island of Corsica: Pietra & Mavella (P&M) is a coproduction of the brewery Pietra and the distillery Mavella. The mash is enriched with chestnut flour. P&M is matured in muscat casks (Domaine Gentile).[29][not in citation given]

Manx Spirit from the Isle of Man is, like some Virginia whiskeys in the USA, distilled elsewhere and re-distilled in the country of its nominal "origin".

In Spain there is a distillery named DYC, started in 1948.

In Sweden a new distillery (Mackmyra), started selling its products in 2006.

Recently at least two distilleries in the traditionally brandy-producing Caucasus region announced their plans to enter the Russian domestic market with whiskies. The Stavropol-based Praskoveysky distillery bases its product on Irish technology, while in Kizlyar, Dagestan's "Russian Whisky" announced a Scotch-inspired drink in single malt, blended and wheat varieties.

In Taiwan, the King Car company built a whisky distillery in the city of Yilan, and has recently begun marketing Kavalan Single Malt Whisky.

Production of whisky started in Norfolk, England in late 2006 and the first whisky (as opposed to malt spirit) was made available to the public in November 2009. This is the first English single malt in over 100 years. It was produced at St George's Distillery by the English Whisky Company.  Previously Bristol and Liverpool were centres of English whisky production. East Anglia is a source of much of the grain used in Scotch whisky.

Names and spellings:

The word "whisky" is believed to have been coined by soldiers of King Henry II who invaded Ireland in the 12th century as they struggled to pronounce the native Irish words uisce beatha [ɪʃkʲə bʲahə], meaning "water of life". Over time, the pronunciation changed from "whishkeyba" (an approximation of how the Irish term sounds) to "whisky". The name itself is a Gaelic calque of the Latin phrase aqua vitae, meaning "water of life".

Much is made of the word's two spellings, whisky and whiskey. Today, the spelling whisky (plural whiskies) is generally used for whiskies distilled in Scotland, Wales, Canada, and Japan, while whiskey (plural whiskeys) is used for the whiskeys distilled in Ireland and the United States. However, several prominent American brands, such as Maker's Mark and George Dickel, use the 'whisky' spelling. When writing generally about this type of spirit, either spelling is correct.

"Scotch" is the internationally recognized term for "Scotch whisky" however it is rarely used in Scotland, where the drink is called 'whisky.'

In many Latin-American countries, whisky (wee-skee) is used as a photographer's cue to smile, supplanting English "cheese". The Uruguayan film Whisky got its name because of this.

Chemistry:

Whiskeys and other distilled beverages such as cognac and rum are complex beverages containing a vast range of flavouring compounds, of which some 200 to 300 can be easily detected by chemical analysis. The flavoring chemicals include "carbonyl compounds, alcohols, carboxylic acids and their esters, nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds, terpenes, and oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds" and esters of fatty acids.  The nitrogen compounds include pyridines, picolines and pyrazines.

Flavours from distillation:

The flavoring of whisky is partially determined by the presence of congeners and fusel oils. Fusel oils are higher alcohols than ethanol, are mildly toxic, and have a strong, disagreeable smell and taste. An excess of fusel oils in whisky is considered a defect. A variety of methods are employed in the distillation process to remove unwanted fusel oils. Traditionally, American distillers focused on secondary filtration using charcoal, gravel, sand, or linen to remove undesired distillates. Canadian distillers have traditionally employed column stills which can be controlled to produce an almost pure (and less flavorful) ethanol known as neutral grain spirit or grain neutral spirit (GNS).  Flavor is restored by blending the neutral grain spirits with flavoring whiskies.

Acetals are rapidly formed in distillates and a great many are found in distilled beverages, the most prominent being acetaldehyde diethyl acetal (1,1-diethoxyethane). Among whiskies the highest levels are associated with malt whisky. This acetal is a principal flavour compound in sherry, and contributes fruitiness to the aroma.

The diketone diacetyl (2,3-Butanedione) has a buttery aroma and is present in almost all distilled beverages. Whiskies and cognacs typically contain more than vodkas, but significantly less than rums or brandies.[42]

Flavours from oak:

Whisky lactone (3-methyl-4-octanolide) is found in all types of oak. This lactone has a strong coconut aroma.  Whisky lactone is also known as quercus lactone.  Commercially charred oaks are rich in phenolic compounds. One study identified 40 different phenolic compounds. The coumarin scopoletin is present in whisky, with the highest level reported in Bourbon whiskey.

Bourbon

Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria."

Whiskey according to Wikipedia

Disclaimer:

This article is posted here from Wikipedia so readers of our blog can see a brief overview of whiskey without having to leave our blog.   All credit from this post goes to Wikipedia.  We just like to collect facts and tasting notes from all over the web to share with our Whiskey Society and our guests that love whiskey.  Happy reading and drinking!

You can try the Whiskeys mentioned here at  de Vere’s Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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Irish Whiskey an Overview

Irish Whiskey

 Irish whiskey:

(Irish: Fuisce or Uisce beatha) is a whiskey made in Ireland. There are several types of whiskey common to Ireland: Single Malt, Single Grain, Pure Pot Still and Blended Whiskey.

The word whiskey is an Anglicisation of the ancient Gaelic term "uisce beatha" which translates as "water of life". (The Craythur is a modern Irish term for whiskey.

Most Irish whiskey is distilled three times while Scotch, apart from Auchentoshan, is distilled twice. Peat is rarely used in the malting process, so that Irish Whiskey has a smoother finish as opposed to the smokey, earthy overtones common to some Scotches. There are notable exceptions to these "rules" in both countries; an example is Connemara Peated Irish Malt (double distilled) whiskey from the independent Cooley Distillery in Co. Louth.

Although Scotland sustains approximately 90 distilleries, Ireland has only four (although each produces a number of different whiskeys): economic difficulties in the last few centuries have led to a great number of mergers and closures. Currently those distilleries operating in Ireland are: New Midleton Distillery (Jamesons, Powers, Paddy, Midleton, Redbreast, and others, plus the independently sold rarity Green Spot), Old Bushmills Distillery (all Old Bushmills, Black Bush, 1608, Bushmills 10-, 12- and 16- and 21-year-old single malts), Cooley Distillery (Connemara, some Knappogues, (the '94 was by Bushmills) Michael Collins, Tyrconnell, and others) and the recently reopened Kilbeggan distillery, which began distilling again in 2007 and released samples of its still maturing spirit at 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years worth of aging in 2009 as "The Spirit of Kilbeggan." Only Cooley and Kilbeggan (owned by Cooley) are completely Irish-owned. Irish Distillers' Midleton distillery has been part of the Pernod-Ricard conglomerate since 1988. Bushmills was part of the Irish Distillers group from 1972 until 2005 when it was sold to Diageo.

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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Sacramento's Largest Whiskey List

We have built our whiskey list over the past two years and are adding whiskey's every week.  We will create links between this list and our reviews of each whiskey as we post them to our blog.  We hope you will enjoy our whiskey bar in the heart of downtown Sacramento.  The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub.  Grab a friend and come down for an incredible experience!

Bourbon

Bourbon is an American whiskey, like Bulliet or Maker’s Mark, made from at least 51% corn and aged at least two years in new charred oak barrels.   Bourbon that meets the above requirements, has been aged for a minimum of two years, and has no added coloring, flavoring, or other spirit may be called Straight bourbon.

Basil Hayden’s 8yr

Booker’s

Bulleit

Buffalo Trace

Eagle Rare

Eagle Rare 17yr

Four Roses

George T. Stagg

Jim Beam

Jim Beam Black

Johnny Drum 101pr

Kentucky Vintage 17yr

Kentucky Vintage 21yr

Kentucky Vintage 25yr

Knob Creek

Maker’s Mark

Maker’s 46

Michter’s US 1

Noah’s Mill

Old Bardstown Estate

Old Forester

Old Forester Birthday

Pappy Van Winkle 12yr

Pappy Van Winkle 15yr

Pappy Van Winkle 20yr

Pappy Van Winkle 23yr

Pure Kentucky XO

Rip Van Winkle 10yr 90pr

Rip Van Winkle 12yr 107pr

Rowan’s Creek 12yr

Wild Turkey 101pr

Willett Reserve

Willett Family Estate 6yr

Willett Family Estate 13yr

William Larue Weller

Woodford Reserve

Rye Whiskey

Rye whiskey is made from a mash of at least 51% rye. Other ingredients are usually corn and malted barley. It must be aged in charred, new oak barrels. Rye whiskey that has been aged for at least 2 years may be further designated as "straight".

High West Silver

High West Bourye

High West Rendezvous

High West 16yr

High West 21yr

Michter’s US 1

Michter’s 10yr

Rip Van Winkle 13yr

Sazerac 6yr

Sazarac –Thomas Handy

Whiskey

Uisce beatha is Gaelic for “water of life”. Whiskey is a distilled spirit made from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat and corn.

Crown Royal

Crown Royal Reserve

Crown Cask No. 16

Leopold’s Peach

Pendleton

Pendryn

Seagram’s 7

Tennessee Whiskey

Tennessee whiskey is different from bourbon by one key exception - it’s charcoal filtered before aging in barrels, and it has to be distilled in Tennessee.

George Dickel

Jack Daniel’s

Jack Daniel’s SB

Gentleman Jack

Irish Whiskey

Irish whiskey must be distilled and aged in the republic of Ireland or in Northern Ireland. It must be aged for at least three years in wooden casks. If the spirits comprise a blend of two or more distillates, the product is referred to as a “Blended” Irish whiskey.

Bushmills

Bushmills Black

Bushmills 10yr

Bushmills 16yr

Bushmills 21yr

Connemara

Connemara Cask

Finian’s

Jameson

Jameson 12yr

Jameson Gold

Jameson 18yr

Jameson 21yr

Jameson Vintage

John Powers

John Powers 12yr

Kilbeggan

Knappogue Castle

Michael Collins

Michael Collins SM

Midleton Rare

Paddy

Red Breast 12yr

Red Breast 15yr

Slane Castle

Tyrconnell

Tyrconnell Madera

Tyrconnell Port

Tyrconnell Sherry

Tullamore Dew

Tullamore Dew 10yr

Tullamore Dew 12yr

Scotch

Scottish whisky is aged in oak casks for at least three years. In Scotland, however, it’s just called whisky. Depending on the region, the Scotch may have different flavors - those from Islay, pronounced “eye-la,” for example, tend to have a smoky, peaty flavor. While those from Speyside, like Macallan, are known for their smooth caramel flavors.

Islay

Ardbeg 10yr

Bowmore 12yr

Bruichladdich 12yr

Bruichladdich 14yr

Caol Ila 12yr

Lagavulin 12yr

Lagavulin 16yr

Lagavulin 1993

Laphroaig 10yr

Peat Monster

Speyside

Balvenie 12yr

Balvenie 15yr

Balvenie 21yr

Craigellachie 16yr

Dewar’s White

Dewar’s 12yr

Dewar’s 18yr

Dewar’s Signature

Glenfiddich 12yr

Glenfiddich 15yr

Glenfiddich 18yr

Glenfiddich 21yr

Glenfiddich DE 102pr

Glenlivet 12yr

Glenlivet 15yr

Gelnlivet 16 Nadura

Glenlivet 18yr

Glenrothes Select Rsv.

Glenrothes 1991

Macallan 12yr

Macallan 14yr

Macallan 18yr

Macallan 21yr

Singleton 12yr

Speyburn 10yr

Island

Highland Park 12yr

Inchmurrin 12yr

Scapa 1993

Talisker 10yr

 

Lowland

Glenkinchie 12yr

J.W. Black 12yr

J.W. Blue

J.W. Gold 18yr

J.W. Green 15yr

J.W. Red

Highland

Chivas Regal 12yr

Clynelish 14yr

Dalwhinnie 15yr

Deanston 12yr

Glen Garioch 8yr

Glenmorangie 10yr

Glenmorangie 18yr

Oban 14yr

Oban 1993 DE

Stronachie 12yr

Stronachie 17yr

Campbeltown

Cadenhead’s

Springbank CV

Springbank 10yr

Springbank 15yr

Grain

Milford 10yr

Pig’s Nose 5yr

Sheeps Dip

Sheeps Dip 1990

Yamazaki 12yr

Yamazaki 18y

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try all of these Whiskeys at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

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Knob Creek Bourbon Review

 

Knob Creek

Knob Creek is the Kentucky town where Abraham Lincoln’s father, Thomas, owned a farm and worked at the local distillery. This nine-year-old Bourbon is made with the same high-rye formula as Basil Hayden’s. It has a nutty nose of sweet, tangy fruit and rye, with malt, spice and nuts on the palate, drying in the finish with notes of vanilla. 50.0% ABV

 

 

 

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

If you haven't joined our Whiskey Society you should sign up today!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

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Buffalo Trace Great Every Day Bourbon

 

 

Buffalo Trace

An aroma of gum, vanilla, mint, and molasses. Sweet, fruity and notably spicy on the palate, with emerging brown sugar and oak. Water releases intensive, fruity notes. The finish is long, spicy and comparatively dry, with developing vanilla. 45.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

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Eagle Rare Vs. Eagle Rare 17 yr

Eagle Rare Eagle Rare is 10 years old, and the Bourbon equivalent of a single cask Scotch malt whisky. Soft and delicate on the nose, with honey, leather, vanilla and mild oak. Sweet corn and stewed fruits on the palate, with spices, vanilla and developing rye notes. The finish is long and quite sweet, with a hint of ginger. 45.0% ABV,

Eagle Rare 17yr

The Eagle Rare brand was introduced in 1975 by Canadian distilling giant Joseph E Seagram & Sons Inc, and in 1989 it was acquired by the Sazerac company of New Orleans. In its present incarnation, Eagle Rare is part of Sazerac’s Buffalo Trace Antique Collection, which is updated annually. The latest variant of Eagle Rare, launched last autumn, comprises barrels that were distilled in the spring of 1991. Big and bold on the nose, with vanilla, wood adhesive and almonds, plus a whiff of leather. Very smooth on the palate, full-bodied and fruity, with rye and a hint of mint. The finish comprises vanilla fudge and a final kick of spice. *** 45.0%

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

The History of Bourbon

"Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria.

You can try a lot of the  Whiskey's in this post  at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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Bulleit

Bulleit Bulleit Bourbon is made by following the small-batch technique inspired by Augustus Bulleit over 150 years ago. Only the highest quality ingredients are used. Bulleit Bourbon’s subtlety and complexity stem from its unique blend of rye, corn and barley malt, along with special strains of yeast. Because Bulleit Bourbon is especially high in rye content, it has a bold and spicy character with a distinctively smooth, clean finish.

The hints of oak and spice, the russet color, the crisp, clean flavor that feels smooth in the throat, the notes of vanilla and honey – all add up to a bourbon that has a distinct and individual character. The complex taste of Bulleit Bourbon is something that can only be appreciated once tried.

Bulleit Bourbon is an American brand of straight bourbon whiskey characterized by its high rye content at approximately 30%, the absence of phenol and aging of at least six years.[1] The design of the flask is reminiscent of an old-fashioned brown medicine flask with raised lettering and a cork stopper. The bourbon is 45% alcohol by volume, or 90 proof in most countries, in 2008 however, in Australia, Bulleit Bourbon is now imported at 40% and bottled in the UK, rather than in the US. This change has also been marked by the label on the bottle no longer being applied diagonally, but horizontally, as pictured, and also a change in the manufacture of the actual glass bottle. The new bottle design is screw top as opposed to plastic mounted cork, and the bottle lettering is raised higher and its bottle manufacture is generally lower quality, but will only be seen in the UK bottling (40%) export markets. Bulleit sold on the UK market, presently (after this change in bottling location) is presumably also 40% alcohol by volume, not 45%.

History:

According to company lore, the first batch of Bulleit was first made in the 1800s by Augustus Bulleit, but discontinued after his death. In 1987, the great-great-grandson of the original creator, Tom Bulleit created the first modern-day batch, which was introduced to US markets in 1999, and Australia, UK and Germany in 2000.[2][3] In 1997 Bulleit was bought by Seagram, and is now distilled in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky.[4] Following an acquisition of Seagram, the Bulleit brand is now owned by Diageo.

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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A toast of whiskey

A toast of whiskey

Author: Chris Macias
Published: March 16th, 2011 02:09 PM

"A pint of Guinness sounds good for St. Patrick's Day, but this year we're ready to give a little Irish whiskey a spin. In the world of spirits, Irish whiskey's known for being exceptionally smooth compared to its counterparts around the world.

In Ireland, the majority of whiskeys are distilled three times during production, making for a clean and delicately sweet drink that goes down easy before yelling "Erin go bragh."

Whiskey's been produced in Ireland for centuries, and the country was home at one point to more than 1,000 distilleries. That number has been reduced to just a handful in Ireland today, but they still produce a range of whiskey styles from such brands as Bushmills, Jameson and Redbreast.

To get a head start on St. Patrick's Day, we're here at de Vere's Irish Pub, where the TVs broadcast a Champions League soccer match with Barcelona vs. Arsenal.

De Vere's carries 32 different Irish whiskeys, from smoky peat whiskeys to a bottle of Tyrconnell that's been aged in sherry casks. De Vere's even hosts its own whiskey society to introduce enthusiasts to the diversity found in this spirit.

"We get a lot of people who started as wine drinkers and then found something new they liked learning about," said co-owner Simon de Vere White.

"In an Irish whiskey, you'll be looking for something that's well-balanced with a little heat and some spice. It'll have less of the caramel and vanilla flavors that you'll find in American whiskey and bourbon."

So where to start with Irish whiskey? Well, make your first decision one that could save your life. If drinking away from home, designate a driver or keep a taxi service's number on hand.

St. Patrick's Day ranks as one of the most dangerous days on the road due to alcohol consumption. According to the CHP, a total of five people were killed and 142 people injured in 240 alcohol-involved collisions statewide on St. Patrick's Day in 2009 and 2010.

After you've checked this off your list, Liquid Assets recommends you check out these three Irish whiskeys on St. Patrick's Day and beyond:

Slane Castle Irish Whiskey (roughly $30 for 750 ml bottle, $7-$10 per shot at bars): De Vere White likes to start newcomers with this smooth and cask-y spirit that's been aged in American bourbon barrels. This whiskey definitely carries a little kick and a spicy finish, but paired with a smooth and balanced mouthfeel, just like a proper Irish whiskey should.

Connemara Peated Single Malt Irish Whiskey (about $40 for a 750 ml bottle in stores, $7-$10 per shot at bars): Here's a tasty example of a peated whiskey, which uses grains that have been roasted over a peat fire. The result is a smoky and earthy drink that's something like the whiskey equivalent of a fine cigar. Look for an exceptionally long finish with a bit of sweetness and spice mixed in with that smoky character.

Redbreast 12-year-old Pure Pot Still Irish Whiskey (roughly $40 per 750 ml bottle in stores, $9 to $11 per shot at bars): Take a sip of this full-bodied yet impeccably balanced whiskey and you'll see why it was named "Whiskey of the Year" by "Whisky Bible" author Jim Murray.

Full of complexity, with flavors of sweet caramel, spice and a touch of sherry, this whiskey is one to sip and savor."

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