de Vere's Irish Pub in Sacramento California

de Vere's Melt Month, Week 3: The Pulled Pork Melt

Starting tomorrow, this insanely tasty melt is available! What's inside? A melt-in-your-mouth blend of fontina cheese, pulled pork, dijon coleslaw, and pickled onions on French bread. Enjoy!

St. Baldrick's Day 2012: Battle of the Pubs

About St. Baldrick's Day

Shear amazingness! How much money would it take to shave your head? What if all that money went to making a difference in the lives of children battling cancer? That’s what St. Baldrick’s Day is all about—going bald for a good cause.

Every year, we gather the community for a one-day event that brings together teams of people willing to shave their heads bald as a sign of solidarity with children who are fighting cancer. All participants, which include local businesses, schools, politicians, de Vere’s patrons, and even plenty of women, raise money in support of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, then congregate at de Vere’s Irish Pub (Midtown Sacramento and Davis) to shave their heads. And yes, we’re talkin’ buzzed bald!

Sacramento vs. Davis

This year, we're doing a battle of the pubs: Which de Vere's pub (Sacramento or Davis) can raise more money? The challenge is on!

SACRAMENTO

Monday, March 12, 5pm

To sign up as a shavee or donate to the Sacramento team, click here.

DAVIS

Thursday March 15th 5pm

To sign up as a shavee or donate to the Davis team, click here.

We hope you’ll all come out and get involved. It’s truly an inspiring and entertaining evening to participate in as well as watch. (There’s literally an assembly line of headshavers and shavees!)

Please help de Vere’s Irish Pub support the St. Baldrick’s Foundation by making a donation on our behalf to support childhood cancer research. After all, in the United States, more children die of childhood cancer than any other disease. Click on “Make a Donation” or donate by mail or phone. Thank you for your support!

 

Trivia Teaser Answers

Last Friday, we posted the pub quiz questions from that week. To help inspire you to join us tonight (and EVERY Monday night), we're now posting the answers. How many did you know? See you tonight! 1. Who wrote the book entitles "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?" MARK TWAIN

2. Bonus: Yesterday (Sunday 7/10), the U.S. women's soccer team won their match against the team from which nation in the Women's World Cup. For a bonus point, in which nation is this tournament being held? BRAZIL, GERMANY

3. What continent, on average, experiences the most tornadoes annually than any other? NORTH AMERICA

4. What famous actor won a Best Director Oscar for directing the 1982 film "Reds"? WARREN BEATTY

5. Made by the Annabelle candy company, what is the name of the white taffy candy bar with the peanut butter center that is packaged in a black and yellow checkerboard wrapper? YABBA ZABBA

6. What is the name of the NHL team that plays their home games in Carolina? HURRICANES

7. In "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," the Knights who say "Ni" demanded that King Arthur use a specific type of fish to cut down the mightiest tree in the forest. What type of fish? HERRING

8. The star Belegeuse gets its name from the Arabic for "the giant's shoulder" and can be found in which constellation? ORION

9. Who is the author of the story known as the "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?" ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

10. In the first Gulf War, the U.S. put patriot missiles to the test against what 4-letter, Iraqi ballistic missiles? SCUD

11. What is the capital city of Uruguay? MONTEVIDEO

12.  Xylem or phloem: which is concerned with upwards water transportation through a plant, moving water and nutrients from the roots to the leaves? XYLEM

13. After a 20-year hiatus, which hugely popular CBS TV series, that ran for 13 full seasons, is set to return to the airwaves this fall, this time on TNT and with 3 of its most popular original cast members? DALLAS

14. Bonus: The word LASER is an acronym. What do the S and the R stand for in the acronym LASER? STIMULATED, RADIATION

15. Anagram: What specific professional job title can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Doogie is practical dirt?" Clues: 2 words, medical field. PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGIST

16. Who was the scientist that is most often credited for being the first to propose the theory of a sun-centered universe? COPERNICUS

17. Bonus: On the classic TV sitcom, "The Munsters," who played Lily and who played Merman? YVONNE DE CARLO AND FRED GWYNN

18. Speaking of Lilies, the character Lily on which current TV show is going to be replaced by another actress for next season? MODERN FAMILY

19. Similar to how a UPC symbol works, these types of matrix bar codes found on signs and objects allow people with smartphones to take pictures of them to download information. What is the two-letter term for these types of barcodes? QR CODE

20. Anagram: The name of what city, followed by its state, can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Own creamy pig?" CASPER, WYOMING

21. Before adopting the Euro, what was the unit of currency of the Netherlands? GUILDER

22. Which U. S. president had the most children, 15 of them?! (Legitimate) JOHN TYLER

23. With regards to cholesterol, what do the letters in the acronym LDL stand for? LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN

24. What controversial science-fiction and self-help writer with the first name of Lafayette, dies in 1986? L. RON HUBBARD

25. What nation has as its only two land neighbors India and Myanmar? BANGLADESH

26. What make and model of car was the General Lee on the classic TV show "The Dukes of Hazard"? DODGE CHARGER

27. In which U.S. city will you find the Arthur Ashe Tennis Stadium? NEW YORK CITY (FLUSHING, QUEENS)

28. Which Canadian province or territory is bordered by Alberta to its east? BRITISH COLUMBIA

29. Ireland: Ardrahan, Corleggy, Durrus and Cooleeny are all what type of Irish foodstuff? CHEESE

30: Bonus: Who are the managers of the American League and National League teams in this year's All-Star Game? BRUCE BOCHY, RON WASHINGTON

Tiebreaker: In what year was the first Subway sandwich shop opened in Bridgeport, CT? 1965

Our First-Ever Trivia Teaser

Every Monday night is trivia night here at the pub. For the first time, we're posting questions from this week's pub quiz. How many do YOU know? Leave your answers in the comments...we'll post the full set on answers on Monday to get you ready for another round that night! Happy weekend, all! 1. Who wrote the book entitled "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?"

2. Bonus: Yesterday (Sunday 7/10), the U.S. women's soccer team won their match against the team from which nation in the Women's World Cup. For a bonus point, in which nation is this tournament being held?

3. What continent, on average, experiences the most tornadoes annually than any other?

4. What famous actor won a Best Director Oscar for directing the 1982 film "Reds"?

5. Made by the Annabelle candy company, what is the name of the white taffy candy bar with the peanut butter center that is packaged in a black and yellow checkerboard wrapper?

6. What is the name of the NHL team that plays their home games in Carolina?

7. In "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," the Knights who say "Ni" demanded that King Arthur use a specific type of fish to cut down the mightiest tree in the forest. What type of fish?

8. The star Belegeuse gets its name from the Arabic for "the giant's shoulder" and can be found in which constellation?

9. Who is the author of the story known as the "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?"

10. In the first Gulf War, the U.S. put patriot missiles to the test against what 4-letter, Iraqi ballistic missiles?

11. What is the capital city of Uruguay?

12. Xylem or phloem: which is concerned with upwards water transportation through a plant, moving water and nutrients from the roots to the leaves?

13. After a 20-year hiatus, which hugely popular CBS TV series, that ran for 13 full seasons, is set to return to the airwaves this fall, this time on TNT and with 3 of its most popular original cast members?

14. Bonus: The word LASER is an acronym. What do the S and the R stand for in the acronym LASER?

15. Anagram: What specific professional job title can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Doogie is practical dirt?" Clues: 2 words, medical field.

16. Who was the scientist that is most often credited for being the first to propose the theory of a sun-centered universe?

17. Bonus: On the classic TV sitcom, "The Munsters," who played Lily and who played Merman?

18. Speaking of Lilies, the character Lily on which current TV show is going to be replaced by another actress for next season?

19. Similar to how a UPC symbol works, these types of matrix bar codes found on signs and objects allow people with smartphones to take pictures of them to download information. What is the two-letter term for these types of barcodes?

20. Anagram: The name of what city, followed by its state, can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Own creamy pig?"

21. Before adopting the Euro, what was the unit of currency of the Netherlands?

22. Which U. S. president had the most children, 15 of them?! (Legitimate)

23. With regards to cholesterol, what do the letters in the acronym LDL stand for?

24. What controversial science-fiction and self-help writer with the first name of Lafayette, dies in 1986?

25. What nation has as its only two land neighbors India and Myanmar?

26. What make and model of car was the General Lee on the classic TV show "The Dukes of Hazard"?

27. In which U.S. city will you find the Arthur Ashe Tennis Stadium?

28. Which Canadian province or territory is bordered by Alberta to its east?

29. Ireland: Ardrahan, Corleggy, Durrus and Cooleeny are all what type of Irish foodstuff?

30: Bonus: Who are the managers of the American League and National League teams in this year's All-Star Game?

Tiebreaker: In what year was the first Subway sandwich shop opened in Bridgeport, CT?

 

Don't forget to show your smarts! Leave answers in the comments!

Booker’s Whiskey Notes

Booker’s "Booker'sBottled By: James B. Beam Distilling Co. Clermont,KY

TypeKentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Alcohol content125.6 Proof

Availability US: Available Japan: Available Duty Free: Unknown Europe: Available

History: In 1988, Booker Noe introduced his own signature bourbon, Booker's True Barrel Bourbon. Inspired by a 200-year-old tradition, Booker's is the only bourbon bottled straight-from-the-barrel, uncut and unfiltered. First created as a holiday gift for his special friends, Booker's whiskey was so well-received that he decided to make it available to bourbon lovers worldwide; much to the joy of spirit connoisseurs everywhere. Booker's is the rarest, absolute best bourbon available.

Distinctions:

Booker’s Bourbon is the only uncut, unfiltered, straight-from-the-barrel, connoisseur’s sipping bourbon available today. It’s bottled at its natural proof of between 121 and 127, and aged between six and eight years. Booker Noe, Jim Beam’s grandson and master distiller emeritus, hand selects each barrel that will become Booker’s Bourbon. Each barrel that will become Booker’s bourbon is aged in the very center of the rackhouse where the temperature and humidity combines in the perfect proportion for the finest bourbon. This is truly the absolute best bourbon available. Tasting Notes Age: 6 to 8 years Proof: 121 to 127 Color: Deep, rich, smoky amber Aroma: Big oak, vanilla, smoky charcoal Taste: Intense, fruit, tannin, tobacco Finish: Clean, long, intense Award: Gold Medal Bourbon - Wine Enthusiast Comments: “A tasting of Small Batch Bourbons left me in awe of Booker’s.” – The Chicago Tribune”

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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Presenting “The Lighter Side of Ireland” Summer Menus

Crisp-fried fish. Savory cream sauce. Thick sizzling bacon.

While these traditional Irish food staples will always make your mouth water, they might not be what you always want to order—especially during the hot Sacramento summer months. Luckily, we have special, less-heavy menus options for you to indulge in while the mercury rises. For the first time ever, we're presenting a "Lighter Side of Ireland" dining experience—all summer long!

Starting this month, the progressive 3-phase menu gives you an opportunity to try less traditional, more refreshing fare (proving that Irish cuisine is much more than filling potatoes and gravy). It's our nod to the current food movement happening in Ireland right now.

Here's what we're serving: June’s Seaside Menu will offer fresh seafood specials. (Check it out here.) July’s Farm House Menu will feature a variety of savory meats and vegetables. Finally, August’s Urban Menu will highlight the modern side of Irish food. What's even more impressive is that options will change weekly. Our chefs Wes and Ricky have been busy—and extra creative!

If you come in Monday through Thursday, we'll be offering an incredible wine special.  Buy any two entrées from the special menus and get half off any  bottle of wine!

We hope everyone comes to join us for this culinary adventure and enjoy tasting

food from the ocean, the farm, and modern-day Ireland.

 

de Vere's Seaside Menu

 

The Lighter side of Ireland

 

~Menu changes weekly~

All items subject to availability

Seaside Menu

all items Pair well with ~

Railbridge Sauvignon blanc 7/26

Featured June 1-4

Grilled albacore tuna 13.5

House bacon, roasted fingerling potatoes, spring onion, arugula, Meyer lemon vinaigrette

Beer steamed mussels app 7.5 / entrée 16

Chorizo, red onion, fennel, tomato, garlic, grilled bread

Featured June 5-11

Roasted Beet salad 8

Red onion, fennel, goat cheese, maché, local olive oil

Grilled oysters 14

Spicy garlic butter

Broiled black cod 16

Asparagus, roasted shallots, house bacon, lemon caper beur blanc

Featured June 12-18

Grilled caesar salad 8

Croutons, shaved Irish Piquant flavored cheese

Smoked salmon Paté  12

Grilled Boddington’s wheat bread, small salad, cumberland sauce

Seared sea scallops 16

Crispy fingerlings, sautéed ramps, corn, smoked black cod chowder

Featured June 19-25

Smoked salmon boxty 9

Lemon, capers, sour cream, greens

Raw oysters 12

With accompaniments

Pan seared Irish trout 16

Potato and corn hash, spring onion white wine sauce

Featured June 26-30

Best of… Aq

Tax not included. Not valid with any other offer. Split entrees not    permitted. Service charge of 18% will be added to parties of 8 or more.

Chef :: Wesley Nilssen

Chef :: Tarick Abukhdier

Ireland is in the middle of a culinary revolution! Irish cooking is a clear example of cooking local while creating flavorful and exciting dishes. Irish cuisine is much more than heavy potatoes and thick gravys.

De Vere’s Irish Pub is dedicating our entire summer to showcasing the Irish cuisine movement while providing our guests with lighter fare during the hot summer months. This journey through Irish cooking will involve a new theme each month with weekly changing specials for you to try. We hope you will join us for this culinary adventure and enjoy tasting foods from the ocean, the farm, and modern day Ireland.

JUNE: “Seaside Menu” JULY: “Farmhouse Menu” August: “Urban Menu”

* We will be pairing all our menus with wines from Rail Bridge Cellars, a local urban winery from Sacramento.

* Buy Two entrées and Get 1/2 off a bottle!

The World Of Whiskey According to Wikipedia

Whiskey

"Whisky or whiskey is a type of alcoholic beverage distilled from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat, and maize (corn). Whisky is aged in wooden casks, made generally of white oak, except that in the United States corn whiskey need not be aged.

Whisky is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many competing denominations of origin and many classes and types. The unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation to less than 95% alcohol, and aging in wood.

Etymology:

Whisky is a shortened form of usquebaugh, which English borrowed from Gaelic (Irish uisce beatha and Scottish uisge beatha). This compound descends from Old Irish uisce, "water", and bethad, "of life" and meaning literally "water of life". It meant the same thing as the Latin aqua vītae which had been applied to distilled drinks since early 14th century. Other early spellings include usquebea (1706) and iskie bae (1583). In the Irish Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1405, the first written record of whiskey appears describing the death of a chieftain at Christmas from "taking a surfeit of aqua vitae". In Scotland, the first evidence of whisky production comes from an entry in the Exchequer Rolls for 1494 where malt is sent "To Friar John Cor, by order of the king, to make aquavitae".

History:

The art of distillation began with the Babylonians in Mesopotamia (in what is now Iraq) from at least the 2nd millennium BC, with perfumes and aromatics being distilled long before potable spirits. It is possible that the art of distillation was brought from the Mediterranean regions to Ireland by Irish missionaries between the 6th century and 7th century. Distillation was brought from Africa to Europe by the Moors, and its use spread through the monasteries,  largely for medicinal purposes, such as the treatment of colic, palsy, and smallpox.

Between 1100 and 1300, distillation spread to Ireland and Scotland, with monastic distilleries existing in Ireland in the 12th century. Since Britain had few grapes with which to make wine, barley beer was used instead, resulting in the development of whisky.  In 1494, as noted above, Scotland’s Exchequer granted the malt to Friar John Cor; this was enough malt to make about 1500 bottles, so the business was apparently thriving by that time.

King James IV of Scotland (r. 1488-1513) reportedly had a great liking for Scotch whisky, and in 1506 the town of Dundee purchased a large amount of Scotch from the Guild of Surgeon Barbers, which held the monopoly on production at the time. Between 1536 and 1541, King Henry VIII of England dissolved the monasteries, sending their monks out into the general public. Whisky production moved out of a monastic setting and into personal homes and farms as newly-independent monks needed to find a way to earn money for themselves.

The distillation process at the time was still in its infancy; whisky itself was imbibed at a very young age, and as a result tasted very raw and brutal compared to today’s versions. Renaissance-era whisky was also very potent and not diluted, and could even be dangerous at times. Over time, and with the happy accident of someone daring to drink from a cask which had been forgotten for several years, whisky evolved into a much smoother drink. In 1707, the Acts of Union merged England and Scotland, and thereafter taxes on it rose dramatically.[8]

After the English Malt Tax of 1725, most of Scotland’s distillation was either shut down or forced underground. Scotch whisky was hidden under altars, in coffins, and in any available space to avoid the governmental Excisemen.  Scottish distillers, operating out of homemade stills, took to distilling their whisky at night, where the darkness would hide the smoke rising from the stills. For this reason, the drink was known as moonshine.  At one point, it was estimated that over half of Scotland’s whisky output was illegal.

In America, whisky was used as currency during the American Revolution. It also was a highly coveted sundry and when an additional excise tax was levied against it, the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion took place.[7]

In 1823, the UK passed the Excise Act, legalising the distillation (for a fee), and this put a practical end to the large-scale production of Scottish moonshine.[

In 1831, Aeneas Coffey invented the Coffey still, allowing for cheaper and more efficient distillation of whisky. In 1850, Andrew Usher mixed traditional whisky with that from the new Coffey still, and in doing so created the first Scottish blended whisky. This new grain whisky was scoffed at by Irish distillers, who clung to their malt whisky. Many Irish contended that the new mixture was, in fact, not whisky at all.[3]

By the 1880s, the French brandy industry was devastated by the phylloxera pest that ruined much of the grape crop; as a result, whisky became the primary liquor in many markets. Types:

Copper Pot stills at Auchentoshan Distillery in Scotland

Whisky or whisky-like products are produced in most grain-growing areas. They differ in base product, alcoholic content, and quality.

Malted barley is an ingredient of some whiskies.

  • Malt is whisky made entirely from malted barley and distilled in an onion-shaped pot still.
  • Grain is made from malted and unmalted barley along with other grains, usually in a continuous "patent" or "Coffey" still. Until recently it was only used in blends, but there are now some single grain scotches being marketed.

Malts and grains are combined in various ways

  • Vatted malt is blended from malt whiskies from different distilleries. If a whisky is labelled "pure malt" or just "malt" it is almost certain to be a vatted whisky. This is also sometimes labelled as "blended malt" whisky.
  • Single malt whisky is malt whisky from a single distillery. However, unless the whisky is described as "single-cask" it will contain whisky from many casks, and different years, so the blender can achieve a taste recognisable as typical of the distillery. In most cases, the name of a single malt will be that of the distillery (The Glenlivet, Bushmills, Yoichi), with an age statement and perhaps some indication of some special treatments such as maturation in a port wine cask.
  • Pure pot still whiskey refers to a whiskey distilled in a pot-still (like single malt) from a mash of mixed malted and unmalted barley. It is exclusive to Ireland.
  • Malted barley is an ingredient of some whiskies.

    Blended whiskies are made from a mixture of malt and grain whiskies. A whisky simply described as Scotch Whisky or Irish Whiskey is most likely to be a blend in this sense. A blend is usually from many distilleries so that the blender can produce a flavour consistent with the brand, and the brand name (e.g., Chivas Regal, Canadian Club) will usually not therefore contain the name of a distillery. Jameson Irish Whiskey is an exception and comes from only one distillery. However, "blend" can (less frequently) have other meanings. A mixture of malts (with no grain) from different distilleries (more usually called a vatted malt) may sometimes be referred to as a "blended malt", and a mixture of grain whiskies with no malts will sometimes carry the designation "blended grain".

  • Cask strength whiskies are rare and usually only the very best whiskies are bottled in this way. They are usually bottled from the cask undiluted. Rather than diluting, the distiller is inviting the drinker to dilute to the level of potency most palatable (often no dilution is necessary, such is the quality of single cask whiskies). Single cask whiskies are usually bottled by specialist independent bottlers, such as Duncan Taylor, Master of Malt, Gordon & MacPhail and Cadenhead amongst others.

Whiskies do not mature in the bottle, only in the cask, so the "age" of a whisky is the time between distillation and bottling. This reflects how much the cask has interacted with the whisky, changing its chemical makeup and taste. Whiskies which have been in bottle for many years may have a rarity value, but are not "older" and will not necessarily be "better" than a more recently made whisky matured in wood for a similar time. Most whiskies are sold at or near an alcoholic strength of 40% abv.

American whiskeys:

American whiskey is distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain. It must have the taste, aroma, and other characteristics commonly attributed to whiskey.

The types listed in the federal regulations are:

  • Bourbon whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% corn (maize).
  • Rye whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% rye.
  • Wheat whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% wheat.
  • Malt whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted barley.
  • Rye malt whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted rye.
  • Corn whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 80% corn (maize).

These "named types" of American whiskey must be distilled to not more than 80 percent alcohol by volume. They must then be aged in charred new oak containers, except for corn whiskey. Corn whiskey does not have to be aged but, if it is aged, it must be in new un-charred oak barrels or used barrels. The ageing for corn whiskey usually is brief, e.g., six months.

If the aging for a "named type" reaches 2 years or beyond, the whiskey is then additionally designated "straight" e.g., "straight rye whiskey". "Straight whiskey" (without naming a grain) is a whiskey which has been aged in charred new oak containers for 2 years or more and distilled at not more than 80 percent alcohol by volume but is derived from less than 51% of any one grain.

American blended whiskeys combine straight whiskey with grain neutral spirits (GNS), flavourings and colourings. The percentage of GNS must be disclosed on the label and may be as much at 80% on a proof gallon basis. Blended whiskey has the same alcohol content as straight whiskey but a much milder flavour.

Important in the marketplace is Tennessee whiskey, of which Jack Daniel's is the leading example. During production it is identical to bourbon whiskey in almost every important respect including the sour mash process. The only differences is that Tennessee whiskey is filtered through sugar maple charcoal, which is claimed to remove some unpleasant flavours and odours and produce a cleaner spirit. Though not defined by Federal regulations, the Government of the United States officially recognized Tennessee whiskey as a separate style distinct from bourbon in 1941.

Templeton Rye Whisky(Templeton, Iowa)

The United States was recovering from World War I, and many farmers needed additional income to support their families and farm payments. In response to this need for revenue, a group of farmers in a small town of Templeton, Iowa began to brew and distil their own form of rye whiskey, which they named Templeton Rye. Word of the single barrel malt Templeton Rye quickly spread and eventually caught the attention of the Capone gang, who began bootlegging hundreds of kegs of Templeton Rye per month and distributing it to speakeasies throughout New York, Chicago and as far west as Denver. Legend has it that Capone even orchestrated getting Templeton Rye smuggled to him while incarcerated in Alcatraz.

Australian whiskeys:

Australia produces a number of single malt whiskies. The whiskies being produced on the island State of Tasmania in particular are receiving global attention.

Australian whiskies are winning an increasing number of global whisky awards and medals, including for example the World Whiskies Awards and Jim Murray's Whisky Bible 'Liquid Gold Awards'.

Australian distilleries include: Bakery Hill, Hellyers Road, Lark, Limeburners, Nant, Small Concern (no longer operating), Smith's (no longer operating) and Sullivan's Cove.

Canadian whiskeys:

 

Canadian whiskies are usually lighter and smoother than other whisky styles. Another common characteristic of many Canadian whiskies is their use of rye that has been malted, which provides a fuller flavour and smoothness. By Canadian law,[11] Canadian whiskies must be produced in Canada, be distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain, "be aged in small wood for not less than 3 years", and "possess the aroma, taste and character generally attributed to Canadian whisky". The terms "Canadian Whisky", "Canadian Rye Whisky" and "Rye Whisky" are legally indistinguishable in Canada and do not denote any particular proportion of rye or other grain used in production.

Finnish whiskeys:

There are two working distilleries in Finland and a third one is under construction. Whisky retail sales in Finland are controlled solely by the state alcohol monopoly Alko and advertisement of strong alcoholic beverages is banned.

German whiskeys:

The distillation of German-made whisky is a relatively recent phenomenon having only started in the last 30 years. The styles produced resemble those made in Ireland, Scotland and the United States: single malts, blends, and bourbon styles. There is no standard spelling of German whiskies with distilleries using both "whisky" and "whiskey" and one even using "whessky", a play on the word whisky and Hessen, the state in which it is produced. There are currently ten distilleries in Germany producing whisky.

Indian whiskeys:

Indian whisky is an alcoholic beverage that is labelled as "whisky" in India. Much Indian whisky is distilled from fermented molasses, and as such would be considered a sort of rum outside of the Indian subcontinent. 90% of the "whisky" consumed in India is molasses based, although India has begun to distill whisky from malt and other grains.[15]

Kasauli Distillery is set in the Himalaya mountains and opened in the late 1820s. The main whisky brand is a single malt named "Solan No. 1". This was named after the town nearby called Solan. It was the best selling Indian whisky till recently, but has declined since the early 1980s because of the stiff competition from the larger distilleries. Other whiskies this distillery produces are Diplomat Deluxe, Colonel's Special, Black Knight and Summer Hall.

Irish whiskeys:

Most Irish whiskeys are distilled three times. Though traditionally distilled using pot stills, column still are now used to produce grain whiskey for blends. By law, Irish whiskey must be produced in Ireland and aged in wooden casks for a period of no less than three years, although in practice it is usually three or four times that period.[18] Unpeated malt is almost always used, the main exception being Connemara Peated Malt whiskey.

There are several types of whiskey common to Ireland: single malt, single grain, blended whiskey and uniquely to Ireland, pure pot still whiskey. The designation "pure pot still" as used in Ireland generally refers to whiskey made of 100% barley, mixed malted and unmalted, and distilled in a pot still made of copper. The "green" unmalted barley gives the traditional pure pot still whiskey a spicy, uniquely Irish quality. Like single malt, pure pot still is sold as such or blended with grain whiskey. Usually no real distinction is made between whether a blended whiskey was made from single malt or pure pot still.

Japanese Whiskeys:

The model for Japanese whiskeys is the single malt Scotch, although there are also examples of Japanese blended whiskies. The base is a mash of malted barley, dried in kilns fired with a little peat (although considerably less than in Scotland), and distilled using the pot still method. For some time exports of Japanese whisky suffered from the belief in the West that whisky made in the Scotch style, but not produced in Scotland, was inferior, and until fairly recently, the market for Japanese whiskies was almost entirely domestic. In recent years, Japanese whiskies have won prestigious international awards and now enjoy a reputation as a quality product.

Scotch whiskeys:

Scotch whiskeys are generally distilled twice, though some are distilled a third time. International laws require anything bearing the label "Scotch" to be distilled in Scotland and matured for a minimum of three years and one day in oak casks, among other, more specific criteria. If Scotch whisky is from more than one cask, and if it includes an age statement on the bottle, it must reflect the age of the youngest whisky in the blend. Many cask-strength single malts omit the age as they use younger elements in minute amounts for flavouring and mellowing. The basic types of Scotch are malt and grain, which are combined to create blends. Many, though not all, Scotch whiskies use peat smoke to treat their malt, giving Scotch its distinctive smoky flavour. While the market is dominated by blends, the most highly prized of Scotch whiskies are the single malts. Scotch whiskies are divided into five main regions: Highland, Lowland, Islay, Speyside and Campbeltown.

Welsh Whiskeys:

In 2000, Penderyn Distillery started production of the Penderyn single malt Welsh whisky in Wales, the first Welsh whisky since all production ended in 1894. The first bottles went on sale on 1 March 2004, Saint David's Day, and the whisky is now sold throughout the world. Penderyn Distillery is situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park and is considered the smallest distillery in the world.

Other Whiskeys:

In Brittany, France, five distilleries (Distillerie des Menhirs,[24] Guillon,[25] Glann ar Mor,[26] Kaerilis[27] and Warenghem[28]) produce whisky using techniques similar to those in Scotland.

One whisky is produced on the French island of Corsica: Pietra & Mavella (P&M) is a coproduction of the brewery Pietra and the distillery Mavella. The mash is enriched with chestnut flour. P&M is matured in muscat casks (Domaine Gentile).[29][not in citation given]

Manx Spirit from the Isle of Man is, like some Virginia whiskeys in the USA, distilled elsewhere and re-distilled in the country of its nominal "origin".

In Spain there is a distillery named DYC, started in 1948.

In Sweden a new distillery (Mackmyra), started selling its products in 2006.

Recently at least two distilleries in the traditionally brandy-producing Caucasus region announced their plans to enter the Russian domestic market with whiskies. The Stavropol-based Praskoveysky distillery bases its product on Irish technology, while in Kizlyar, Dagestan's "Russian Whisky" announced a Scotch-inspired drink in single malt, blended and wheat varieties.

In Taiwan, the King Car company built a whisky distillery in the city of Yilan, and has recently begun marketing Kavalan Single Malt Whisky.

Production of whisky started in Norfolk, England in late 2006 and the first whisky (as opposed to malt spirit) was made available to the public in November 2009. This is the first English single malt in over 100 years. It was produced at St George's Distillery by the English Whisky Company.  Previously Bristol and Liverpool were centres of English whisky production. East Anglia is a source of much of the grain used in Scotch whisky.

Names and spellings:

The word "whisky" is believed to have been coined by soldiers of King Henry II who invaded Ireland in the 12th century as they struggled to pronounce the native Irish words uisce beatha [ɪʃkʲə bʲahə], meaning "water of life". Over time, the pronunciation changed from "whishkeyba" (an approximation of how the Irish term sounds) to "whisky". The name itself is a Gaelic calque of the Latin phrase aqua vitae, meaning "water of life".

Much is made of the word's two spellings, whisky and whiskey. Today, the spelling whisky (plural whiskies) is generally used for whiskies distilled in Scotland, Wales, Canada, and Japan, while whiskey (plural whiskeys) is used for the whiskeys distilled in Ireland and the United States. However, several prominent American brands, such as Maker's Mark and George Dickel, use the 'whisky' spelling. When writing generally about this type of spirit, either spelling is correct.

"Scotch" is the internationally recognized term for "Scotch whisky" however it is rarely used in Scotland, where the drink is called 'whisky.'

In many Latin-American countries, whisky (wee-skee) is used as a photographer's cue to smile, supplanting English "cheese". The Uruguayan film Whisky got its name because of this.

Chemistry:

Whiskeys and other distilled beverages such as cognac and rum are complex beverages containing a vast range of flavouring compounds, of which some 200 to 300 can be easily detected by chemical analysis. The flavoring chemicals include "carbonyl compounds, alcohols, carboxylic acids and their esters, nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds, terpenes, and oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds" and esters of fatty acids.  The nitrogen compounds include pyridines, picolines and pyrazines.

Flavours from distillation:

The flavoring of whisky is partially determined by the presence of congeners and fusel oils. Fusel oils are higher alcohols than ethanol, are mildly toxic, and have a strong, disagreeable smell and taste. An excess of fusel oils in whisky is considered a defect. A variety of methods are employed in the distillation process to remove unwanted fusel oils. Traditionally, American distillers focused on secondary filtration using charcoal, gravel, sand, or linen to remove undesired distillates. Canadian distillers have traditionally employed column stills which can be controlled to produce an almost pure (and less flavorful) ethanol known as neutral grain spirit or grain neutral spirit (GNS).  Flavor is restored by blending the neutral grain spirits with flavoring whiskies.

Acetals are rapidly formed in distillates and a great many are found in distilled beverages, the most prominent being acetaldehyde diethyl acetal (1,1-diethoxyethane). Among whiskies the highest levels are associated with malt whisky. This acetal is a principal flavour compound in sherry, and contributes fruitiness to the aroma.

The diketone diacetyl (2,3-Butanedione) has a buttery aroma and is present in almost all distilled beverages. Whiskies and cognacs typically contain more than vodkas, but significantly less than rums or brandies.[42]

Flavours from oak:

Whisky lactone (3-methyl-4-octanolide) is found in all types of oak. This lactone has a strong coconut aroma.  Whisky lactone is also known as quercus lactone.  Commercially charred oaks are rich in phenolic compounds. One study identified 40 different phenolic compounds. The coumarin scopoletin is present in whisky, with the highest level reported in Bourbon whiskey.

Bourbon

Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria."

Whiskey according to Wikipedia

Disclaimer:

This article is posted here from Wikipedia so readers of our blog can see a brief overview of whiskey without having to leave our blog.   All credit from this post goes to Wikipedia.  We just like to collect facts and tasting notes from all over the web to share with our Whiskey Society and our guests that love whiskey.  Happy reading and drinking!

You can try the Whiskeys mentioned here at  de Vere’s Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey’s at a discount!

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Knob Creek Bourbon Review

 

Knob Creek

Knob Creek is the Kentucky town where Abraham Lincoln’s father, Thomas, owned a farm and worked at the local distillery. This nine-year-old Bourbon is made with the same high-rye formula as Basil Hayden’s. It has a nutty nose of sweet, tangy fruit and rye, with malt, spice and nuts on the palate, drying in the finish with notes of vanilla. 50.0% ABV

 

 

 

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

If you haven't joined our Whiskey Society you should sign up today!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

 

Sacramento Burger Month at de Vere's Pub

Stadium Burger at de Vere’s Irish Pub –

Week 3 #sacburgermonth

Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

Week 3: Sunday May 15 – Saturday May 21

Share this burger with your friends!

Local sports fans, this one is for you! This double ground beef patty is stuffed with 1.5 ounces of sharp cheddar cheese, coated with whole grain mustard, and smothered with a house made relish containing delicious peppadews. The chef’s searched far and wide for the perfect soft pretzel bun to compliment this beautiful burger creation.

Henry personally selected an organic wheat beer that goes perfectly with the pickled peppered flavors that top this burger. Mothership Wit from New Belgium Brewery is brewed with wheat and barley malt, as well as coriander and orange peel spicing resulting in a balance of citrus and sour flavors held in suspension by a bright burst of carbonation.

This premium burger/beer pairing is available for a limited time for $15 only at de Vere’s Irish Pub in Sacramento! Ask your server for the Sac Burger Month special!

This Burger has also been nominated in The ESPN "Fanwich" Contest and we need your votes! To Vote click here!

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About Rodney

Rodney is a long time Sacramento area resident that has been a cheeseburger lover for as long as he can remember. You can find his beautiful burger photography and tasty burger reviews at BurgerJunkies.com or drop him a line@burgerjunkies on Twitter to say Hi!

 

May is National Hamburger Month

May is National Hamburger Month

Original Article from Foodspotting.com
"Editor's Note: With nearly 500 foodspottings and numerous burgers under his belt, Super SpotterRodney Blackwell is clearly the perfect person to talk to about National Hamburger Month. Check out the contest he's running for burger junkies in Sacramento and be sure to follow his epic Foodspotting hamburger guide.

 

May is National Hamburger Month! As the creator of California-based burger review blog Burger Junkies, I jumped at the chance to share my love for burgers by teaming up with de Vere's Irish Pubin Sacramento to create #sacburgermonth. For each week in May, de Vere's chefs created a Featured Burger with beer pairings. You can check out those burgers in our #sacburgermonth guide.

It may be mid-May, but it’s never too late to join in the burger fun! To celebrate National Burger Month, add a burger that you’ve enjoyed to the new National Hamburger Month Foodspotting guide. It’s an open guide, so hopefully together we can create one of the best visual burger resources in the world!

Rodney Blackwell runs T-ShirtForums.com and when he’s not thinking about t-shirts, he’s out fueling his Foodspotting addiction. You can follow his burger adventures at BurgerJunkies.com or on@burgerjunkies.

 

Tomorrow Is Derby Day at de Vere's Pub

Each year, in Louisville, Kentucky, a two week long festival culminates in an epic thoroughbred horse race that is watched the world over. The Kentucky Derby, a Grade I stakes race, is ten furlongs or one and a quarter miles in length, and involves the fastest, top competing colts, geldings and fillies in the United States. Also touted the “Run for the Roses” since the winner is draped in a rosy blanket, this competition garners more spectators and bets than any other stakes race of its kind. This year, watch the “fastest two minutes in sports” at de Vere's Irish Pub, which will be hosting an unprecedented Derby Day event this year on Saturday, May 7th beginning at noon.

The pre-race festivities will include specials on Mint Juleps and Pimms Cups, which will start at only $5, as well as a big hat contest for the ladies!

You may have seen photographs of the old days when high society attended horse races as a matter of course, and all the well-to-do women would don extravagant lids, hoop skirts, and frilly dresses. So, classy gals, wear your hat that takes up the most real estate possible, and contend for to-be-announced prizes and glory! Don't have a big hat already? Try Sacramento City Dry Goods or the Village Hat Shop in Old Sacramento in an effort to support local businesses, something that de Vere's endeavors to do as well at every possible turn!

Mint Juleps proffered will be made with Woodford or Pure Kentucky bourbon, and our bartenders have been gearing up to make the best ones you've ever tasted. For more on the making of these drinks, check out these youtube.com videos:

Mint Julep: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lP2VQ9eiUo&feature=related

Pimms Cup: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjXuBbs3wlk&feature=fvwrel

The race itself will commence at 3pm and suspense will fill the pub as our patrons gather to witness history in the making. All will be on the edge of their bar stools, and from under the rim of their big hats, as they sip a well-constructed cocktail and cheer for their favorite thoroughbred, a new contender will strive ahead to become the new victor of the Kentucky Derby. De Vere's extends an invite to you, your friends and family to enjoy this annual race within the warmth of our family's pub.

For more information or to RSVP to this event, please visit the event page at: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=154826847910731

 

Sacramento Burger Month's Week 1 Burger: The Tostada Burger

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger

Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

To Vote for this burger click here

To Learn what's Next click here

To Vote for the 4th week burger click here

 

All About Sacramento Burger Month at de Vere's Pub! (Part One)

Sac Burger Month (or  hashtag #sacburgermonth on Twitter) is a joint effort between de Vere’s Irish Pub in Since May is officially National Hamburger Month, we thought it would be great to promote burger awareness here in our beautiful city of Sacramento.

Each week in May, the fine chefs at de Vere’s Irish Pub will be showcasing a unique featured burger masterpiece that will only be available for that week only.

Here’s the Burger Breakdown:

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger

Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

 

Week 2: Sunday May 8 – Saturday May 14

The Firestone Burger

Firestone Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Firestone Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

This juicy cheeseburger is cooked in a red wine, shallots, and balsamic vinegar based sauce that gives it a powerful sweet and tangy flavor.  The double ground smoked beef patty is infused with smoked pork and topped with bacon, smoked cheddar goat cheese and fried onions. This flavorful burger is served on a lightly toasted, locally sourced, freshly baked bun.

We paired this burger with an Abbey ale from New Belgium Brewery out of Colorado. The chocolatey undertones allow this beer to hold its own with the smokiness of the Firestone Burger.

 

Week 3: Sunday May 15 – Saturday May 21

The Stadium Burger

Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Local sports fans, this one is for you! This double ground beef patty is stuffed with 1.5 ounces of sharp cheddar cheese, coated with whole grain mustard, and smothered with a house made relish containing delicious peppadews. The chef’s searched far and wide for the perfect soft pretzel bun to compliment this beautiful burger creation.

Henry personally selected an organic wheat beer that goes perfectly with the pickled peppered flavors that top this burger. Mothership Wit from New Belgium Brewery is brewed with wheat and barley malt, as well as coriander and orange peel spicing resulting in a balance of citrus and sour flavors held in suspension by a bright burst of carbonation.

 

Week 4: Sunday May 22- Saturday May 28

YOU DECIDE!

Vote for our last Weekly Featured Burger
Vote for our last Weekly Featured Burger 

We haven’t picked the burger for Week 4 yet.

Your votes for the 4th Week #sacburgermonth burger will decide which one gets featured on the menu!

The de Vere’s chefs have dreamed up 2 crazy burger creations for #sacburgermonth Week 4, but only 1 can be on the menu.

Help us choose the Week 4 Featured Burger by taking our 5 second survey and be entered into a chance to win a t-shirt and free $25 Gift Card from de Vere’s Irish Pub!

Will it be:

A Prime Rib Burger with carmalized onions manchango cheese, Horse radish mayo and Au Jus

Or will it be:

A Philly Burger Pepercorned crusted all beef patty with house made Pastrami , house made sour kraut, and swiss cheese with a roasted red pepper mayo.

Cast Your Vote

Sacramento and BurgerJunkies.com (a burger review blog).

Sac Burger Month (or  hashtag #sacburgermonth on Twitter) is a joint effort between de Vere’s Irish Pub in

Buffalo Trace Great Every Day Bourbon

 

 

Buffalo Trace

An aroma of gum, vanilla, mint, and molasses. Sweet, fruity and notably spicy on the palate, with emerging brown sugar and oak. Water releases intensive, fruity notes. The finish is long, spicy and comparatively dry, with developing vanilla. 45.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

Irish pub to replace Soga's

"Brothers Simon and Henry de Vere White are co-owners of the popular de Vere's Irish Pub in Sacramento and will be branching out to Davis by September 2011. The de Vere Whites hail from Ireland and plan to bring an Irish flair to the Downtown Davis dining experience.

"We're an Irish pub, we cater to a wide variety of people, from families with kids to the business community," said Simon. "We're very food focused here, so I think what helps us be successful is being family owned and operated."

De Vere's Irish Pub signed a 10-year lease at 217 E St., a 4,800 square foot location formerly occupied by Soga's. The new location is 1,000 square feet larger than the Sacramento location.

De Vere's will take over the building formerly occupied by Soga's, an Italian and American food restaurant that permanently closed on Nov. 21 2010, after filing for bankruptcy.

"We liked the look of the building, we wanted to be downtown," said Simon. "We thought that downtown Davis had a great feel to it, and it seems that that's where the focus of the food industry is."

De Vere's will provide a hearty menu filled with traditional Irish food, as well as the familiar cheeseburger and sandwich for the more timid restaurant-goers.

Most of the food served will be made fresh in-house, including curing their own bacon, butchering their own meat and making their own pudding.

"We like to say we make everything here, except for Ranch," said Simon.

Despite Soga's recent bankruptcy, the de Vere Whites were not discouraged from branching out into Davis with a second pub after two successful years in Sacramento.

"We were always very intrigued with Davis. Great community and culture there. Family-oriented town, family business," said Simon. "We thought that going into a place that has a university system was very compelling and thought we would be a good fit for Davis."

For those looking for an authentic Irish pub experience, de Vere's is the place to go. De Vere's Irish Pub provides both authentic Irish cuisine and authentic Irish interior design complete with family pictures, paintings and Irish antiques.

"In Ireland, kids are at the pubs. You're born in the pub, grow up in the pub, get married in the pub," said Simon. "Every Sunday is family Sunday, we discount the kids menu. We definitely try to attract the family aspect."

De Vere's, winner of Sacramento Magazine's Best Pub Food award of 2010, prides itself on its hospitality, food and cozy atmosphere.

The opening of de Vere's is good news for the alcohol savvy as well, offering an extensive alcohol menu with 89 varieties of whiskey and 66 varieties of scotch."

 

DYLAN AARON can be reached at city@theaggie.org.

 

Eagle Rare Vs. Eagle Rare 17 yr

Eagle Rare Eagle Rare is 10 years old, and the Bourbon equivalent of a single cask Scotch malt whisky. Soft and delicate on the nose, with honey, leather, vanilla and mild oak. Sweet corn and stewed fruits on the palate, with spices, vanilla and developing rye notes. The finish is long and quite sweet, with a hint of ginger. 45.0% ABV,

Eagle Rare 17yr

The Eagle Rare brand was introduced in 1975 by Canadian distilling giant Joseph E Seagram & Sons Inc, and in 1989 it was acquired by the Sazerac company of New Orleans. In its present incarnation, Eagle Rare is part of Sazerac’s Buffalo Trace Antique Collection, which is updated annually. The latest variant of Eagle Rare, launched last autumn, comprises barrels that were distilled in the spring of 1991. Big and bold on the nose, with vanilla, wood adhesive and almonds, plus a whiff of leather. Very smooth on the palate, full-bodied and fruity, with rye and a hint of mint. The finish comprises vanilla fudge and a final kick of spice. *** 45.0%

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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The History of Bourbon

"Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria.

You can try a lot of the  Whiskey's in this post  at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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Bulleit

Bulleit Bulleit Bourbon is made by following the small-batch technique inspired by Augustus Bulleit over 150 years ago. Only the highest quality ingredients are used. Bulleit Bourbon’s subtlety and complexity stem from its unique blend of rye, corn and barley malt, along with special strains of yeast. Because Bulleit Bourbon is especially high in rye content, it has a bold and spicy character with a distinctively smooth, clean finish.

The hints of oak and spice, the russet color, the crisp, clean flavor that feels smooth in the throat, the notes of vanilla and honey – all add up to a bourbon that has a distinct and individual character. The complex taste of Bulleit Bourbon is something that can only be appreciated once tried.

Bulleit Bourbon is an American brand of straight bourbon whiskey characterized by its high rye content at approximately 30%, the absence of phenol and aging of at least six years.[1] The design of the flask is reminiscent of an old-fashioned brown medicine flask with raised lettering and a cork stopper. The bourbon is 45% alcohol by volume, or 90 proof in most countries, in 2008 however, in Australia, Bulleit Bourbon is now imported at 40% and bottled in the UK, rather than in the US. This change has also been marked by the label on the bottle no longer being applied diagonally, but horizontally, as pictured, and also a change in the manufacture of the actual glass bottle. The new bottle design is screw top as opposed to plastic mounted cork, and the bottle lettering is raised higher and its bottle manufacture is generally lower quality, but will only be seen in the UK bottling (40%) export markets. Bulleit sold on the UK market, presently (after this change in bottling location) is presumably also 40% alcohol by volume, not 45%.

History:

According to company lore, the first batch of Bulleit was first made in the 1800s by Augustus Bulleit, but discontinued after his death. In 1987, the great-great-grandson of the original creator, Tom Bulleit created the first modern-day batch, which was introduced to US markets in 1999, and Australia, UK and Germany in 2000.[2][3] In 1997 Bulleit was bought by Seagram, and is now distilled in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky.[4] Following an acquisition of Seagram, the Bulleit brand is now owned by Diageo.

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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A toast of whiskey

A toast of whiskey

Author: Chris Macias
Published: March 16th, 2011 02:09 PM

"A pint of Guinness sounds good for St. Patrick's Day, but this year we're ready to give a little Irish whiskey a spin. In the world of spirits, Irish whiskey's known for being exceptionally smooth compared to its counterparts around the world.

In Ireland, the majority of whiskeys are distilled three times during production, making for a clean and delicately sweet drink that goes down easy before yelling "Erin go bragh."

Whiskey's been produced in Ireland for centuries, and the country was home at one point to more than 1,000 distilleries. That number has been reduced to just a handful in Ireland today, but they still produce a range of whiskey styles from such brands as Bushmills, Jameson and Redbreast.

To get a head start on St. Patrick's Day, we're here at de Vere's Irish Pub, where the TVs broadcast a Champions League soccer match with Barcelona vs. Arsenal.

De Vere's carries 32 different Irish whiskeys, from smoky peat whiskeys to a bottle of Tyrconnell that's been aged in sherry casks. De Vere's even hosts its own whiskey society to introduce enthusiasts to the diversity found in this spirit.

"We get a lot of people who started as wine drinkers and then found something new they liked learning about," said co-owner Simon de Vere White.

"In an Irish whiskey, you'll be looking for something that's well-balanced with a little heat and some spice. It'll have less of the caramel and vanilla flavors that you'll find in American whiskey and bourbon."

So where to start with Irish whiskey? Well, make your first decision one that could save your life. If drinking away from home, designate a driver or keep a taxi service's number on hand.

St. Patrick's Day ranks as one of the most dangerous days on the road due to alcohol consumption. According to the CHP, a total of five people were killed and 142 people injured in 240 alcohol-involved collisions statewide on St. Patrick's Day in 2009 and 2010.

After you've checked this off your list, Liquid Assets recommends you check out these three Irish whiskeys on St. Patrick's Day and beyond:

Slane Castle Irish Whiskey (roughly $30 for 750 ml bottle, $7-$10 per shot at bars): De Vere White likes to start newcomers with this smooth and cask-y spirit that's been aged in American bourbon barrels. This whiskey definitely carries a little kick and a spicy finish, but paired with a smooth and balanced mouthfeel, just like a proper Irish whiskey should.

Connemara Peated Single Malt Irish Whiskey (about $40 for a 750 ml bottle in stores, $7-$10 per shot at bars): Here's a tasty example of a peated whiskey, which uses grains that have been roasted over a peat fire. The result is a smoky and earthy drink that's something like the whiskey equivalent of a fine cigar. Look for an exceptionally long finish with a bit of sweetness and spice mixed in with that smoky character.

Redbreast 12-year-old Pure Pot Still Irish Whiskey (roughly $40 per 750 ml bottle in stores, $9 to $11 per shot at bars): Take a sip of this full-bodied yet impeccably balanced whiskey and you'll see why it was named "Whiskey of the Year" by "Whisky Bible" author Jim Murray.

Full of complexity, with flavors of sweet caramel, spice and a touch of sherry, this whiskey is one to sip and savor."

Click here to find out more!

Original Article