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Burger Thursdays at de Vere’s Irish Pub in Sacramento, CA

by  on October 6, 2011 in Blog

Thursdays are about to be a bit more burgerly thanks to the new Burger Thursday’s going on at de Vere’s Irish Pub.

After the success of #sacburgermonth, one of the key takeaways was that Sacramento LOVES burgers! The customers (and even employees) at de Vere’s kept asking what the next featured burger would be,  so Henry came up with the idea of Burger Thursdays to bring some fun new hamburgers to the menu all throughout the year.

As a bonus, he asked your favorite burgerjunkie here to cosponsor the event to help get the word out.  I thought, heck, why wait for National Burger Month to celebrate the cheeseburger?

So every month starting with this October, 2 burgers will be featured. One crazy cheeseburger for the first 2 Thursdays and one hopped up hamburger for the second 2 Thursdays. $11.95 will get you a great burger and some fries every Thursday from here on out at de Vere’s.

Think of me as your sandwich scout, your cheeseburger channel, if you will.

I will guide you through the amazing featured burgers each month right here on this blog and onTwitter @burgerjunkies (look for the #burgerthursdays hashtag). I’ll even drop a mouthwatering Facebook post or two in there along the way.

The regular burger at de Vere’s is definitely good. But when the let the chef loose and start coming up with fun, featured burger creations, their burger game gets elevated to a whole new level.

Right out of the gate, Wes, the chef at de Vere’s brought the heat with this buffalo wing inspired creation that we finally dubbed, the “Buffalo Crunch” burger. I’ll let Wes explain it in this video:

http://youtu.be/aV56tiUJK78

 

You heard correctly:   scratch made buffalo wing hot sauce, a bleu cheese dressing, house made potato chips (you will SERIOUSLY appreciate the CRUNCH), topped with tomato and lettuce on a pretzel bun.

It looks a little something like this (before you dive in):

If you were to drop the top like a 64′ Impala, it would look something like so:

Guess what today is? Thursday. And if you’re reading this on any other day than Thursday, start your countdown, because you’re gonna want to make de Vere’s Irish Pub your new weekly Thursday tradition.

Tip:   Splurge a little while you’re there and ask the server for their amazing curry ketchup to go with your fries.  It may set you back an extra 75 cents, but it’s well worth it. Be sure to tell them the Burger Junkie sent ya :)

Burgely Yours,

Rodney

PS. Be sure to enter the Burger Thursdays Photo Contest on the de Vere’s Facebook page. That $75 gift card first prize can buy a lot of burgers!

It's Here: July's Lighter Side of Ireland Menu

Last month, we kicked off our first-ever "Lighter Side of Ireland" food series with the refreshing Seaside Menu. This month, we're getting rustic with a Farmhouse Menu, which debuted this week. Flavorful cuts of meat...crisp vegetables...fresh-picked, juicy fruits. Are you hungry yet? Even more mouthwatering is the fact that our prolific chefs (it's unreal how many unique dishes they dream up every month) have sourced the most satisfying ingredients from local growers.

Speaking of local, don't forget you can get a bottle of  wine at half price when you order two entrees, Monday through Thursday.  For more information check out our Weekday Wine & Dine promotion.

Check out the Farmhouse Menu below for the most updated lineup.

July's Farmhouse Menu at de Vere's Pub

Ireland is in the middle of a culinary revolution! Irish cooking is a clear example of cooking local while creating flavorful and exciting dishes. Irish cuisine is much more than heavy potatoes and thick gravys. De Vere’s Irish Pub is dedicating our entire summer to showcasing the Irish cuisine movement while providing our guests with lighter fare during the hot summer months. This journey through Irish cooking will involve a new theme each month with weekly changing specials for you to try. We hope you will join us for this culinary adventure and enjoy tasting foods from the ocean, the farm, and modern day Ireland.

JUNE: “Seaside Menu” JULY: “Farmhouse Menu” August: “Urban Menu”

* Buy Two entrées and Get 1/2 off a bottle of wine  ( M-Th)!

Presenting “The Lighter Side of Ireland” Summer Menus

Crisp-fried fish. Savory cream sauce. Thick sizzling bacon.

While these traditional Irish food staples will always make your mouth water, they might not be what you always want to order—especially during the hot Sacramento summer months. Luckily, we have special, less-heavy menus options for you to indulge in while the mercury rises. For the first time ever, we're presenting a "Lighter Side of Ireland" dining experience—all summer long!

Starting this month, the progressive 3-phase menu gives you an opportunity to try less traditional, more refreshing fare (proving that Irish cuisine is much more than filling potatoes and gravy). It's our nod to the current food movement happening in Ireland right now.

Here's what we're serving: June’s Seaside Menu will offer fresh seafood specials. (Check it out here.) July’s Farm House Menu will feature a variety of savory meats and vegetables. Finally, August’s Urban Menu will highlight the modern side of Irish food. What's even more impressive is that options will change weekly. Our chefs Wes and Ricky have been busy—and extra creative!

If you come in Monday through Thursday, we'll be offering an incredible wine special.  Buy any two entrées from the special menus and get half off any  bottle of wine!

We hope everyone comes to join us for this culinary adventure and enjoy tasting

food from the ocean, the farm, and modern-day Ireland.

 

de Vere's Seaside Menu

 

The Lighter side of Ireland

 

~Menu changes weekly~

All items subject to availability

Seaside Menu

all items Pair well with ~

Railbridge Sauvignon blanc 7/26

Featured June 1-4

Grilled albacore tuna 13.5

House bacon, roasted fingerling potatoes, spring onion, arugula, Meyer lemon vinaigrette

Beer steamed mussels app 7.5 / entrée 16

Chorizo, red onion, fennel, tomato, garlic, grilled bread

Featured June 5-11

Roasted Beet salad 8

Red onion, fennel, goat cheese, maché, local olive oil

Grilled oysters 14

Spicy garlic butter

Broiled black cod 16

Asparagus, roasted shallots, house bacon, lemon caper beur blanc

Featured June 12-18

Grilled caesar salad 8

Croutons, shaved Irish Piquant flavored cheese

Smoked salmon Paté  12

Grilled Boddington’s wheat bread, small salad, cumberland sauce

Seared sea scallops 16

Crispy fingerlings, sautéed ramps, corn, smoked black cod chowder

Featured June 19-25

Smoked salmon boxty 9

Lemon, capers, sour cream, greens

Raw oysters 12

With accompaniments

Pan seared Irish trout 16

Potato and corn hash, spring onion white wine sauce

Featured June 26-30

Best of… Aq

Tax not included. Not valid with any other offer. Split entrees not    permitted. Service charge of 18% will be added to parties of 8 or more.

Chef :: Wesley Nilssen

Chef :: Tarick Abukhdier

Ireland is in the middle of a culinary revolution! Irish cooking is a clear example of cooking local while creating flavorful and exciting dishes. Irish cuisine is much more than heavy potatoes and thick gravys.

De Vere’s Irish Pub is dedicating our entire summer to showcasing the Irish cuisine movement while providing our guests with lighter fare during the hot summer months. This journey through Irish cooking will involve a new theme each month with weekly changing specials for you to try. We hope you will join us for this culinary adventure and enjoy tasting foods from the ocean, the farm, and modern day Ireland.

JUNE: “Seaside Menu” JULY: “Farmhouse Menu” August: “Urban Menu”

* We will be pairing all our menus with wines from Rail Bridge Cellars, a local urban winery from Sacramento.

* Buy Two entrées and Get 1/2 off a bottle!

Sacramento's Largest Whiskey List

We have built our whiskey list over the past two years and are adding whiskey's every week.  We will create links between this list and our reviews of each whiskey as we post them to our blog.  We hope you will enjoy our whiskey bar in the heart of downtown Sacramento.  The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub.  Grab a friend and come down for an incredible experience!

Bourbon

Bourbon is an American whiskey, like Bulliet or Maker’s Mark, made from at least 51% corn and aged at least two years in new charred oak barrels.   Bourbon that meets the above requirements, has been aged for a minimum of two years, and has no added coloring, flavoring, or other spirit may be called Straight bourbon.

Basil Hayden’s 8yr

Booker’s

Bulleit

Buffalo Trace

Eagle Rare

Eagle Rare 17yr

Four Roses

George T. Stagg

Jim Beam

Jim Beam Black

Johnny Drum 101pr

Kentucky Vintage 17yr

Kentucky Vintage 21yr

Kentucky Vintage 25yr

Knob Creek

Maker’s Mark

Maker’s 46

Michter’s US 1

Noah’s Mill

Old Bardstown Estate

Old Forester

Old Forester Birthday

Pappy Van Winkle 12yr

Pappy Van Winkle 15yr

Pappy Van Winkle 20yr

Pappy Van Winkle 23yr

Pure Kentucky XO

Rip Van Winkle 10yr 90pr

Rip Van Winkle 12yr 107pr

Rowan’s Creek 12yr

Wild Turkey 101pr

Willett Reserve

Willett Family Estate 6yr

Willett Family Estate 13yr

William Larue Weller

Woodford Reserve

Rye Whiskey

Rye whiskey is made from a mash of at least 51% rye. Other ingredients are usually corn and malted barley. It must be aged in charred, new oak barrels. Rye whiskey that has been aged for at least 2 years may be further designated as "straight".

High West Silver

High West Bourye

High West Rendezvous

High West 16yr

High West 21yr

Michter’s US 1

Michter’s 10yr

Rip Van Winkle 13yr

Sazerac 6yr

Sazarac –Thomas Handy

Whiskey

Uisce beatha is Gaelic for “water of life”. Whiskey is a distilled spirit made from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat and corn.

Crown Royal

Crown Royal Reserve

Crown Cask No. 16

Leopold’s Peach

Pendleton

Pendryn

Seagram’s 7

Tennessee Whiskey

Tennessee whiskey is different from bourbon by one key exception - it’s charcoal filtered before aging in barrels, and it has to be distilled in Tennessee.

George Dickel

Jack Daniel’s

Jack Daniel’s SB

Gentleman Jack

Irish Whiskey

Irish whiskey must be distilled and aged in the republic of Ireland or in Northern Ireland. It must be aged for at least three years in wooden casks. If the spirits comprise a blend of two or more distillates, the product is referred to as a “Blended” Irish whiskey.

Bushmills

Bushmills Black

Bushmills 10yr

Bushmills 16yr

Bushmills 21yr

Connemara

Connemara Cask

Finian’s

Jameson

Jameson 12yr

Jameson Gold

Jameson 18yr

Jameson 21yr

Jameson Vintage

John Powers

John Powers 12yr

Kilbeggan

Knappogue Castle

Michael Collins

Michael Collins SM

Midleton Rare

Paddy

Red Breast 12yr

Red Breast 15yr

Slane Castle

Tyrconnell

Tyrconnell Madera

Tyrconnell Port

Tyrconnell Sherry

Tullamore Dew

Tullamore Dew 10yr

Tullamore Dew 12yr

Scotch

Scottish whisky is aged in oak casks for at least three years. In Scotland, however, it’s just called whisky. Depending on the region, the Scotch may have different flavors - those from Islay, pronounced “eye-la,” for example, tend to have a smoky, peaty flavor. While those from Speyside, like Macallan, are known for their smooth caramel flavors.

Islay

Ardbeg 10yr

Bowmore 12yr

Bruichladdich 12yr

Bruichladdich 14yr

Caol Ila 12yr

Lagavulin 12yr

Lagavulin 16yr

Lagavulin 1993

Laphroaig 10yr

Peat Monster

Speyside

Balvenie 12yr

Balvenie 15yr

Balvenie 21yr

Craigellachie 16yr

Dewar’s White

Dewar’s 12yr

Dewar’s 18yr

Dewar’s Signature

Glenfiddich 12yr

Glenfiddich 15yr

Glenfiddich 18yr

Glenfiddich 21yr

Glenfiddich DE 102pr

Glenlivet 12yr

Glenlivet 15yr

Gelnlivet 16 Nadura

Glenlivet 18yr

Glenrothes Select Rsv.

Glenrothes 1991

Macallan 12yr

Macallan 14yr

Macallan 18yr

Macallan 21yr

Singleton 12yr

Speyburn 10yr

Island

Highland Park 12yr

Inchmurrin 12yr

Scapa 1993

Talisker 10yr

 

Lowland

Glenkinchie 12yr

J.W. Black 12yr

J.W. Blue

J.W. Gold 18yr

J.W. Green 15yr

J.W. Red

Highland

Chivas Regal 12yr

Clynelish 14yr

Dalwhinnie 15yr

Deanston 12yr

Glen Garioch 8yr

Glenmorangie 10yr

Glenmorangie 18yr

Oban 14yr

Oban 1993 DE

Stronachie 12yr

Stronachie 17yr

Campbeltown

Cadenhead’s

Springbank CV

Springbank 10yr

Springbank 15yr

Grain

Milford 10yr

Pig’s Nose 5yr

Sheeps Dip

Sheeps Dip 1990

Yamazaki 12yr

Yamazaki 18y

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try all of these Whiskeys at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

Knob Creek Bourbon Review

 

Knob Creek

Knob Creek is the Kentucky town where Abraham Lincoln’s father, Thomas, owned a farm and worked at the local distillery. This nine-year-old Bourbon is made with the same high-rye formula as Basil Hayden’s. It has a nutty nose of sweet, tangy fruit and rye, with malt, spice and nuts on the palate, drying in the finish with notes of vanilla. 50.0% ABV

 

 

 

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

If you haven't joined our Whiskey Society you should sign up today!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

 

May is National Hamburger Month

May is National Hamburger Month

Original Article from Foodspotting.com
"Editor's Note: With nearly 500 foodspottings and numerous burgers under his belt, Super SpotterRodney Blackwell is clearly the perfect person to talk to about National Hamburger Month. Check out the contest he's running for burger junkies in Sacramento and be sure to follow his epic Foodspotting hamburger guide.

 

May is National Hamburger Month! As the creator of California-based burger review blog Burger Junkies, I jumped at the chance to share my love for burgers by teaming up with de Vere's Irish Pubin Sacramento to create #sacburgermonth. For each week in May, de Vere's chefs created a Featured Burger with beer pairings. You can check out those burgers in our #sacburgermonth guide.

It may be mid-May, but it’s never too late to join in the burger fun! To celebrate National Burger Month, add a burger that you’ve enjoyed to the new National Hamburger Month Foodspotting guide. It’s an open guide, so hopefully together we can create one of the best visual burger resources in the world!

Rodney Blackwell runs T-ShirtForums.com and when he’s not thinking about t-shirts, he’s out fueling his Foodspotting addiction. You can follow his burger adventures at BurgerJunkies.com or on@burgerjunkies.

 

Tomorrow Is Derby Day at de Vere's Pub

Each year, in Louisville, Kentucky, a two week long festival culminates in an epic thoroughbred horse race that is watched the world over. The Kentucky Derby, a Grade I stakes race, is ten furlongs or one and a quarter miles in length, and involves the fastest, top competing colts, geldings and fillies in the United States. Also touted the “Run for the Roses” since the winner is draped in a rosy blanket, this competition garners more spectators and bets than any other stakes race of its kind. This year, watch the “fastest two minutes in sports” at de Vere's Irish Pub, which will be hosting an unprecedented Derby Day event this year on Saturday, May 7th beginning at noon.

The pre-race festivities will include specials on Mint Juleps and Pimms Cups, which will start at only $5, as well as a big hat contest for the ladies!

You may have seen photographs of the old days when high society attended horse races as a matter of course, and all the well-to-do women would don extravagant lids, hoop skirts, and frilly dresses. So, classy gals, wear your hat that takes up the most real estate possible, and contend for to-be-announced prizes and glory! Don't have a big hat already? Try Sacramento City Dry Goods or the Village Hat Shop in Old Sacramento in an effort to support local businesses, something that de Vere's endeavors to do as well at every possible turn!

Mint Juleps proffered will be made with Woodford or Pure Kentucky bourbon, and our bartenders have been gearing up to make the best ones you've ever tasted. For more on the making of these drinks, check out these youtube.com videos:

Mint Julep: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lP2VQ9eiUo&feature=related

Pimms Cup: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjXuBbs3wlk&feature=fvwrel

The race itself will commence at 3pm and suspense will fill the pub as our patrons gather to witness history in the making. All will be on the edge of their bar stools, and from under the rim of their big hats, as they sip a well-constructed cocktail and cheer for their favorite thoroughbred, a new contender will strive ahead to become the new victor of the Kentucky Derby. De Vere's extends an invite to you, your friends and family to enjoy this annual race within the warmth of our family's pub.

For more information or to RSVP to this event, please visit the event page at: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=154826847910731

 

Sacramento Burger Month's Week 1 Burger: The Tostada Burger

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger

Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

To Vote for this burger click here

To Learn what's Next click here

To Vote for the 4th week burger click here

 

Ms. Munchie Dines at De Vere's

Saturday, April 30, 2011

 

de Vere's - Pub Fare & Burger Bonanza

Follow the author's Blog

or on her Twitter! @ms_munchie

A few months ago I had started a Twitter exchange with Henry de Vere of de Vere’s Pub before I had ever met him. He invited me to come into the pub and I explained I rarely entered pubs and bars because I don’t drink. “But we have great pub food”, he replied.
Shortly after, I finally met him and he repeated his invitation. Come on in and he’ll set up a tasting for me with his chef. As my readers know, I never turn up an offer for free food. It took several weeks, but I finally made it in. That said, you can consider this review biased, if you wish, since I did not go in there blindly, but for a formal tasting.
I ventured over after work on a Thursday. Henry greeted me warmly and told me what he had arranged. He thought I might like to see the chef make some blood sausage in the kitchen before trying some food.
 

mixing the blood sausage ingredients
I was introduced to Chef Wes Nilssen. He’s had quite a few positions around town, including some of the Paragary’s restaurants. He asked me if I liked blood sausage. Now my mother, being Filipina, loved all that sort of stuff. Me, not so much. I would have tasted it, but actually got off the evening not having too.  He had all the ingredients all prepped. There was barley, oats, onion, milk soaked bread crumbs, bits of pig fat, spices, and pig’s blood from John Bledsoe. He started with the barley, poured in the blood, and mixed it thoroughly before adding the next ingredient. He carefully blended each ingredient in before moving to the next. In actuality, the sausage is mostly the filler.  Everything was a bright crimson. 

The sausage maker was brought out and loaded and then the intestinal casings were slid onto the extruder. One of the kitchen assistants cranked down the press as Chef handled the sausage as it was extruded. I noted that he wasn’t making links. Instead, they make a giant coil, boil it, and then they cut portions from it after it’s cooled.

We got two coils from today’s batch and Chef said it would last them about three weeks. They make their other sausages as well. Their plan is to get licensed to do their own charcuterie. Thoughts of salami and smoked goods swim in my head. Yum.
I went back out to the bar and sat down with Henry with a cheese platter. On it were two types of salami, four cheese, some peppadews, olives, and a housemade marmalade. There were also slices of the Irish brown bread they bake themselves twice a day. Since it is so heavy and has very little moisture to it, they bake it twice a day to keep the freshest available throughout the day.
Henry talked about our British/Irish backgrounds. My dad is from Ipswich in ’58 and his parents came from the Dublin area in the late 70’s. In fact, Henry, the youngest, is the only one of his siblings to be born in the U.S.
Henry explained that they wanted to make the best Irish bread like his grandmother made. But we all know our grandparents used to just throw ingredients together and never measured. So he and his aunt set about making 20 different versions of bread, writing down the measurements, and having grandma taste them. They narrowed it down over and over until they finally came to the final one that was like grandma’s. That’s the recipe they use in the pub now.
We discussed pub food and the type of food from the British Isles. I grew up knowing a little about bangers and mash and shepherd’s pie. Henry explained that they wanted to add some lighter pub fare to the menu as we start going into the summer months. My next item was one of their ideas. They took the well-known combo of smoked salmon, capers, and onions and wrapped inside a boxty. Boxty is a potato pancake. I really liked it. The warm, soft pancake with the crunch of onion, smoky salmon, and salty capers with a bit of crème worked well as a nice little package.
They asked me what else I would like to taste and so I asked for the Irish stew and shepherd’s pie. The pie came out first with the mashed potatoes decoratively piped on top and then put under the broiler for a quick toast of the peaks. Sprinkled on top was some parsley. Henry explained that his mom always put the garnish on everyone’s plate because it made a simple meal more special, especially when feeding a large family on a budget.
mini version of their shepherd's pie
I later read through some of the Yelp reviews and noted that people were irked by the ratio of mashed potatoes to meat mixture.  I can agree with that. Yes, it could use more filling and less potato. But at least the filling was good. In fact, I was impressed that the vegetables weren’t overcooked and soft, but still had that slight crispness to them. And since I wasn’t paying for anything, I wasn’t paying attention to prices. So if I was having to pay for it, I probably would also be a bit irritated by too much potato.
Our conversation continued about the traditional pub dishes. Everyone who grew up eating shepherd’s pie or Irish stew has a very subjective idea of how the dish should be. Everyone’s recipe and childhood memory is different. Both of these dishes can be done with beef or lamb. Henry explained that they serve dishes closest to the de Vere’s family recipes and how HE grew up with them. He often has customers say that a dish needs to be different – “you need to add this” or “it’s supposed to have __”. But you can’t satisfy everyone.
Next came the Irish stew, with beef. (As I had just told him I made my St. Pat’s stew with lamb.) It arrived with the family garnish of a sprinkling of chives. There was plenty of meat and chunky vegetables. I noted the full bodied flavor of the gravy and Chef explained that they cook the stew with veal bones.
Being into desserts, I asked them what they had. Their best dessert is their bread pudding. They slice it, coat it in panko crumbs, deep fry it, and then serve it with vanilla ice cream and caramel sauce. Now I’m not a fan of bread pudding, but I couldn’t stop eating this. Henry said it had become so popular that they could never take it off the menu. A signature dish. When people order it he know that, again, they might be thinking of a bread pudding that they grew up with and he has to explain to them that it’s going to be deep fried so that they aren’t shocked when it arrives.
By this time I was stuffed and reluctantly had to push the rest of the pudding away. I’d learned a lot about Henry and his family, his bar and his vision. That vision includes a second pub being fitted in Davis. Like the midtown location, the Davis one will have all the interior shipped over from Ireland. When I asked why the expense of importing versus just making replicas, he explained that it just doesn’t look and feel the same as the workmanship and pieces he brings over. As we gazed around the bar area he pointed out all the pictures of his relations. He explained that his family has pubs back for many generations and he’s just continuing the legacy here in the U.S.
Another Day, Another Tasting
A couple days later I get a tweet. Do I want to come for a burger tasting? Rodney, known on Twitter as @burgerjunkies, is partnering with de Vere’s for burger month. It turns out that May is National Burger Month. Henry and Rodney have a plan for a different burger for each week of May and we now get to taste them.
Week 1 contains Cinco de Mayo and so we start with a TostadaBurger. You get bun, crisp tostada, tomato, corn pico de gallo con queso, burger, another crispy tostada, more corn pico, and Serrano mayo and bun. LOVED this burger. It has a nice spicy kick to it flavor-wise. But this is mostly a texture burger. You get a fabulous crunch from the tostadas and then a veggie crunch from the corn.
Week 2 is going to be the Firestone Burger, since de Vere’s is in the Firestone district where the old Firestone building used to be. This one is all about flavor. Inside the bun there is arugula tossed in a little oil and salt and pepper, a burger made with beef and some smoked pork mixed in, smoked goat cheddar cheese, a pile of fried onions, and topped with a red wine/balsamic shallot sauce that has been cooked down to thick, caramel jam. What I really liked with this burger was that even though it was full of lots of bold flavors, you could still distinguish each ingredient and savor the blend. The goat cheese is noticeable, but not overpowering. You can taste the bit of smokiness and yet still taste the vibrant shallot sauce as well. Everything worked really well off of each other.
Week 3 is the Stadium Burger. Served on a pretzel bun shipped all the way from Chicago, it has a patty with an ounce and a half of cheddar stuffed inside. Both sides of the bun are spread with whole grain mustard and the burger is topped with a housemade relish of cucumbers and those lovely peppadews I had on my cheese platter the week before. As we split the burgers the cheddar oozed from the center. I liked this burger, but found it awkward to eat. I also told Henry that the relish needed more of the peppadews and less cucumber.
The final week of May will probably be decided by a poll of de Vere’s fans. One option being considered is a burger topped with prime rib and served with au jus for dunking. Another possibility is one topped with short rib.
Oh, and they’ve paired each burger with a specific beer. I don’t drink, so I didn’t pay attention to their beer tasting.
Out of the three I liked the Tostada and Firestone equally. The Tostada for texture and spice and the Firestone for bold flavors that play well together. I loved the stuffed cheese burger of the Stadium, but found the pretzel roll to be awkward. All three are worth trying for a burger filled month.
I know that Rodney had prizes in mind for Burger Month, so check out his site for more details. Then plan to go to de Vere’s each week to try these fabulous burgers. They are special for May, so grab them while you can.

Celebrating National Hamburger Month locally with #sacburgermonth

by Rodney on April 29, 2011 in Site Announcements

May is National Hamburger Month and what better way for Sacramento, CA, one of themost Twitter connected cities, to celebrate than with #sacburgermonth

What is #sacburgermonth?

You can get the full details at sacburgermonth.com, but here’s the highlights:

Think of it as a celebration of all things hamburger in our wonderful city of trees.

#sacburgermonth is brought to you by de Vere's Irish Pub and BurgerJunkies.com

We’ve teamed up with the chefs at de Vere’s Irish Pub in Sacramento to bring you 4 amazing weekly Featured Burgersand some fun giveaways (including a digital camera giveaway from BurgerJunkies.com)!

The Burgers:

(each premium burger comes with fries and a carefully selected beer pairing for just $15)

 

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

 

Week 2: Sunday May 8 – Saturday May 14

The Firestone Burger

Firestone Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

This juicy cheeseburger is cooked in a red wine, shallots, and balsamic vinegar based sauce that gives it a powerful sweet and tangy flavor.  The double ground smoked beef patty is infused with smoked pork and topped with bacon, smoked cheddar goat cheese and fried onions. This flavorful burger is served on a lightly toasted, locally sourced, freshly baked bun.

We paired this burger with an Abbey ale from New Belgium Brewery out of Colorado. The chocolatey undertones allow this beer to hold its own with the smokiness of the Firestone Burger.

 

Week 3: Sunday May 15 – Saturday May 21

The Stadium Burger

Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

Local sports fans, this one is for you! This double ground beef patty is stuffed with 1.5 ounces of sharp cheddar cheese, coated with whole grain mustard, and smothered with a house made relish containing delicious peppadews. The chef’s searched far and wide for the perfect soft pretzel bun to compliment this beautiful burger creation.

Henry personally selected an organic wheat beer that goes perfectly with the pickled peppered flavors that top this burger. Mothership Wit from New Belgium Brewery is brewed with wheat and barley malt, as well as coriander and orange peel spicing resulting in a balance of citrus and sour flavors held in suspension by a bright burst of carbonation.

 

Week 4: Sunday May 22- Saturday May 28

YOU DECIDE!

Vote for our last Weekly Featured Burger

We haven’t picked the burger for Week 4 yet.

Your votes for the 4th Week #sacburgermonth burger will decide which one gets featured on the menu!

The de Vere’s chefs have dreamed up 2 crazy burger creations for #sacburgermonth Week 4, but only 1 can be on the menu.

Help us choose the Week 4 Featured Burger by taking our 5 second survey and be entered into a chance to win a t-shirt and free $25 Gift Card from de Vere’s Irish Pub!

Will it be:

A Prime Rib Burger with carmalized onions manchango cheese, Horse radish mayo and Au Jus

Or will it be:

A Philly Burger Pepercorned crusted all beef patty with house made Pastrami , house made sour kraut, and swiss cheese with a roasted red pepper mayo.

Cast Your Vote

 

The Contests:

 

  1. 1. Enter a random drawing to win a Canon DSLR Digital Camera from BurgerJunkies.com by tweeting about #sacburgermonth on Twitter. See How To Enter
  2.  

  3. 2. Enter a random drawing to win a free $25 de Vere’s Irish Pub gift card and t-shirt by helping us select the #sacburgermonth Week 4 Featured Burger! Vote for a chance to win
  4.  

  5. 3. Enter a random drawing to win a free $25 de Vere’s Irish Pub gift card and t-shirt by voting for your favorite #sacburgermonth Weekly Featured Burger!Vote for a chance to win
  6.  

  7. 4. Be the first to spot all 4 #sacburgermonth Featured Burgers at de Vere’s Irish Pub on Foodspotting to win a free “I Love Hamburgers” t-shirt from BurgerJunkies.com Start Foodspotting
  8.  

 

DERBY DAY AT DE VERE'S IRISH PUB

Each year, in Louisville, Kentucky, a two week long festival culminates in an epic thoroughbred horse race that is watched the world over. The Kentucky Derby, a Grade I stakes race, is ten furlongs or one and a quarter miles in length, and involves the fastest, top competing colts, geldings and fillies in the United States. Also touted the “Run for the Roses” since the winner is draped in a rosy blanket, this competition garners more spectators and bets than any other stakes race of its kind. This year, watch the “fastest two minutes in sports” at de Vere's Irish Pub, which will be hosting an unprecedented Derby Day event this year on Saturday, May 7th beginning at noon. The pre-race festivities will include specials on Mint Juleps and Pimms Cups, which will start at only $5, as well as a big hat contest for the ladies!

You may have seen photographs of the old days when high society attended horse races as a matter of course, and all the well-to-do women would don extravagant lids, hoop skirts, and frilly dresses. So, classy gals, wear your hat that takes up the most real estate possible, and contend for to-be-announced prizes and glory! Don't have a big hat already? Try Sacramento City Dry Goods or the Village Hat Shop in Old Sacramento in an effort to support local businesses, something that de Vere's endeavors to do as well at every possible turn!

Mint Juleps proffered will be made with Woodford or Pure Kentucky bourbon, and our bartenders have been gearing up to make the best ones you've ever tasted. For more on the making of these drinks, check out these youtube.com

videos:

Mint Julep: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lP2VQ9eiUo&feature=related

Pimms Cup: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjXuBbs3wlk&feature=fvwrel

The race itself will commence at 3pm and suspense will fill the pub as our patrons gather to witness history in the making. All will be on the edge of their bar stools, and from under the rim of their big hats, as they sip a well-constructed cocktail and cheer for their favorite thoroughbred, a new contender will strive ahead to become the new victor of the Kentucky Derby. De Vere's extends an invite to you, your friends and family to enjoy this annual race within the warmth of our family's pub.

For more information or to RSVP to this event, please visit the event page at: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=154826847910731

 

Irish pub to replace Soga's

"Brothers Simon and Henry de Vere White are co-owners of the popular de Vere's Irish Pub in Sacramento and will be branching out to Davis by September 2011. The de Vere Whites hail from Ireland and plan to bring an Irish flair to the Downtown Davis dining experience.

"We're an Irish pub, we cater to a wide variety of people, from families with kids to the business community," said Simon. "We're very food focused here, so I think what helps us be successful is being family owned and operated."

De Vere's Irish Pub signed a 10-year lease at 217 E St., a 4,800 square foot location formerly occupied by Soga's. The new location is 1,000 square feet larger than the Sacramento location.

De Vere's will take over the building formerly occupied by Soga's, an Italian and American food restaurant that permanently closed on Nov. 21 2010, after filing for bankruptcy.

"We liked the look of the building, we wanted to be downtown," said Simon. "We thought that downtown Davis had a great feel to it, and it seems that that's where the focus of the food industry is."

De Vere's will provide a hearty menu filled with traditional Irish food, as well as the familiar cheeseburger and sandwich for the more timid restaurant-goers.

Most of the food served will be made fresh in-house, including curing their own bacon, butchering their own meat and making their own pudding.

"We like to say we make everything here, except for Ranch," said Simon.

Despite Soga's recent bankruptcy, the de Vere Whites were not discouraged from branching out into Davis with a second pub after two successful years in Sacramento.

"We were always very intrigued with Davis. Great community and culture there. Family-oriented town, family business," said Simon. "We thought that going into a place that has a university system was very compelling and thought we would be a good fit for Davis."

For those looking for an authentic Irish pub experience, de Vere's is the place to go. De Vere's Irish Pub provides both authentic Irish cuisine and authentic Irish interior design complete with family pictures, paintings and Irish antiques.

"In Ireland, kids are at the pubs. You're born in the pub, grow up in the pub, get married in the pub," said Simon. "Every Sunday is family Sunday, we discount the kids menu. We definitely try to attract the family aspect."

De Vere's, winner of Sacramento Magazine's Best Pub Food award of 2010, prides itself on its hospitality, food and cozy atmosphere.

The opening of de Vere's is good news for the alcohol savvy as well, offering an extensive alcohol menu with 89 varieties of whiskey and 66 varieties of scotch."

 

DYLAN AARON can be reached at city@theaggie.org.

 

The History of Bourbon

"Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria.

You can try a lot of the  Whiskey's in this post  at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

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de Vere's To Open in Davis

"The owners of de Vere's Irish Pub have announced that a Davis location for their popular watering hole will open in September.

A lease was signed in March for a 4,800 square foot space at 217 E St. in downtown Davis, a space formerly occupied by Soga's restaurant. Like its downtown Sacramento location, the Davis branch of de Vere's will focus on Irish-themed drinks and decor, and a menu that includes house-made bacon, blood sausages and other pub fare. The Davis location will be about 1,000 square feet larger than its Sacramento pub, and includes a wraparound patio.

Co-owner Henry de Vere White, who once ran a college pub in Seattle, feels confident that Davis is a good fit for his Irish pub.

"We love the food movement out there and just relate well to the area," said de Vere White. "We're going to cater to the Davis community as a whole, from the professors and college students to those with families and kid-friendly brunches. We want locals to come in and have a pint and have a nice change of pace."

de Vere signed a 10-year lease for the space with two five year options. The pub will be neighbors with a variety of other watering holes and restaurants, including Cafe Bernardo and Burgers and Brew, and officials with the City of Davis' Economic Development Department are encouraged with the news about de Vere's coming to town.

"Davis prides itself in its range of dining and beverage establishments," said Katherine Hess, Community Development Department Administrator. "We've heard a lot of comments that people would like to see something that's not Thai food and pizza, so this is encouraging. We want a wide variety of restaurants for visitors and residents alike."

Remodeling the space is underway and the de Vere family plans to travel to Ireland to pick up decorative items for the pub. de Vere's has hired architects both in Ireland and locally to complete the project.

"Pub life is more than just having a bar," said de Vere White. "We want the college students to come back on a road trip later in life and remember de Vere's as a place where they formed friendships.""

Article by: Chris Macias Read more: http://blogs.sacbee.com/dining/archives/2011/04/de-veres-irish.html#ixzz1IfQKkX5O

 

De Vere's expanding to Davis

"De Vere’s Irish Pub, a locally owned downtown business founded in the midst of the recession, will open its second location at the end of the summer in the space that was formerly the home of Soga’s in Davis.

“We’re excited,” said co-owner Simon de Vere White. “We’ve been eying Davis for a long time.”

The new space, at 217 E St. in downtown Davis, is 4,800 square feet, about 1,000 square feet bigger than the Sacramento pub.

His brother, co-owner Henry de Vere White, said the expansion is a risk, but one he hopes will prove as successful as the current location on 15th and L streets in Sacramento.

“I think we filled a niche here in Sacramento," Simon de Vere White said, adding that the brothers hope to do the same in Davis.

The basic concept will be the same, as they said community involvement at all levels is important to success.

“We are a neighborhood Irish pub,” Henry de Vere White said. “We do lunch and dinner, and you see the little ones coming in, and then at night it gets a little bit (of an older crowd).”

According to Christi Skibbins, executive director of the Davis Chamber of Commerce, E Street is often referred to as “Eat Street.”

“E Street is a street a lot of people call Eat Street because there are so many restaurants and bars,” she said. “It will be a good spot for them. They’re right across from E Street Plaza, so there is plenty of parking, and it has easy access from all of Davis.”

The Davis pub will have the same menu as de Vere’s in Sacramento when it comes to drinks and food, but possibly with more emphasis on hamburgers with the large student population, Simon de Vere White said.

“It’s too early to tell, but that’s something we will work out when we get closer to opening,” he added.

Activities like the popular Monday night trivia challenge will be carried over to the Davis location as well.

The décor will be similar, as family friends in Ireland will once again be designing the interior space.

“This whole pub was built in Ireland then broken down and shipped over here,” Henry de Vere White said Monday in the Sacramento pub. “All the decorations on the walls are replicas of family items from Ireland.”

Authenticity is important to the brothers, with Simon being born in Ireland and Henry being born in Boston – the first one born in America from a family that traces its Irish heritage back to the year 1140.

The brothers have been living in Sacramento since 1985.

“In here, we have high ceilings, but in Davis, the ceilings are much lower,” Henry de Vere White said. “This is typical of a Victorian pub in downtown Dublin, but the Davis one will have more of a neighborhood feel.”

Philippe Masoud is the owner of two restaurants with locations in both Sacramento and Davis – Crepeville and Burgers and Brew. He said he expects the pub to be successful as well, since the same types of places appeal to both cities.

“Davis is a really good town for us. Sacramento took us longer to be discovered,” he said, adding that he opened his businesses in Davis first.

One challenge to doing business in Davis that Sacramento doesn’t face, however, is that business slows down considerably in summer, when the college students are on break, he said.

But that can be overcome, he said, adding, “I think they will do really good.”

For more information on de Vere’s Irish Pub in Davis, check the pub’sFacebook page or follow it on Twitter."

Brandon Darnell is a staff reporter for The Sacramento Press.

 

Bulleit

Bulleit Bulleit Bourbon is made by following the small-batch technique inspired by Augustus Bulleit over 150 years ago. Only the highest quality ingredients are used. Bulleit Bourbon’s subtlety and complexity stem from its unique blend of rye, corn and barley malt, along with special strains of yeast. Because Bulleit Bourbon is especially high in rye content, it has a bold and spicy character with a distinctively smooth, clean finish.

The hints of oak and spice, the russet color, the crisp, clean flavor that feels smooth in the throat, the notes of vanilla and honey – all add up to a bourbon that has a distinct and individual character. The complex taste of Bulleit Bourbon is something that can only be appreciated once tried.

Bulleit Bourbon is an American brand of straight bourbon whiskey characterized by its high rye content at approximately 30%, the absence of phenol and aging of at least six years.[1] The design of the flask is reminiscent of an old-fashioned brown medicine flask with raised lettering and a cork stopper. The bourbon is 45% alcohol by volume, or 90 proof in most countries, in 2008 however, in Australia, Bulleit Bourbon is now imported at 40% and bottled in the UK, rather than in the US. This change has also been marked by the label on the bottle no longer being applied diagonally, but horizontally, as pictured, and also a change in the manufacture of the actual glass bottle. The new bottle design is screw top as opposed to plastic mounted cork, and the bottle lettering is raised higher and its bottle manufacture is generally lower quality, but will only be seen in the UK bottling (40%) export markets. Bulleit sold on the UK market, presently (after this change in bottling location) is presumably also 40% alcohol by volume, not 45%.

History:

According to company lore, the first batch of Bulleit was first made in the 1800s by Augustus Bulleit, but discontinued after his death. In 1987, the great-great-grandson of the original creator, Tom Bulleit created the first modern-day batch, which was introduced to US markets in 1999, and Australia, UK and Germany in 2000.[2][3] In 1997 Bulleit was bought by Seagram, and is now distilled in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky.[4] Following an acquisition of Seagram, the Bulleit brand is now owned by Diageo.

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

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A toast of whiskey

A toast of whiskey

Author: Chris Macias
Published: March 16th, 2011 02:09 PM

"A pint of Guinness sounds good for St. Patrick's Day, but this year we're ready to give a little Irish whiskey a spin. In the world of spirits, Irish whiskey's known for being exceptionally smooth compared to its counterparts around the world.

In Ireland, the majority of whiskeys are distilled three times during production, making for a clean and delicately sweet drink that goes down easy before yelling "Erin go bragh."

Whiskey's been produced in Ireland for centuries, and the country was home at one point to more than 1,000 distilleries. That number has been reduced to just a handful in Ireland today, but they still produce a range of whiskey styles from such brands as Bushmills, Jameson and Redbreast.

To get a head start on St. Patrick's Day, we're here at de Vere's Irish Pub, where the TVs broadcast a Champions League soccer match with Barcelona vs. Arsenal.

De Vere's carries 32 different Irish whiskeys, from smoky peat whiskeys to a bottle of Tyrconnell that's been aged in sherry casks. De Vere's even hosts its own whiskey society to introduce enthusiasts to the diversity found in this spirit.

"We get a lot of people who started as wine drinkers and then found something new they liked learning about," said co-owner Simon de Vere White.

"In an Irish whiskey, you'll be looking for something that's well-balanced with a little heat and some spice. It'll have less of the caramel and vanilla flavors that you'll find in American whiskey and bourbon."

So where to start with Irish whiskey? Well, make your first decision one that could save your life. If drinking away from home, designate a driver or keep a taxi service's number on hand.

St. Patrick's Day ranks as one of the most dangerous days on the road due to alcohol consumption. According to the CHP, a total of five people were killed and 142 people injured in 240 alcohol-involved collisions statewide on St. Patrick's Day in 2009 and 2010.

After you've checked this off your list, Liquid Assets recommends you check out these three Irish whiskeys on St. Patrick's Day and beyond:

Slane Castle Irish Whiskey (roughly $30 for 750 ml bottle, $7-$10 per shot at bars): De Vere White likes to start newcomers with this smooth and cask-y spirit that's been aged in American bourbon barrels. This whiskey definitely carries a little kick and a spicy finish, but paired with a smooth and balanced mouthfeel, just like a proper Irish whiskey should.

Connemara Peated Single Malt Irish Whiskey (about $40 for a 750 ml bottle in stores, $7-$10 per shot at bars): Here's a tasty example of a peated whiskey, which uses grains that have been roasted over a peat fire. The result is a smoky and earthy drink that's something like the whiskey equivalent of a fine cigar. Look for an exceptionally long finish with a bit of sweetness and spice mixed in with that smoky character.

Redbreast 12-year-old Pure Pot Still Irish Whiskey (roughly $40 per 750 ml bottle in stores, $9 to $11 per shot at bars): Take a sip of this full-bodied yet impeccably balanced whiskey and you'll see why it was named "Whiskey of the Year" by "Whisky Bible" author Jim Murray.

Full of complexity, with flavors of sweet caramel, spice and a touch of sherry, this whiskey is one to sip and savor."

Click here to find out more!

Original Article

ST. BALDRICK'S DAY TO DRUM UP SMILES AND CHILDHOOD CANCER RESEARCH FUNDING

Each year, 160,000 children are diagnosed with cancer, which is the leading cause of death for youngsters in the US and Canada. At 5pm on March 14, 2011 at deVere's Irish Pub, teams of brave and caring souls will bare their domes in an annual head-shaving, fund raising, philanthropic event that, since its advent, has generated over 56 million dollars to help kids fight and prevent cancer.