Sacramento

Sacramento & Davis Pub Quiz every Monday at de Vere's Irish Pub

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If you're looking for a pub quiz on Monday night in Sacramento or Davis, head down to de Vere's Irish Pub. Ranked as one of the top 10 pub quizzes in the Sacramento area, our weekly competition lets you and your smartest friends compete for points, pints, prizes and bragging rights! Both our Davis and Sacramento pub quizzes start at 7pm sharp, so it's best to arrive early to make sure you have a table.

Stay tuned. We'll be posting the current pub quiz rankings here every week.

 

 

St. Baldrick's Day 2012: Battle of the Pubs

About St. Baldrick's Day

Shear amazingness! How much money would it take to shave your head? What if all that money went to making a difference in the lives of children battling cancer? That’s what St. Baldrick’s Day is all about—going bald for a good cause.

Every year, we gather the community for a one-day event that brings together teams of people willing to shave their heads bald as a sign of solidarity with children who are fighting cancer. All participants, which include local businesses, schools, politicians, de Vere’s patrons, and even plenty of women, raise money in support of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, then congregate at de Vere’s Irish Pub (Midtown Sacramento and Davis) to shave their heads. And yes, we’re talkin’ buzzed bald!

Sacramento vs. Davis

This year, we're doing a battle of the pubs: Which de Vere's pub (Sacramento or Davis) can raise more money? The challenge is on!

SACRAMENTO

Monday, March 12, 5pm

To sign up as a shavee or donate to the Sacramento team, click here.

DAVIS

Thursday March 15th 5pm

To sign up as a shavee or donate to the Davis team, click here.

We hope you’ll all come out and get involved. It’s truly an inspiring and entertaining evening to participate in as well as watch. (There’s literally an assembly line of headshavers and shavees!)

Please help de Vere’s Irish Pub support the St. Baldrick’s Foundation by making a donation on our behalf to support childhood cancer research. After all, in the United States, more children die of childhood cancer than any other disease. Click on “Make a Donation” or donate by mail or phone. Thank you for your support!

 

Now Hiring: Head Chef for de Vere's Irish Pub

The de Vere's Irish Pub family is about to grow by one more. We're on the hunt for a motivated and talented Head Chef to join our team in anticipation of our upcoming Davis location, opening next month. This is truly an exceptional kitchen experience...we curate all our own meats, stuff all of our sausage, bake our own bread, and more. Basically we make everything from scratch, so this position will have endless opportunities to show off their skills! Please help us spread the word--we want to find the perfect fit! Read the posting below for more details.

Applicants can submit their application (download it here) with resume Monday - Friday between 10am & 11am or 2pm & 4pm to the Sacramento location at 1521 L Street.

The Head Chef will be responsible for the operation of the kitchen, including: product quality, kitchen appearance & cleanliness, financial results, BOH personnel hiring, training and management, facilities maintenance, safety, special events/promotions. They maintain food quality standards and a safe and sanitary kitchen environment for all employees. Other duties include menu/specials planning, inventory, preparation and maintenance of food and labor costs, new hire orientation, employee evaluations and ongoing food-related training of kitchen and service staff. Collaborates with General Manager to hire and develop a well-trained cohesive BOH team of talented, dedicated employees. Actively participates in management meetings and works cooperatively with office staff. Interacts with the local community to drive sales and increase awareness of the store. REQUIRED EXPERIENCE, QUALIFICATIONS & ATTITUDE: •5 years kitchen management experience, preferably in a high volume ($2+ million), upscale dining environment; minimum 2 years prior Chef experience •Outstanding culinary skills, culinary training desirable •Food safety certification required •Excellent planning and organizational skills •Understands restaurant accounting principles and has good math skills •Computer literate (MS Excel, Word and Micros POS) •Knowledgeable of California and Federal employment laws •Sophisticated, service oriented management style •Solid communication skills (i.e. listening, speaking, writing & reading) •Self directed, effective problem solver •Trustworthy, reliable; exercises good judgment and is calm under pressure •Friendly, professional and tirelessly polite towards guests •Accessible, consistent, fair, impartial and helpful to managers and staff

OTHER REQUIREMENTS: Chefs must be able to communicate clearly and effectively to BOH and FOH employees and guests. Must be physically mobile and capable of standing and/or sustaining a quick pace for periods of up to four or more hours in duration, as well as have the ability to lift 10 pounds frequently and up to 50 pounds occasionally. Good vision, with or without prescription eyewear, and sense of smell are also requirements. Minimum 50 hour weeks: day, night and weekend shifts, as necessary. Wardrobe must be appropriate to restaurant. Must have a vehicle to occasionally pick up supplies. Skills/Qualifications: •People Management, Planning, Foster Teamwork, Giving Feedback, Customer Service, Developing Budgets, Self-Motivated, Energy Level, Multi-tasking, Resolving Conflict, Verbal Communication

 

Paddy & Rebreast Irish whiskey

Paddy

Nose: Very linseedy, flowery and appetizing. Palate: Smooth, perfumy. Finish: Mustard. Comment: A classic Irish, though less full in flavour than Jameson.

Nose: Grainy from the off, but just a little more pot still sturdiness than of yore. A touch fruity but overall quite uninspiring. Palate: Much more toffee-vanilla than in recent years; enormously soft and completely lacking richness.

Finish: Dries as the oak takes over; becomes even bitter. Comment:  An unwieldy blend which disappoints thanks to its refusal to offer anything but a grainy, almost metallic hardness against an uncomplex softness.

RedBreast 12yr

There was a time when all Irish whiskeys were ‘pure pot still,’ made with a mixture of malted and unmalted barley, but today Redbreast is a rare survivor of the genre. As such it would be something to cherish even if it were not as excellent as it is. Redbreast dates back to the early 20th century, when the bonding company Gilbey’s of Ireland used the name for Jameson spirit which they matured and bottled, but since the 1990s the brand has been owned by Jameson’s parent company, Irish Distillers Ltd. Redbreast 12-year-old is distilled in Irish Distillers’ vast Midleton complex in County Cork, and maturation takes place principally in former Sherry casks, along with a percentage of ex-Bourbon wood. The result is a robust and deliciously individualistic whiskey, which offers a nose of linseed oil, mixed fruit, Sherry and vanilla. Big and voluptuous in the mouth, with characteristic Irish oiliness, cooked fruits, ginger and a developing nuttiness as it dries gently in a lengthy and well-mannered finish. A classic. 40.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

 

Outdoor Dining – Downtown Sacramento SCVNGR Trek

 

Summer is finally in full swing and that means the return of one of our favorite ways to past a balmy Sacramento evening: dining al fresco. If you’re anything like us, you love taking advantage of many fantastic outdoor patios that are so abundant in our fair city, but have a hard time remembering all of the great restaurants that have fabulous outside areas. Or maybe your stuck in a rut and just need help discovering new places to feel the breeze while you have a tasty bite.

We thought we’d both help you solve this summer delima, while also upping the fun factor, with our Outdoor Dining SCVNGR Trek. SCVNGR is a new free smartphone application available for both iPhone and Android. It combines the fun of Foursquare and Facebook with a traditional Scavenger Hunt.

 

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:

  • Go to your app store and download SCVNGR. (You can read more about it at their website: SCVNGR.com)
  • To play, simply go to “Treks” and find the “Outdoor Dining Downtown” trek. Select it.
  • You will see a list of seven places to eat that offer a variety of different outdoor dining options and specials.
  • At each location, there are several different tasks, questions or activities you can do to earn points! For instance, at Ten 22 if you take a picture of your appetizer in front of their fire pit, you earn 4 points!
  • Visit as many places as you can, and complete tasks at each location to try to get more points than anyone else.

Participants have until 8am July 11th to get as many points as possible! At that point the Top 7 people with the highest scores will win gift certificates to one of the participating locations.

 

HINTS AND TIPS:

  • Read through all the places and tasks before you start to work out the best strategy.
  • Some places and some tasks are worth more points than others. Get as many of the high point tasks completed as possible for a leg up.
  • Play with your friends, spouse or family. Compete against each other or cross tasks off together to up the fun factor.
  • Pay attention to the time of day. de Vere’s offers great Brunch tasks, while 3 Fires Lounge is great for happy hour or lunchtime tasks. Firehouse, which can be pricy for dinner, also encourages an afternoon happy hour with their tasks, so don’t be discouraged! There’s something for every price range, and note, NO purchase is necessary to complete the tasks and play to win!

Have a great time exploring some of Sacramento’s best, underrated, or oft-overlooked outdoor dining spots! Good luck!

Original Article by the Sacramento Downtown Partnership

John Powers Irish whiskey

John Powers

Triple distilled and matured in oak casks, Powers Gold Label has a spicy, honeyed, full-bodied flavour. Enjoy it neat, with water or with your favourite mixer.

This is one of the most popular whiskey’s in Ireland, drank more than Jamesons.

Make note that there is 3 swallows around the neck of the bottle, this is to remind you that all good Irish whiskeys should be drank in three swallows.  See more in distillery section.

John Powers 12yr

After being around for about a decade, it’s nice to see this whiskey finally being sold in the U.S. Soft, sweet and silky smooth, with creamy vanilla, caramel, toasted marshmallow, and honey-kissed tropical fruit (mango, pineapple, coconut). I get most of the barley on the front of the palate, with the grain whiskey components more on the finish. Something seems slightly missing for me to elevate this whiskey to classic status (some more pot still character, perhaps?), but it’s still a wonderful blended Irish whiskey. And it’s so drinkable. Gather a bunch of friends and throw away the cork!

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

The World Of Whiskey According to Wikipedia

Whiskey

"Whisky or whiskey is a type of alcoholic beverage distilled from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat, and maize (corn). Whisky is aged in wooden casks, made generally of white oak, except that in the United States corn whiskey need not be aged.

Whisky is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many competing denominations of origin and many classes and types. The unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation to less than 95% alcohol, and aging in wood.

Etymology:

Whisky is a shortened form of usquebaugh, which English borrowed from Gaelic (Irish uisce beatha and Scottish uisge beatha). This compound descends from Old Irish uisce, "water", and bethad, "of life" and meaning literally "water of life". It meant the same thing as the Latin aqua vītae which had been applied to distilled drinks since early 14th century. Other early spellings include usquebea (1706) and iskie bae (1583). In the Irish Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1405, the first written record of whiskey appears describing the death of a chieftain at Christmas from "taking a surfeit of aqua vitae". In Scotland, the first evidence of whisky production comes from an entry in the Exchequer Rolls for 1494 where malt is sent "To Friar John Cor, by order of the king, to make aquavitae".

History:

The art of distillation began with the Babylonians in Mesopotamia (in what is now Iraq) from at least the 2nd millennium BC, with perfumes and aromatics being distilled long before potable spirits. It is possible that the art of distillation was brought from the Mediterranean regions to Ireland by Irish missionaries between the 6th century and 7th century. Distillation was brought from Africa to Europe by the Moors, and its use spread through the monasteries,  largely for medicinal purposes, such as the treatment of colic, palsy, and smallpox.

Between 1100 and 1300, distillation spread to Ireland and Scotland, with monastic distilleries existing in Ireland in the 12th century. Since Britain had few grapes with which to make wine, barley beer was used instead, resulting in the development of whisky.  In 1494, as noted above, Scotland’s Exchequer granted the malt to Friar John Cor; this was enough malt to make about 1500 bottles, so the business was apparently thriving by that time.

King James IV of Scotland (r. 1488-1513) reportedly had a great liking for Scotch whisky, and in 1506 the town of Dundee purchased a large amount of Scotch from the Guild of Surgeon Barbers, which held the monopoly on production at the time. Between 1536 and 1541, King Henry VIII of England dissolved the monasteries, sending their monks out into the general public. Whisky production moved out of a monastic setting and into personal homes and farms as newly-independent monks needed to find a way to earn money for themselves.

The distillation process at the time was still in its infancy; whisky itself was imbibed at a very young age, and as a result tasted very raw and brutal compared to today’s versions. Renaissance-era whisky was also very potent and not diluted, and could even be dangerous at times. Over time, and with the happy accident of someone daring to drink from a cask which had been forgotten for several years, whisky evolved into a much smoother drink. In 1707, the Acts of Union merged England and Scotland, and thereafter taxes on it rose dramatically.[8]

After the English Malt Tax of 1725, most of Scotland’s distillation was either shut down or forced underground. Scotch whisky was hidden under altars, in coffins, and in any available space to avoid the governmental Excisemen.  Scottish distillers, operating out of homemade stills, took to distilling their whisky at night, where the darkness would hide the smoke rising from the stills. For this reason, the drink was known as moonshine.  At one point, it was estimated that over half of Scotland’s whisky output was illegal.

In America, whisky was used as currency during the American Revolution. It also was a highly coveted sundry and when an additional excise tax was levied against it, the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion took place.[7]

In 1823, the UK passed the Excise Act, legalising the distillation (for a fee), and this put a practical end to the large-scale production of Scottish moonshine.[

In 1831, Aeneas Coffey invented the Coffey still, allowing for cheaper and more efficient distillation of whisky. In 1850, Andrew Usher mixed traditional whisky with that from the new Coffey still, and in doing so created the first Scottish blended whisky. This new grain whisky was scoffed at by Irish distillers, who clung to their malt whisky. Many Irish contended that the new mixture was, in fact, not whisky at all.[3]

By the 1880s, the French brandy industry was devastated by the phylloxera pest that ruined much of the grape crop; as a result, whisky became the primary liquor in many markets. Types:

Copper Pot stills at Auchentoshan Distillery in Scotland

Whisky or whisky-like products are produced in most grain-growing areas. They differ in base product, alcoholic content, and quality.

Malted barley is an ingredient of some whiskies.

  • Malt is whisky made entirely from malted barley and distilled in an onion-shaped pot still.
  • Grain is made from malted and unmalted barley along with other grains, usually in a continuous "patent" or "Coffey" still. Until recently it was only used in blends, but there are now some single grain scotches being marketed.

Malts and grains are combined in various ways

  • Vatted malt is blended from malt whiskies from different distilleries. If a whisky is labelled "pure malt" or just "malt" it is almost certain to be a vatted whisky. This is also sometimes labelled as "blended malt" whisky.
  • Single malt whisky is malt whisky from a single distillery. However, unless the whisky is described as "single-cask" it will contain whisky from many casks, and different years, so the blender can achieve a taste recognisable as typical of the distillery. In most cases, the name of a single malt will be that of the distillery (The Glenlivet, Bushmills, Yoichi), with an age statement and perhaps some indication of some special treatments such as maturation in a port wine cask.
  • Pure pot still whiskey refers to a whiskey distilled in a pot-still (like single malt) from a mash of mixed malted and unmalted barley. It is exclusive to Ireland.
  • Malted barley is an ingredient of some whiskies.

    Blended whiskies are made from a mixture of malt and grain whiskies. A whisky simply described as Scotch Whisky or Irish Whiskey is most likely to be a blend in this sense. A blend is usually from many distilleries so that the blender can produce a flavour consistent with the brand, and the brand name (e.g., Chivas Regal, Canadian Club) will usually not therefore contain the name of a distillery. Jameson Irish Whiskey is an exception and comes from only one distillery. However, "blend" can (less frequently) have other meanings. A mixture of malts (with no grain) from different distilleries (more usually called a vatted malt) may sometimes be referred to as a "blended malt", and a mixture of grain whiskies with no malts will sometimes carry the designation "blended grain".

  • Cask strength whiskies are rare and usually only the very best whiskies are bottled in this way. They are usually bottled from the cask undiluted. Rather than diluting, the distiller is inviting the drinker to dilute to the level of potency most palatable (often no dilution is necessary, such is the quality of single cask whiskies). Single cask whiskies are usually bottled by specialist independent bottlers, such as Duncan Taylor, Master of Malt, Gordon & MacPhail and Cadenhead amongst others.

Whiskies do not mature in the bottle, only in the cask, so the "age" of a whisky is the time between distillation and bottling. This reflects how much the cask has interacted with the whisky, changing its chemical makeup and taste. Whiskies which have been in bottle for many years may have a rarity value, but are not "older" and will not necessarily be "better" than a more recently made whisky matured in wood for a similar time. Most whiskies are sold at or near an alcoholic strength of 40% abv.

American whiskeys:

American whiskey is distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain. It must have the taste, aroma, and other characteristics commonly attributed to whiskey.

The types listed in the federal regulations are:

  • Bourbon whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% corn (maize).
  • Rye whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% rye.
  • Wheat whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% wheat.
  • Malt whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted barley.
  • Rye malt whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted rye.
  • Corn whiskey, which is made from mash that consists of at least 80% corn (maize).

These "named types" of American whiskey must be distilled to not more than 80 percent alcohol by volume. They must then be aged in charred new oak containers, except for corn whiskey. Corn whiskey does not have to be aged but, if it is aged, it must be in new un-charred oak barrels or used barrels. The ageing for corn whiskey usually is brief, e.g., six months.

If the aging for a "named type" reaches 2 years or beyond, the whiskey is then additionally designated "straight" e.g., "straight rye whiskey". "Straight whiskey" (without naming a grain) is a whiskey which has been aged in charred new oak containers for 2 years or more and distilled at not more than 80 percent alcohol by volume but is derived from less than 51% of any one grain.

American blended whiskeys combine straight whiskey with grain neutral spirits (GNS), flavourings and colourings. The percentage of GNS must be disclosed on the label and may be as much at 80% on a proof gallon basis. Blended whiskey has the same alcohol content as straight whiskey but a much milder flavour.

Important in the marketplace is Tennessee whiskey, of which Jack Daniel's is the leading example. During production it is identical to bourbon whiskey in almost every important respect including the sour mash process. The only differences is that Tennessee whiskey is filtered through sugar maple charcoal, which is claimed to remove some unpleasant flavours and odours and produce a cleaner spirit. Though not defined by Federal regulations, the Government of the United States officially recognized Tennessee whiskey as a separate style distinct from bourbon in 1941.

Templeton Rye Whisky(Templeton, Iowa)

The United States was recovering from World War I, and many farmers needed additional income to support their families and farm payments. In response to this need for revenue, a group of farmers in a small town of Templeton, Iowa began to brew and distil their own form of rye whiskey, which they named Templeton Rye. Word of the single barrel malt Templeton Rye quickly spread and eventually caught the attention of the Capone gang, who began bootlegging hundreds of kegs of Templeton Rye per month and distributing it to speakeasies throughout New York, Chicago and as far west as Denver. Legend has it that Capone even orchestrated getting Templeton Rye smuggled to him while incarcerated in Alcatraz.

Australian whiskeys:

Australia produces a number of single malt whiskies. The whiskies being produced on the island State of Tasmania in particular are receiving global attention.

Australian whiskies are winning an increasing number of global whisky awards and medals, including for example the World Whiskies Awards and Jim Murray's Whisky Bible 'Liquid Gold Awards'.

Australian distilleries include: Bakery Hill, Hellyers Road, Lark, Limeburners, Nant, Small Concern (no longer operating), Smith's (no longer operating) and Sullivan's Cove.

Canadian whiskeys:

 

Canadian whiskies are usually lighter and smoother than other whisky styles. Another common characteristic of many Canadian whiskies is their use of rye that has been malted, which provides a fuller flavour and smoothness. By Canadian law,[11] Canadian whiskies must be produced in Canada, be distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain, "be aged in small wood for not less than 3 years", and "possess the aroma, taste and character generally attributed to Canadian whisky". The terms "Canadian Whisky", "Canadian Rye Whisky" and "Rye Whisky" are legally indistinguishable in Canada and do not denote any particular proportion of rye or other grain used in production.

Finnish whiskeys:

There are two working distilleries in Finland and a third one is under construction. Whisky retail sales in Finland are controlled solely by the state alcohol monopoly Alko and advertisement of strong alcoholic beverages is banned.

German whiskeys:

The distillation of German-made whisky is a relatively recent phenomenon having only started in the last 30 years. The styles produced resemble those made in Ireland, Scotland and the United States: single malts, blends, and bourbon styles. There is no standard spelling of German whiskies with distilleries using both "whisky" and "whiskey" and one even using "whessky", a play on the word whisky and Hessen, the state in which it is produced. There are currently ten distilleries in Germany producing whisky.

Indian whiskeys:

Indian whisky is an alcoholic beverage that is labelled as "whisky" in India. Much Indian whisky is distilled from fermented molasses, and as such would be considered a sort of rum outside of the Indian subcontinent. 90% of the "whisky" consumed in India is molasses based, although India has begun to distill whisky from malt and other grains.[15]

Kasauli Distillery is set in the Himalaya mountains and opened in the late 1820s. The main whisky brand is a single malt named "Solan No. 1". This was named after the town nearby called Solan. It was the best selling Indian whisky till recently, but has declined since the early 1980s because of the stiff competition from the larger distilleries. Other whiskies this distillery produces are Diplomat Deluxe, Colonel's Special, Black Knight and Summer Hall.

Irish whiskeys:

Most Irish whiskeys are distilled three times. Though traditionally distilled using pot stills, column still are now used to produce grain whiskey for blends. By law, Irish whiskey must be produced in Ireland and aged in wooden casks for a period of no less than three years, although in practice it is usually three or four times that period.[18] Unpeated malt is almost always used, the main exception being Connemara Peated Malt whiskey.

There are several types of whiskey common to Ireland: single malt, single grain, blended whiskey and uniquely to Ireland, pure pot still whiskey. The designation "pure pot still" as used in Ireland generally refers to whiskey made of 100% barley, mixed malted and unmalted, and distilled in a pot still made of copper. The "green" unmalted barley gives the traditional pure pot still whiskey a spicy, uniquely Irish quality. Like single malt, pure pot still is sold as such or blended with grain whiskey. Usually no real distinction is made between whether a blended whiskey was made from single malt or pure pot still.

Japanese Whiskeys:

The model for Japanese whiskeys is the single malt Scotch, although there are also examples of Japanese blended whiskies. The base is a mash of malted barley, dried in kilns fired with a little peat (although considerably less than in Scotland), and distilled using the pot still method. For some time exports of Japanese whisky suffered from the belief in the West that whisky made in the Scotch style, but not produced in Scotland, was inferior, and until fairly recently, the market for Japanese whiskies was almost entirely domestic. In recent years, Japanese whiskies have won prestigious international awards and now enjoy a reputation as a quality product.

Scotch whiskeys:

Scotch whiskeys are generally distilled twice, though some are distilled a third time. International laws require anything bearing the label "Scotch" to be distilled in Scotland and matured for a minimum of three years and one day in oak casks, among other, more specific criteria. If Scotch whisky is from more than one cask, and if it includes an age statement on the bottle, it must reflect the age of the youngest whisky in the blend. Many cask-strength single malts omit the age as they use younger elements in minute amounts for flavouring and mellowing. The basic types of Scotch are malt and grain, which are combined to create blends. Many, though not all, Scotch whiskies use peat smoke to treat their malt, giving Scotch its distinctive smoky flavour. While the market is dominated by blends, the most highly prized of Scotch whiskies are the single malts. Scotch whiskies are divided into five main regions: Highland, Lowland, Islay, Speyside and Campbeltown.

Welsh Whiskeys:

In 2000, Penderyn Distillery started production of the Penderyn single malt Welsh whisky in Wales, the first Welsh whisky since all production ended in 1894. The first bottles went on sale on 1 March 2004, Saint David's Day, and the whisky is now sold throughout the world. Penderyn Distillery is situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park and is considered the smallest distillery in the world.

Other Whiskeys:

In Brittany, France, five distilleries (Distillerie des Menhirs,[24] Guillon,[25] Glann ar Mor,[26] Kaerilis[27] and Warenghem[28]) produce whisky using techniques similar to those in Scotland.

One whisky is produced on the French island of Corsica: Pietra & Mavella (P&M) is a coproduction of the brewery Pietra and the distillery Mavella. The mash is enriched with chestnut flour. P&M is matured in muscat casks (Domaine Gentile).[29][not in citation given]

Manx Spirit from the Isle of Man is, like some Virginia whiskeys in the USA, distilled elsewhere and re-distilled in the country of its nominal "origin".

In Spain there is a distillery named DYC, started in 1948.

In Sweden a new distillery (Mackmyra), started selling its products in 2006.

Recently at least two distilleries in the traditionally brandy-producing Caucasus region announced their plans to enter the Russian domestic market with whiskies. The Stavropol-based Praskoveysky distillery bases its product on Irish technology, while in Kizlyar, Dagestan's "Russian Whisky" announced a Scotch-inspired drink in single malt, blended and wheat varieties.

In Taiwan, the King Car company built a whisky distillery in the city of Yilan, and has recently begun marketing Kavalan Single Malt Whisky.

Production of whisky started in Norfolk, England in late 2006 and the first whisky (as opposed to malt spirit) was made available to the public in November 2009. This is the first English single malt in over 100 years. It was produced at St George's Distillery by the English Whisky Company.  Previously Bristol and Liverpool were centres of English whisky production. East Anglia is a source of much of the grain used in Scotch whisky.

Names and spellings:

The word "whisky" is believed to have been coined by soldiers of King Henry II who invaded Ireland in the 12th century as they struggled to pronounce the native Irish words uisce beatha [ɪʃkʲə bʲahə], meaning "water of life". Over time, the pronunciation changed from "whishkeyba" (an approximation of how the Irish term sounds) to "whisky". The name itself is a Gaelic calque of the Latin phrase aqua vitae, meaning "water of life".

Much is made of the word's two spellings, whisky and whiskey. Today, the spelling whisky (plural whiskies) is generally used for whiskies distilled in Scotland, Wales, Canada, and Japan, while whiskey (plural whiskeys) is used for the whiskeys distilled in Ireland and the United States. However, several prominent American brands, such as Maker's Mark and George Dickel, use the 'whisky' spelling. When writing generally about this type of spirit, either spelling is correct.

"Scotch" is the internationally recognized term for "Scotch whisky" however it is rarely used in Scotland, where the drink is called 'whisky.'

In many Latin-American countries, whisky (wee-skee) is used as a photographer's cue to smile, supplanting English "cheese". The Uruguayan film Whisky got its name because of this.

Chemistry:

Whiskeys and other distilled beverages such as cognac and rum are complex beverages containing a vast range of flavouring compounds, of which some 200 to 300 can be easily detected by chemical analysis. The flavoring chemicals include "carbonyl compounds, alcohols, carboxylic acids and their esters, nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds, terpenes, and oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds" and esters of fatty acids.  The nitrogen compounds include pyridines, picolines and pyrazines.

Flavours from distillation:

The flavoring of whisky is partially determined by the presence of congeners and fusel oils. Fusel oils are higher alcohols than ethanol, are mildly toxic, and have a strong, disagreeable smell and taste. An excess of fusel oils in whisky is considered a defect. A variety of methods are employed in the distillation process to remove unwanted fusel oils. Traditionally, American distillers focused on secondary filtration using charcoal, gravel, sand, or linen to remove undesired distillates. Canadian distillers have traditionally employed column stills which can be controlled to produce an almost pure (and less flavorful) ethanol known as neutral grain spirit or grain neutral spirit (GNS).  Flavor is restored by blending the neutral grain spirits with flavoring whiskies.

Acetals are rapidly formed in distillates and a great many are found in distilled beverages, the most prominent being acetaldehyde diethyl acetal (1,1-diethoxyethane). Among whiskies the highest levels are associated with malt whisky. This acetal is a principal flavour compound in sherry, and contributes fruitiness to the aroma.

The diketone diacetyl (2,3-Butanedione) has a buttery aroma and is present in almost all distilled beverages. Whiskies and cognacs typically contain more than vodkas, but significantly less than rums or brandies.[42]

Flavours from oak:

Whisky lactone (3-methyl-4-octanolide) is found in all types of oak. This lactone has a strong coconut aroma.  Whisky lactone is also known as quercus lactone.  Commercially charred oaks are rich in phenolic compounds. One study identified 40 different phenolic compounds. The coumarin scopoletin is present in whisky, with the highest level reported in Bourbon whiskey.

Bourbon

Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria."

Whiskey according to Wikipedia

Disclaimer:

This article is posted here from Wikipedia so readers of our blog can see a brief overview of whiskey without having to leave our blog.   All credit from this post goes to Wikipedia.  We just like to collect facts and tasting notes from all over the web to share with our Whiskey Society and our guests that love whiskey.  Happy reading and drinking!

You can try the Whiskeys mentioned here at  de Vere’s Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey’s at a discount!

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Makers Mark Review

Maker’s Mark

Maker’s Mark is produced at Loretto in Kentucky, where distilling has been taking place on the Star Hill Farm site since to 1805. The present brand was developed by Bill Samuels Snr, who bought Star Hill in 1953, and the Scottish spelling of ‘whisky’ has been employed since the outset in recognition of Samuels’ Scottish ancestry. Since 2005 maker’s Mark has been owned by Fortune Brands, who are also responsible for Jim Beam. Samuels chose to create a Bourbon using a proportion of red winter wheat instead of the more common rye, in order to reduce the ‘burn’ left by many Bourbons of the time. The result is a comparatively soft and gentle spirit, which becomes very mellow as it matures. A subtle, complex, clean nose, with vanilla and spice, a delicate floral note of roses, plus lime and cocoa beans. Medium in body, Maker’s Mark offers a palate of fresh fruit, spices, eucalyptus and ginger cake. The finish features more spices, fresh oak with a hint of smoke, and a final flash of peach cheesecake. A delicate and circumspect Bourbon compared to some of its more redneck cousins. Very drinkable. 45.0% ABV

Maker’s Mark 46

Maker’s 46 has an unmistakable spice on the nose, yet not strong. This next generation bourbon is smooth and forward tasting on the palate yet retains a pleasant bite. On the backend, like the original Maker’s Mark, there is none of harness sometimes associated with Rye, but nice honey finish. Other notes present include vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, nutmeg and other sweet spices. Being a bourbon man myself, I liked it! Marker’s 46 is a fine sipping bourbon and has the potential to become a potent ingredient in the bar arsenal. I will report back once I whip up an Old Fashioned or Manhattan with the 46.

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try these Whiskeys at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

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A toast of whiskey

A toast of whiskey

Author: Chris Macias
Published: March 16th, 2011 02:09 PM

"A pint of Guinness sounds good for St. Patrick's Day, but this year we're ready to give a little Irish whiskey a spin. In the world of spirits, Irish whiskey's known for being exceptionally smooth compared to its counterparts around the world.

In Ireland, the majority of whiskeys are distilled three times during production, making for a clean and delicately sweet drink that goes down easy before yelling "Erin go bragh."

Whiskey's been produced in Ireland for centuries, and the country was home at one point to more than 1,000 distilleries. That number has been reduced to just a handful in Ireland today, but they still produce a range of whiskey styles from such brands as Bushmills, Jameson and Redbreast.

To get a head start on St. Patrick's Day, we're here at de Vere's Irish Pub, where the TVs broadcast a Champions League soccer match with Barcelona vs. Arsenal.

De Vere's carries 32 different Irish whiskeys, from smoky peat whiskeys to a bottle of Tyrconnell that's been aged in sherry casks. De Vere's even hosts its own whiskey society to introduce enthusiasts to the diversity found in this spirit.

"We get a lot of people who started as wine drinkers and then found something new they liked learning about," said co-owner Simon de Vere White.

"In an Irish whiskey, you'll be looking for something that's well-balanced with a little heat and some spice. It'll have less of the caramel and vanilla flavors that you'll find in American whiskey and bourbon."

So where to start with Irish whiskey? Well, make your first decision one that could save your life. If drinking away from home, designate a driver or keep a taxi service's number on hand.

St. Patrick's Day ranks as one of the most dangerous days on the road due to alcohol consumption. According to the CHP, a total of five people were killed and 142 people injured in 240 alcohol-involved collisions statewide on St. Patrick's Day in 2009 and 2010.

After you've checked this off your list, Liquid Assets recommends you check out these three Irish whiskeys on St. Patrick's Day and beyond:

Slane Castle Irish Whiskey (roughly $30 for 750 ml bottle, $7-$10 per shot at bars): De Vere White likes to start newcomers with this smooth and cask-y spirit that's been aged in American bourbon barrels. This whiskey definitely carries a little kick and a spicy finish, but paired with a smooth and balanced mouthfeel, just like a proper Irish whiskey should.

Connemara Peated Single Malt Irish Whiskey (about $40 for a 750 ml bottle in stores, $7-$10 per shot at bars): Here's a tasty example of a peated whiskey, which uses grains that have been roasted over a peat fire. The result is a smoky and earthy drink that's something like the whiskey equivalent of a fine cigar. Look for an exceptionally long finish with a bit of sweetness and spice mixed in with that smoky character.

Redbreast 12-year-old Pure Pot Still Irish Whiskey (roughly $40 per 750 ml bottle in stores, $9 to $11 per shot at bars): Take a sip of this full-bodied yet impeccably balanced whiskey and you'll see why it was named "Whiskey of the Year" by "Whisky Bible" author Jim Murray.

Full of complexity, with flavors of sweet caramel, spice and a touch of sherry, this whiskey is one to sip and savor."

Click here to find out more!

Original Article

A toast to two of Sac's best pubs

It has been just two years since this pub opened in the heart of midtown and already I cannot imagine the Sacramento dining and night life scene without it. Community spirit, wisdom, integrity, charm – de Vere's has all of that, along with excellent attention to detail when it comes to serving its beer

de Vere's Is Going Big For St. Patrick's Day!

ST. PATRICK'S DAY 2011

Join us on St. Patrick’s Day for the ultimate authentic-Irish experience. At de Vere’s Irish Pub, you can enjoy the beautiful woodwork, family heirlooms, friendly banter, and of course, the perfect pint of Guinness (a specialty we’ve mastered).

Our pub doors will open at 8am—and our famous Irish coffees will be piping hot and ready to serve.

At 11am, we will close down the sidewalks and open our outside venue, which will include an outdoor kitchen serving traditional Irish fare (like corned beef and cabbage) and a stage featuring live entertainment throughout the day.

Bring your friends and family to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in true Irish fashion.

BECOME A FAN

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ST. PATRICK'S DAY 20111

This year de Vere’s Irish Pub and the Downtown Sacramento Partnership have teamed up for the ultimate St. Patrick’s Day Festival. The party in the park will be bigger and better than ever. We’re moving to Cesar Chavez Plaza located in the heart of Downtown Sacramento at 10th & J streets to accommodate our fans.

BENEFITING LOCAL CHARITIES

MaryHouse

Maryhouse is a daytime hospitality shelter for homeless women and children. This past year, 1,584 women and 978 children received services at Maryhouse.

> Donate to MaryHouse

Sacramento Firefighters Pipes and Drums

> Donate to the Sacramento Pipes and Drums

DE VERE'S ST. PATRICK'S DAY HISTORY

The deVere’s St. Patrick’s Day festival is the largest event of its kind in Sacramento . The 2010 event attracted nearly 7,000 attendees to the all day event featuring live music and entertainment.

THE DOWNTOWN PARTNERSHIP

The Downtown Sacramento Partnership (DSP) is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to the improvement of Sacramento's central business district. The DSP oversees maintenance, safety and revitalization programs financed by the Downtown Sacramento Management District, a property assessment district established in 1995 and renewed in 2000.

BECOME A FAN

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

de Vere's St. Patrick's day Pub Party

>

Join us on St. Patrick’s Day for the ultimate authentic-Irish experience. At de Vere’s Irish Pub, you can enjoy the beautiful woodwork, family heirlooms, friendly banter, and of course, the perfect pint of Guinness (a specialty we’ve mastered).

Our pub doors will open at 8am—and our famous Irish coffees will be piping hot and ready to serve.

At 11am, we will close down the sidewalks and open our outside venue, which will include an outdoor kitchen serving traditional Irish fare (like corned beef and cabbage) and a stage featuring live entertainment throughout the day.

Bring your friends and family to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in true Irish fashion.

Party Timeline

8:00 AM: Pub opens

11:00 AM: Our extended sidewalk party area opens

12:00 PM: Authentic corned beef and cabbage lunch

2:00 PM: Cover-charge for the party begins

2:30 PM: Pipes and Drums

3:30 PM: Kennely School Dancers

4:30 PM: Nine-8ths Irish

7:00 PM: Kennel School Dancers

8:30 PM: Whiskey and Stitches

For all updates follow us on twitter @sacstpats

www.sacstpats.com

de Vere's St. Patrick's day Party in the Park

March 17, 2011 • 10 am – 10 p

This year de Vere’s Irish Pub and the Downtown Sacramento Partnership have teamed up for the ultimate St. Patrick’s Day Festival. The party in the park will be bigger and better than ever. We’re moving to Cesar Chavez Plaza located in the heart of Downtown Sacramento at 10th & J streets to accommodate our fans.

10:00 AM: Doors Open

11:00 AM: Live dancers on stage

11:30 AM: Nine-8th's Irish

12:00 PM: Lunch served!

1:30 PM: Dancers on stage

2:30 PM: Whiskey and Stitches

4:30 PM: Black Eyed Dempseys

6:30 PM: Pipes and Drums

7:30 PM: Zoo Station

10:00 PM: Park closed. Head to de Vere's Pub!

Dine Downtown: Preview of de Vere’s Irish Pub Menu

De Vere’s not only offers the largest whiskey collection in Sacramento, it offers a full restaurant menu including weekday happy hours, daily lunch and dinner and even a weekend brunch menu.

Dine Downtown: Preview of de Vere’s Irish Pub Menu

By Tracy Arnold

"Prior to this last Wednesday, the only reason I had ever visited de Vere’s Irish Pub was for the occasional pint of Guinness. If you are like me, I challenge you to change your perspective and discover the food behind the drink. De Vere’s not only offers the largest whiskey collection in Sacramento, it offers a full restaurant menu including weekday happy hours, daily lunch and dinner and even a weekend brunch menu (that I notice includes a bacon waffle – with chopped bacon in the waffle batter – intriguing!).

For those of you who have never visited de Vere’s, it is a traditional Irish pub – loud atmosphere, table tucked in nooks, two large bars and an outside patio. It is a great place for happy hour after a long day or participate in a weekly trivia night contest. However, I discovered they should also be on one’s list of dinner destinations.

de Vere’s Dine Downtown menu offers a three course dinner comprised of either beet salad or soup of the day (we had Irish Wedding soup, YUM!), followed by a second course of either braised lamb shoulder stew or lemon Dijon chicken, and the dessert course choices include Bailey’s cheesecake or crispy bread pudding served with vanilla ice cream and fresh berries.

The beet salad, is a mache lettuce salad with both golden and red beets and herbed goat cheese. The Irish wedding soup was my favorite choice in this course, best description is a home-made chicken sausage and noodle soup with kale and beans – exactly what this January weather calls for. The lamb dish was served like a stew with barley, fresh carrots and a mint salsa that made the entire dish pop. The chicken is a de Vere’s favorite, roasted chicken and red seasoned potatoes served with cabbage – after all what is an Irish meal without cabbage?

For dessert, the crispy bread pudding alone is worth trying out de Vere’s Dine Downtown menu. It is one of those dishes that will soon be featured on the Food Network’s Best Thing I Ever Ate - it is a cross between French toast and a churro, deep fried goodness rolled in sugar and cinnamon served with ice cream, fresh raspberries and blueberries topped with caramel – it cannot get any better!

While there, I also learned that de Vere’s just added to their regular menu a fully loaded (with peas and bacon) mac and cheese that has the potential to surpass Esquire Grill’s as the best mac and cheese in town. It offers whiskey pairing dinners to members of the de Vere’s Whiskey Society, and in addition to hosting the city’s biggest St. Patrick’s day celebration, de Vere’s hosts Sacramento’s annual St. Baldrick’s shaving day to raise money for childhood cancer research."
Original Article

de Vere's Pub's Dine Downtown Menu 2011

de Vere's Irish Pub's menu for Sacramento's 2011 Dine Downtown experience.

New Years Menu

Join us for an incredible dinner experience with your friends and loved one's this New Years Eve.  Our Chef's have gone out of their way to put together an outstanding menu featuring local farm to table products.  Come and enjoy a few pints for a toast to Dublin at 4 pm, then stay and spend the rest of your evening with us and bring in the New Year in true Irish fashion with one of our 170 whiskeys.

de Vere's New Year's Toast To Dublin!

 

de Vere’s is going all out this year to bring in the New Years in true Irish Fashion.  Bring your family and friends with you to the pub and celebrate the New Years with a great pint, a whiskey toast, and with champagne for everyone. We will be celebrating the New Years twice this year!  We are having a toast to Dublin at 4pm our time or midnight Irish time with champagne and whiskey for everyone!  Bring in the Irish New Year with your favorite Irish pub! We will also then be celebrating our New Year’s at midnight with a champagne and whiskey toast for everyone in the pub!

If you want to make a night of it, call us after December first and book a table for you and your friends for an evening at de Vere’s Irish Pub.  We will be serving a limited sit down dinner from 7:30 pm until 9:30 pm for people with reservations only.  Not only will you have a fabulous multi-course dinner created by our chefs, but you will also then be able to hold onto your table for the entire evening of festivities! (Not all tables are available for the entire night, limited availability please ask about these tables when placing your reservation. $65 per for dinner and to hold the table, if you want just dinner than it's only $50 per person) Our Chefs have been wooing people with their whiskey and beer dinners since we have opened and they are looking forward to making sure everyone has a fantastic and memorable New Years dinner!

We can’t wait to bring in the New Year with all of you!

Slainte!

de Vere's Irish Pub

*** If you want more information about our events, whiskey dinners, St. Patrick’s day or to enter to win a trip for two to Ireland, please go to our website and join our Pub Club Newsletter.  www.deverespub.com