Best Pub

Burger Thursday's: Sacramento's Best Burgers

FEATURED BLOG:  Round About Sac Town

"First and foremost de Vere’s Irish Pub is one of the best places to go and eat, drink, watch a game, or just hangout. It is centrally located and a great atmosphere. On top of that the people there are great and the de Vere family are truly an asset to our community. Check out the area on St. Patrick’s Day and tell me they don’t know how to go big! I have been many times to de Vere’s and love the feel and the food every time, but my full review will come soon in another post with lots of pictures.

I did find out about their upcoming Burger Thursday specials. A few months ago de Vere’s and Burger Junkies (@burgerjunkies) put on Sacramento Burger Month and de Vere’s had a new unique burger each week of the month and it went over well. They do an excellent job with each burger creation they come up with and bringing back the concept sounded like a great idea. So what I was told is that each Thursday for two weeks at a time there will be a special featured burger that can only be eaten on the Burger Thursdays., and you all are in a treat for the October specials! They created a new burger and brought back one of the phenomenal burgers from Sacramento burger month.  I had the privilege of previewing the upcoming burgers and will tell you all about them!

First two Thursdays of October (Oct. 7 & 14)- The Buffalo Crunch Burger

Buffalo Crunch Burger

The Buffalo Crunch burger actually didn’t have a name when I got to sink my teeth into this monster burger but one of my dining companions Donelle (@dobrien917) thought of the great name. Now this is a monster of a burger so make sure to ask for extra napkins when  you order it (and you should order it!). It comes on the de Vere’s signature pretzel bun that makes all their burgers taste great. I like this pretzel bun because it is not as dense as other pretzel buns I have had but it holds its form and doesn’t just fall apart as you eat your burger like other places.

Buffalo Crunch Burger uncapped

This burger comes with bleu cheese, a bleu cheese “dressing”/sauce, the meat is covered/smothered in a house made buffalo style sauce with house made potato crisps (really crunchy potato chips) and lettuce and tomato.  Just look at that sauce dripping down from that really good-sized burger intertwined with the melty cheese (I’m hungry now!). This was a sample of the burger so I didn’t get to ask for my burger cooked the way I like, but I would have liked my burger just a bit more pink on the inside (they usually ask when you order so this was a fluke here). Check out the chef describing the burger himself:

I told you they didn’t have a name for the burger yet but we helped them out. As I said before this burger is quite large and will require a little work before you start digging into this bad boy. First take out the toothpick, then put your hand firmly on top of that pretzel bun and then use some force and press down on that burger. You should be hearing some loud crunching and if you’re not use more force (come on Luke use the force)! Your burger might look similar to this:

Buffalo Crunch squished

I will admit I thought they were a little crazy when I saw the burger and all the buffalo sauce. I though what did I get myself into? Buffalo chicken, why of course but on a burger I wasn’t so sure and I thought the spiciness of the sauce might turn off a lot of people. I’m telling you the sauce has a great tanginess with very slight heat. If you are afraid of spicy items don’t be afraid of this burger, plus the cheese counters the spiciness some as well. When I first bit into the burger my taste buds immediately when to the creamy bleu cheese flavor. I was surprised I though it would be dominated by buffalo sauce. As I am working my head around the cheese the meat and buffalo sauce flavor come into my mouth. I was truly surprised how these flavors melded so well into this burger. Now the best part of the burger (in my opinion) are the potato crisps. I remember as a kid putting potato chips on my sandwiches and this is fun too. The crisps are not your bagged store-bought chips. These are extra-crispy house made crisps. These are so crunchy that our friend sitting at the next table over could hear the crunch as we bit down into the burgers.

This burger is so tasty and so much fun. I wish today was Thursday so I could go back and get myself another one. Remember this is only available for the next two Thursdays at de Vere’s for their Burger Thursday specials!

 

Second two Thursdays of October (Oct 20 & 27)- Prime Rib Burger (AKA The Bad MoFo)

Prime Rib Burger (traditional bun)

The pic of the burger was the first iteration of the burger with a traditional bun. I happened to be there the first day of the release of the burger with my friend Autumn (@bmprstkr76) and we were attempting to eat the burger and that bun just could not hold up to the meat and sauce. Right then and there Henry (@henrydevere) decided to make the change to the pretzel bun and it was in excellent change.

Prime Rib Burger with pretzel bun

When most people think or hear about a prime rib burger most think a burger made from the prime rib cut of meat. That sounds delicious and all but not at de Vere’s. For this burger you get a nice juicy burger with carmelized onions and melted manchango cheese with horseradish mayo, then to put it over the top and make it a prime rib burger they top that burger with slices of prime rib and serve it with Au Jus. This is not just  a couple of slices of prime rib but the equivalent of another burger on top of the good-sized burger. I think they have mad geniuses in the kitchen thinking of these flavor profiles.

The taste is great, I mean burger, cheese, carmelized onions, prime rib, mayo, pretzel bun do you see anything wrong with that list. My small complaints that can be easily fixed, with the size of the burger and prime rib, the horseradish mayo was a little weak. I was told they added more horseradish in later batches but mine was weak and hard to find on my burger. My suggestion is to request an extra side of the mayo with your burger (I always ask for more horseradish when I order prime rib too) that way you can add more to  your burger. The Au Jus was a little watered down for me, I’m not sure if there wasn’t a lot of spices on the outside of the prime rib when they roasted it or they didn’t add any salt to the sauce but it needed more depth. I just added a little salt to my Au Jus and it was better.

The burger itself with the prime rib was excellent. I bit down and got a little smoky goodness from the carmelized onions then the rich prime rib and then juicy burger. Really really great, plus dipping this big burger into the Au Jus really made it juicy and flavorful. I first tried the traditional bun and it fell apart each time I dipped the burger but with the pretzel bun I had no problems and you shouldn’t either as they will be serving this burger with the pretzel bun.

Remember you can only get this the last two Thursdays of October for the Burger Thursday specials.

Go check out de Vere’s Irish Pub Burger Thursdays and let me know what you think."

de Vere’s Irish Pub 1521 L Street Sacramento, CA 95816

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Hi there! My name is Jeremy and I am a dad, corporate/leadership trainer, and social media enthusiast that lives in Sacramento, CA. I enjoy partaking in the various great places and eats of Sacramento. I hope to create a space that will be useful to you as I go through my adventures through Sacramento and my various travels.

I also am an Angry Birds enthusiast and video walk-through creator and you can view my Angry Birds videos at youtube.com/hathman23.

Make sure to follow me on twitter: @roundabtsactown and/or @hathman

Trivia Teaser Answers

Last Friday, we posted the pub quiz questions from that week. To help inspire you to join us tonight (and EVERY Monday night), we're now posting the answers. How many did you know? See you tonight! 1. Who wrote the book entitles "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?" MARK TWAIN

2. Bonus: Yesterday (Sunday 7/10), the U.S. women's soccer team won their match against the team from which nation in the Women's World Cup. For a bonus point, in which nation is this tournament being held? BRAZIL, GERMANY

3. What continent, on average, experiences the most tornadoes annually than any other? NORTH AMERICA

4. What famous actor won a Best Director Oscar for directing the 1982 film "Reds"? WARREN BEATTY

5. Made by the Annabelle candy company, what is the name of the white taffy candy bar with the peanut butter center that is packaged in a black and yellow checkerboard wrapper? YABBA ZABBA

6. What is the name of the NHL team that plays their home games in Carolina? HURRICANES

7. In "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," the Knights who say "Ni" demanded that King Arthur use a specific type of fish to cut down the mightiest tree in the forest. What type of fish? HERRING

8. The star Belegeuse gets its name from the Arabic for "the giant's shoulder" and can be found in which constellation? ORION

9. Who is the author of the story known as the "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?" ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

10. In the first Gulf War, the U.S. put patriot missiles to the test against what 4-letter, Iraqi ballistic missiles? SCUD

11. What is the capital city of Uruguay? MONTEVIDEO

12.  Xylem or phloem: which is concerned with upwards water transportation through a plant, moving water and nutrients from the roots to the leaves? XYLEM

13. After a 20-year hiatus, which hugely popular CBS TV series, that ran for 13 full seasons, is set to return to the airwaves this fall, this time on TNT and with 3 of its most popular original cast members? DALLAS

14. Bonus: The word LASER is an acronym. What do the S and the R stand for in the acronym LASER? STIMULATED, RADIATION

15. Anagram: What specific professional job title can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Doogie is practical dirt?" Clues: 2 words, medical field. PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGIST

16. Who was the scientist that is most often credited for being the first to propose the theory of a sun-centered universe? COPERNICUS

17. Bonus: On the classic TV sitcom, "The Munsters," who played Lily and who played Merman? YVONNE DE CARLO AND FRED GWYNN

18. Speaking of Lilies, the character Lily on which current TV show is going to be replaced by another actress for next season? MODERN FAMILY

19. Similar to how a UPC symbol works, these types of matrix bar codes found on signs and objects allow people with smartphones to take pictures of them to download information. What is the two-letter term for these types of barcodes? QR CODE

20. Anagram: The name of what city, followed by its state, can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Own creamy pig?" CASPER, WYOMING

21. Before adopting the Euro, what was the unit of currency of the Netherlands? GUILDER

22. Which U. S. president had the most children, 15 of them?! (Legitimate) JOHN TYLER

23. With regards to cholesterol, what do the letters in the acronym LDL stand for? LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN

24. What controversial science-fiction and self-help writer with the first name of Lafayette, dies in 1986? L. RON HUBBARD

25. What nation has as its only two land neighbors India and Myanmar? BANGLADESH

26. What make and model of car was the General Lee on the classic TV show "The Dukes of Hazard"? DODGE CHARGER

27. In which U.S. city will you find the Arthur Ashe Tennis Stadium? NEW YORK CITY (FLUSHING, QUEENS)

28. Which Canadian province or territory is bordered by Alberta to its east? BRITISH COLUMBIA

29. Ireland: Ardrahan, Corleggy, Durrus and Cooleeny are all what type of Irish foodstuff? CHEESE

30: Bonus: Who are the managers of the American League and National League teams in this year's All-Star Game? BRUCE BOCHY, RON WASHINGTON

Tiebreaker: In what year was the first Subway sandwich shop opened in Bridgeport, CT? 1965

Our First-Ever Trivia Teaser

Every Monday night is trivia night here at the pub. For the first time, we're posting questions from this week's pub quiz. How many do YOU know? Leave your answers in the comments...we'll post the full set on answers on Monday to get you ready for another round that night! Happy weekend, all! 1. Who wrote the book entitled "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?"

2. Bonus: Yesterday (Sunday 7/10), the U.S. women's soccer team won their match against the team from which nation in the Women's World Cup. For a bonus point, in which nation is this tournament being held?

3. What continent, on average, experiences the most tornadoes annually than any other?

4. What famous actor won a Best Director Oscar for directing the 1982 film "Reds"?

5. Made by the Annabelle candy company, what is the name of the white taffy candy bar with the peanut butter center that is packaged in a black and yellow checkerboard wrapper?

6. What is the name of the NHL team that plays their home games in Carolina?

7. In "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," the Knights who say "Ni" demanded that King Arthur use a specific type of fish to cut down the mightiest tree in the forest. What type of fish?

8. The star Belegeuse gets its name from the Arabic for "the giant's shoulder" and can be found in which constellation?

9. Who is the author of the story known as the "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?"

10. In the first Gulf War, the U.S. put patriot missiles to the test against what 4-letter, Iraqi ballistic missiles?

11. What is the capital city of Uruguay?

12. Xylem or phloem: which is concerned with upwards water transportation through a plant, moving water and nutrients from the roots to the leaves?

13. After a 20-year hiatus, which hugely popular CBS TV series, that ran for 13 full seasons, is set to return to the airwaves this fall, this time on TNT and with 3 of its most popular original cast members?

14. Bonus: The word LASER is an acronym. What do the S and the R stand for in the acronym LASER?

15. Anagram: What specific professional job title can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Doogie is practical dirt?" Clues: 2 words, medical field.

16. Who was the scientist that is most often credited for being the first to propose the theory of a sun-centered universe?

17. Bonus: On the classic TV sitcom, "The Munsters," who played Lily and who played Merman?

18. Speaking of Lilies, the character Lily on which current TV show is going to be replaced by another actress for next season?

19. Similar to how a UPC symbol works, these types of matrix bar codes found on signs and objects allow people with smartphones to take pictures of them to download information. What is the two-letter term for these types of barcodes?

20. Anagram: The name of what city, followed by its state, can be made by unscrambling the phrase "Own creamy pig?"

21. Before adopting the Euro, what was the unit of currency of the Netherlands?

22. Which U. S. president had the most children, 15 of them?! (Legitimate)

23. With regards to cholesterol, what do the letters in the acronym LDL stand for?

24. What controversial science-fiction and self-help writer with the first name of Lafayette, dies in 1986?

25. What nation has as its only two land neighbors India and Myanmar?

26. What make and model of car was the General Lee on the classic TV show "The Dukes of Hazard"?

27. In which U.S. city will you find the Arthur Ashe Tennis Stadium?

28. Which Canadian province or territory is bordered by Alberta to its east?

29. Ireland: Ardrahan, Corleggy, Durrus and Cooleeny are all what type of Irish foodstuff?

30: Bonus: Who are the managers of the American League and National League teams in this year's All-Star Game?

Tiebreaker: In what year was the first Subway sandwich shop opened in Bridgeport, CT?

 

Don't forget to show your smarts! Leave answers in the comments!

It's Here: July's Lighter Side of Ireland Menu

Last month, we kicked off our first-ever "Lighter Side of Ireland" food series with the refreshing Seaside Menu. This month, we're getting rustic with a Farmhouse Menu, which debuted this week. Flavorful cuts of meat...crisp vegetables...fresh-picked, juicy fruits. Are you hungry yet? Even more mouthwatering is the fact that our prolific chefs (it's unreal how many unique dishes they dream up every month) have sourced the most satisfying ingredients from local growers.

Speaking of local, don't forget you can get a bottle of  wine at half price when you order two entrees, Monday through Thursday.  For more information check out our Weekday Wine & Dine promotion.

Check out the Farmhouse Menu below for the most updated lineup.

Booker’s Whiskey Notes

Booker’s "Booker'sBottled By: James B. Beam Distilling Co. Clermont,KY

TypeKentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Alcohol content125.6 Proof

Availability US: Available Japan: Available Duty Free: Unknown Europe: Available

History: In 1988, Booker Noe introduced his own signature bourbon, Booker's True Barrel Bourbon. Inspired by a 200-year-old tradition, Booker's is the only bourbon bottled straight-from-the-barrel, uncut and unfiltered. First created as a holiday gift for his special friends, Booker's whiskey was so well-received that he decided to make it available to bourbon lovers worldwide; much to the joy of spirit connoisseurs everywhere. Booker's is the rarest, absolute best bourbon available.

Distinctions:

Booker’s Bourbon is the only uncut, unfiltered, straight-from-the-barrel, connoisseur’s sipping bourbon available today. It’s bottled at its natural proof of between 121 and 127, and aged between six and eight years. Booker Noe, Jim Beam’s grandson and master distiller emeritus, hand selects each barrel that will become Booker’s Bourbon. Each barrel that will become Booker’s bourbon is aged in the very center of the rackhouse where the temperature and humidity combines in the perfect proportion for the finest bourbon. This is truly the absolute best bourbon available. Tasting Notes Age: 6 to 8 years Proof: 121 to 127 Color: Deep, rich, smoky amber Aroma: Big oak, vanilla, smoky charcoal Taste: Intense, fruit, tannin, tobacco Finish: Clean, long, intense Award: Gold Medal Bourbon - Wine Enthusiast Comments: “A tasting of Small Batch Bourbons left me in awe of Booker’s.” – The Chicago Tribune”

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

 

Paddy & Rebreast Irish whiskey

Paddy

Nose: Very linseedy, flowery and appetizing. Palate: Smooth, perfumy. Finish: Mustard. Comment: A classic Irish, though less full in flavour than Jameson.

Nose: Grainy from the off, but just a little more pot still sturdiness than of yore. A touch fruity but overall quite uninspiring. Palate: Much more toffee-vanilla than in recent years; enormously soft and completely lacking richness.

Finish: Dries as the oak takes over; becomes even bitter. Comment:  An unwieldy blend which disappoints thanks to its refusal to offer anything but a grainy, almost metallic hardness against an uncomplex softness.

RedBreast 12yr

There was a time when all Irish whiskeys were ‘pure pot still,’ made with a mixture of malted and unmalted barley, but today Redbreast is a rare survivor of the genre. As such it would be something to cherish even if it were not as excellent as it is. Redbreast dates back to the early 20th century, when the bonding company Gilbey’s of Ireland used the name for Jameson spirit which they matured and bottled, but since the 1990s the brand has been owned by Jameson’s parent company, Irish Distillers Ltd. Redbreast 12-year-old is distilled in Irish Distillers’ vast Midleton complex in County Cork, and maturation takes place principally in former Sherry casks, along with a percentage of ex-Bourbon wood. The result is a robust and deliciously individualistic whiskey, which offers a nose of linseed oil, mixed fruit, Sherry and vanilla. Big and voluptuous in the mouth, with characteristic Irish oiliness, cooked fruits, ginger and a developing nuttiness as it dries gently in a lengthy and well-mannered finish. A classic. 40.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

 

A Review of Bushmills Whiskey's

Bushmills

Rich and concentrated, the first impression is of the sweetness. There are hints of honey, spice and chocolate, so greater complexity is revealed under the initial, very slightly cloying, first layer. It’s more intense than the signature Bushmills but a family resemblance can be clearly detected. Again, the initial impact on the palate is smooth sweetness, as this rich whiskey rolls around the mouth. There are toffee and dark caramel notes here, mingling with spicy hints that open up with a dash of water. Hints of fruit also appear after a while. The toffee develops to a dark chocolate on a lingering finish that holds together well. I've rated this 3.5 stars, but if you’re a fan of Bushmills it's worth 4, because you’ll probably love this! 46.0% ABV,

Bushmills Black

Bushmills distillery in County Antrim is currently celebrating the 400 anniversary of a licence being granted to distil in the area, so it is fitting that July’s Whisky of the Month is Black Bush. Bushmills is owned by Diageo and triple distils malt whiskey, which is mixed with grain spirit from Midleton distillery in County Cork to create the Bushmills family of blended Irish whiskeys. Black Bush contains a significantly higher proportion of malt than the popular ‘Original’ brand, and also benefits from the fact that the malt component is matured for between eight and ten years in ex-Oloroso Sherry casks prior to blending. Rich and enticing on the nose, with sweet Sherry, characteristic Irish whiskey oiliness, honey and blackcurrants. The palate is a complex blend of sweet and more austere, slightly metallic, notes; Sherry, Fry’s Turkish Delight, autumn berries and restrained cinnamon spice. Water teases out more Irish oil. The finish offers an initial fudge note that dries slowly and elegantly through treacle toffee to pleasing oak. Undoubtedly one of the world’s great blended whiskeys. 40.0% ABV

Bushmills 10yr

Nose: Distinctly almondy. Some soft, perfumy, winey spiciness. Palate: Toasted almonds, raisins, slightly burnt toffee. Finish: Delicate, elusive, flavours. Long, soft, soothing. Comment: All the woods are influential, especially the port in the finish. A very dexterous balancing act, but is the house character eventually overwhelmed

Nose: Intense malt with a unmistakable sherry richness. Quite firm, fruity and clean. Palate:Sweet, quite lush start: malt, sherry and soft spice. Finish: Lashings of toffee with bigger sherry than of old. Dark fudge sweetness gives way to much drier cocoa notes. Comment: A bigger whisky than of a year or two back with the sherry making a much bigger impression. Quite fruity and full where once it was slightly powdery and over-dependent on the malt character alone.

 

Bushmills 16yr

Nose: Distinctly nutty, but also with those linseedy Irish flavours. some soft, perfumy, spiciness. Palate: Toasted almonds, raisin, slightly burnt toffee. Finish: Delicate, elusive, flavours. Long, soft, soothing. Comment: All the woods are influential, especially the port in the finish. A dextrous balancing act.

Nose: Beautifully scented with honey, sweet apples, pears, bananas and sherry. Palate: Delicious, malt roundedness, rich fruit and nuttiness peep through the sherry and port structure. Finish: Lingering sweet fruit salad character and the lightest trace of peat. Comment: Absolutely charming Bushmills. Expertly composed.

 

Bushmills 21yr

Nose: Pronounced Madeira ' toffee' character. Palate: Smooth, sweet, succulent. Marzipan. Glazed almonds. Finish: Dusting of ginger. Comment: A delicious whisky. The sweetness and nuttiness of Bushmills whiskey and of Madeira are an enjoyable double-act. The whiskey has to work hard to avoid being upstaged

Nose: A lifted, perfumed fruit-filled nose, soft and pulpy, apricot yoghurt and crannachan (raspberry oats sugar and cream). Palate: Starts sweet, soft and juicy starting with apricot ending up with redcurrant and cherry. Finish: A very light smokiness. Comment: Lovely balance. A whisky for those who like things on the fruity side.

 

 

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

 

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

BloomsDay is Here!

Bloomsday performers outside Davy Byrne's pub

A few facts about Bloomsday for anyone who wants to come down to the pub and raise a pint or two!

Bloomsday is a commemoration observed annually on June 16th in Dublin and elsewhere to celebrate the life of Irish writer James Joyce and relive the events in his novel Ulysses, all of which took place on the same day in Dublin in 1904. Joyce chose the date because his first outing with his wife-to-be, Nora Barnacle happened on that day, when they walked to the Dublin urban village ofRingsend. The name derives from Leopold Bloom, the protagonist of Ulysses.

Bloomsday activities

Street party in North Great George's Street, 2004

The day involves a range of cultural activities including Ulysses readings and dramatisations, pub crawls and general merriment, much of it hosted by the James Joyce Centre in North Great George's Street. Enthusiasts often dress in Edwardian costume to celebrate Bloomsday, and retrace Bloom's route around Dublin via landmarks such as Davy Byrne's pub. Hard-core devotees have even been known to hold marathon readings of the entire novel, some lasting up to 36 hours. The first celebration took place in 1954, and a major five-month-long festival (ReJoyce Dublin 2004) took place in Dublin between 1 April and 31 August 2004. On the Sunday in 2004 before the 100th "anniversary" of the fictional events described in the book, 10,000 people in Dublin were treated to a free, open-air, full Irish breakfast on O'Connell Street consisting of sausagesrasherstoastbeans, and black and white puddings.

On Bloomsday 1982, the centenary year of Joyce's birth, Irish state broadcaster, RTÉ, transmitted a continuous 30-hour dramatic performance of the entire text of Ulysses on radio.

The Rosenbach Museum & Library in Philadelphia is the home of the handwritten manuscript ofUlysses and celebrates Bloomsday with a street festival including readings, Irish music, and traditional Irish cuisine provided by local Irish-themed pubs.

The Syracuse James Joyce Club holds an annual Bloomsday celebration at Johnston's BallyBay Pub in Syracuse, New York, at which large portions of the book are either read aloud, or presented as dramatizations by costumed performers. The club awards scholarships and other prizes to students who have written essays on Joyce or fiction pertaining to his work. The city is home to Syracuse University, whose press has published or reprinted several volumes of Joyce studies.

 

Reading from Ulysses on top of James Joyce Tower and Museum, June 2009

In 2004 Vintage Publishers issued yes I said yes I will Yes: A Celebration of James Joyce, Ulysses, and 100 Years of Bloomsday, edited by Nola Tully. It is one of the few monographs that details the increasing popularity of Bloomsday. The book's title comes from the novel's famous last lines.

Bloomsday has also been celebrated since 1994 in the Hungarian town of Szombathely, the fictional birthplace of Leopold Bloom's father, Virág Rudolf, an emigrant Hungarian Jew. The event is usually centered around the Iseum, the remnants of an Isis temple from Roman times, and the Blum-mansion, commemorated to Joyce since 1997, at 40–41 Fő street, which used to be the property of an actual Jewish family called Blum. Hungarian author László Najmányi in his 2007 novel, The Mystery of the Blum-mansion (A Blum-ház rejtélye) describes the results of his research on the connection between Joyce and the Blum family.

There have been many Bloomsday events in Trieste, where the first part of Ulysses was written; a Joyce Museum was opened there on 16 June 2004. Since 2005 Bloomsday has been celebrated every year in Genoa, with a reading of Ulysses in Italian by volunteers (students, actors, teachers, scholars), starting at 9 A.M. and finishing in the early hours of 17 June; the readings take place in 18 different places in the old town centre, one for each chapter of the novel, and these places are selected for their resemblance to the original settings. Thus for example chapter 1 is read in a medieval tower, chapter 2 in a classroom of the Faculty of Languages, chapter 3 in a bookshop on the waterfront, chapter 9 in the University Library, and chapter 12 ("Cyclops") in an old pub. The Genoa Bloomsday is organized by the Faculty of Languages and the International Genoa Poetry Festival.

New York City has several events on Bloomsday including formal readings at Symphony Space and informal readings and music at the downtown Ulysses' Folk House pub.[1]

First Bloomsday Celebration

 

First bloom:John RyanAnthony Cronin,Brian O'NolanPatrick Kavanagh & Tom Joyce (James Joyce's cousin); Sandymount, 1954

Bloomsday (a term Joyce himself did not employ) was invented in 1954, on the 50th anniversary of the events in the novel, when John Ryan (artist, critic, publican and founder of Envoy magazine) and the novelist Flann O'Brienorganised what was to be a daylong pilgrimage along the Ulysses route. They were joined by Patrick Kavanagh,Anthony Cronin, Tom Joyce (a dentist who, as Joyce's cousin, represented the family interest) and AJ Leventhal (Registrar of Trinity College). Ryan had engaged two horse drawn cabs, of the old-fashioned kind, which in Ulysses Mr. Bloom and his friends drive to poor Paddy Dignam's funeral. The party were assigned roles from the novel. They planned to travel round the city through the day, visiting in turn the scenes of the novel, ending at night in what had once been the brothel quarter of the city, the area which Joyce had called Nighttown. The pilgrimage was abandoned halfway through, when the weary Lestrygonians succumbed to inebriation and rancour at the Bailey pub in the city centre, which Ryan then owned, and at which, in 1967, he installed the door to No. 7 Eccles Street (Leopold Bloom’s front door) having rescued it from demolition . A Bloomsday record of 1954, informally filmed by John Ryan, follows this pilgrimage.[2]

Popular culture references

In 1956, Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath were married by special licence of the Archbishop of Canterbury at St George the Martyr Church, Holborn, on 16 June, in honour of Bloomsday.[3]

Jefferson Airplane's 1967 album After Bathing at Baxter's contains the track, "Rejoyce", inspired by Joyce's Ulysses.

In Mel Brooks' 1968 film The ProducersGene Wilder's character is called Leo Bloom, an homage to Joyce's character. In the musical 2005 version, in the evening scene at the Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, Leo asks, "When will it be Bloom's day?". However, in the earlier scene in which Bloom first meets Max Bialystock, the office wall calendar shows that the current day is 16 June, indicating that it is, in fact, Bloomsday.

Punk band Minutemen have a song on their 1984 Double Nickels on the Dime album entitled "June 16th".

Richard Linklater references Ulysses in two of his films. Once in 1991's Slacker, where a character reads an excerpt from Ulysses after convincing his friends to dump a tent and a typewriter in a river as a response to a prior lover's infidelity. And again in 1995's Before Sunrise, where the events take place on 16 June.

In 2009 an episode of the cartoon The Simpsons, "In the Name of the Grandfather", featured the family's trip to Dublin and Lisa's reference to Bloomsday.

Pat Conroy's 2009 novel "South of Broad" has numerous references to Bloomsday. From the publisher's blurb: "Against the sumptuous backdrop of Charleston, South Carolina, South of Broad gathers a unique cast of sinners and saints. Leopold Bloom King, our narrator, is the son of an amiable, loving father who teaches science at the local high school. His mother, an ex-nun, is the high school principal and a well-known Joyce scholar. ..." The book's first chapter describes the events of 16 June 1969 in Leo's story.

U2's 2009 song "Breathe" refers to events taking place on a fictitious 16 June.

 

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

 

Presenting “The Lighter Side of Ireland” Summer Menus

Crisp-fried fish. Savory cream sauce. Thick sizzling bacon.

While these traditional Irish food staples will always make your mouth water, they might not be what you always want to order—especially during the hot Sacramento summer months. Luckily, we have special, less-heavy menus options for you to indulge in while the mercury rises. For the first time ever, we're presenting a "Lighter Side of Ireland" dining experience—all summer long!

Starting this month, the progressive 3-phase menu gives you an opportunity to try less traditional, more refreshing fare (proving that Irish cuisine is much more than filling potatoes and gravy). It's our nod to the current food movement happening in Ireland right now.

Here's what we're serving: June’s Seaside Menu will offer fresh seafood specials. (Check it out here.) July’s Farm House Menu will feature a variety of savory meats and vegetables. Finally, August’s Urban Menu will highlight the modern side of Irish food. What's even more impressive is that options will change weekly. Our chefs Wes and Ricky have been busy—and extra creative!

If you come in Monday through Thursday, we'll be offering an incredible wine special.  Buy any two entrées from the special menus and get half off any  bottle of wine!

We hope everyone comes to join us for this culinary adventure and enjoy tasting

food from the ocean, the farm, and modern-day Ireland.

 

A Review of the Jameson Whiskey Family Line Up

Jameson

Nose: Very aromatic. Waxy orange skins. Linseed oil. Leather. Palate: Big, oily, creamy, sociable. Finish: Delicate. Peppery. More-ish. Comment: A superb Irish for everyday drinking. I love this, though not quite as much as the Gold.

Nose: A meeting of oloroso and crisp pot still character. Malty, too. Lovely fruitcake richness, though not as sweet as in recent years. Palate: Very firm, oily, intense and mouthfilling. Finish: A hint of spice counters an increasing oaky bitterness though the barley and sherry last to the very end. Comment: Five or six years back I panned this whiskey: it was lacking in pot still character. Not any more. Now genuinely impressive, charming and characterfull

 

Jameson 12yr

Nose: Leather handbags, new car smell. Seville oranges and dusk in Valencia. Palate: I have died and gone to heaven. Warm oily spice, cardamom, cinnamon and some damn fine sherry notes. Finish: Rumbles on for ages. Tickling pepper and milk chocolate. Comment: For the money, this is the best damn blend you will ever, ever taste.

Nose: Lush and rich. Some oily pot still notes. Ripe fruit, melon, spices, oak notes, charcoal, some raisin/sultana. With water: cocoa butter, tea cake. Palate: Clean and slightly malty start. Stretches across the palate. Semi-dried peach softness, crisp cereal/oak. Balanced, honeyed and soft.

Finish: Herbal. Comment: Much more like it. Has the rich velvety juicy fruitiness of good Irish.

Jameson Gold

Nose: Light. Fresh wood. Vanilla. Distinctly buttery. Palate: Creamy. Vanilla. Fresh apple. Honey. Finish: Lightly toasty. Fresh-cut cedar. Comment: There is some virgin oak in this one, along with bourbon casks. Bonus points for trying something new, but would have expected more interesting results. I find it a bit light tasting. Try it with fresh brown bread and Dublin Bay prawns.

Nose: Layered elements of soft honey and subtle oak criss-crossing the crisp pot-still. Palate: Truly magnificent honey-barley notes. Finish: Silky and subtle, an essay in bittersweet balance with the final, drier bitter notes reminding you of some decent age. Comment: No two vattings are ever the same. However, astonishingly high quality every time. The most complex Irish of them all; a blenders triumph.

Jameson 18yr

Nose: Fresh, clean linen. Alder. Bath oil. Palate: Firm. Oiled wood. Out of the sauna to a cup of tea. Quite strong flavours. Aromatic and refreshing. Finish: Gunpowder tea. A minor explosion. Comment: Robustly sexy. I always enjoy Jameson, but I really relished coming to grips with this one.

Nose: Soft, rich, juicy: apricot, dried fruits, orange, butterscotch, hazelnut butter. Water brings out sherry, becoming chocolate and bourbon biscuit. Palate: A luscious, oily sweetness with a crisp solidity on the palate, then a burst of dried fruits, spices and citrus fruits. Finish: Rich, soft honeyed. Comment: I could drink this all day. A classic Irish whiskey.

 

Jameson 21yr

Eye: Amber, dark

Nose:  Citrus, overripe autumn fruit, honey, fudge and mildly spicy, and it must be said that they all comes together rather beautifully.

Taste: Very smooth indeed, with hints of leather, vanilla fudge, nuts – and there is no hiding that it has spent some time in a sherry cask; overall very well balanced with a nice, rounded, sweet aftertaste that lingers pleasantly in your mouth.

Jameson Vintage

The Pernod Ricard-owned Jameson brand is the world’s best-selling Irish whiskey, and is produced in the company’s extremely versatile distillery at Midleton in County Cork, which dates from 1974. There an array of pot and column stills produce spirit that is blended together in bewildering and classified combinations and proportions for the various expressions that make up the Jameson range, and many other brands besides. The latest addition to Jameson’s line up of ‘Reserve’ whiskeys, Vintage Reserve, takes to the shelves alongside Jameson 12 Year Old Special, Jameson Gold and Jameson 18 Year Old Limited Reserve. The four Reserve expressions are all matured in a mixture of ex-Bourbon and ex-Oloroso Sherry casks, and combine triple-distilled pot and column still spirit. Vintage Reserve contains some of the rarest whiskeys available from Midleton, and one of the component pot stills whiskeys has been matured in port pipes. The oldest element of Vintage Reserve is the grain, some of which is up to 25 years old, and all of the Bourbon casks used are second-fill. Light, floral honey notes from the aged grain component are present on the early nose, along with fleshy peaches and melons. The port casks contribute rich, fruity characteristics, which are sufficiently subtle not to dominate. Barley lingers in the nostrils. The sweet, mellow palate offers bananas and plums, along with developing cinnamon, toasted oak and dairy fudge notes. The finish is long, with sweet fruits, port, spice and a hint of barley. By no means cheap, but this is a confident, sophisticated and beautifully integrated whiskey that has all the makings of an Irish classic. 46.0% ABV

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

 

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try these Whiskeys at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

Sacramento's Largest Whiskey List

We have built our whiskey list over the past two years and are adding whiskey's every week.  We will create links between this list and our reviews of each whiskey as we post them to our blog.  We hope you will enjoy our whiskey bar in the heart of downtown Sacramento.  The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub.  Grab a friend and come down for an incredible experience!

Bourbon

Bourbon is an American whiskey, like Bulliet or Maker’s Mark, made from at least 51% corn and aged at least two years in new charred oak barrels.   Bourbon that meets the above requirements, has been aged for a minimum of two years, and has no added coloring, flavoring, or other spirit may be called Straight bourbon.

Basil Hayden’s 8yr

Booker’s

Bulleit

Buffalo Trace

Eagle Rare

Eagle Rare 17yr

Four Roses

George T. Stagg

Jim Beam

Jim Beam Black

Johnny Drum 101pr

Kentucky Vintage 17yr

Kentucky Vintage 21yr

Kentucky Vintage 25yr

Knob Creek

Maker’s Mark

Maker’s 46

Michter’s US 1

Noah’s Mill

Old Bardstown Estate

Old Forester

Old Forester Birthday

Pappy Van Winkle 12yr

Pappy Van Winkle 15yr

Pappy Van Winkle 20yr

Pappy Van Winkle 23yr

Pure Kentucky XO

Rip Van Winkle 10yr 90pr

Rip Van Winkle 12yr 107pr

Rowan’s Creek 12yr

Wild Turkey 101pr

Willett Reserve

Willett Family Estate 6yr

Willett Family Estate 13yr

William Larue Weller

Woodford Reserve

Rye Whiskey

Rye whiskey is made from a mash of at least 51% rye. Other ingredients are usually corn and malted barley. It must be aged in charred, new oak barrels. Rye whiskey that has been aged for at least 2 years may be further designated as "straight".

High West Silver

High West Bourye

High West Rendezvous

High West 16yr

High West 21yr

Michter’s US 1

Michter’s 10yr

Rip Van Winkle 13yr

Sazerac 6yr

Sazarac –Thomas Handy

Whiskey

Uisce beatha is Gaelic for “water of life”. Whiskey is a distilled spirit made from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat and corn.

Crown Royal

Crown Royal Reserve

Crown Cask No. 16

Leopold’s Peach

Pendleton

Pendryn

Seagram’s 7

Tennessee Whiskey

Tennessee whiskey is different from bourbon by one key exception - it’s charcoal filtered before aging in barrels, and it has to be distilled in Tennessee.

George Dickel

Jack Daniel’s

Jack Daniel’s SB

Gentleman Jack

Irish Whiskey

Irish whiskey must be distilled and aged in the republic of Ireland or in Northern Ireland. It must be aged for at least three years in wooden casks. If the spirits comprise a blend of two or more distillates, the product is referred to as a “Blended” Irish whiskey.

Bushmills

Bushmills Black

Bushmills 10yr

Bushmills 16yr

Bushmills 21yr

Connemara

Connemara Cask

Finian’s

Jameson

Jameson 12yr

Jameson Gold

Jameson 18yr

Jameson 21yr

Jameson Vintage

John Powers

John Powers 12yr

Kilbeggan

Knappogue Castle

Michael Collins

Michael Collins SM

Midleton Rare

Paddy

Red Breast 12yr

Red Breast 15yr

Slane Castle

Tyrconnell

Tyrconnell Madera

Tyrconnell Port

Tyrconnell Sherry

Tullamore Dew

Tullamore Dew 10yr

Tullamore Dew 12yr

Scotch

Scottish whisky is aged in oak casks for at least three years. In Scotland, however, it’s just called whisky. Depending on the region, the Scotch may have different flavors - those from Islay, pronounced “eye-la,” for example, tend to have a smoky, peaty flavor. While those from Speyside, like Macallan, are known for their smooth caramel flavors.

Islay

Ardbeg 10yr

Bowmore 12yr

Bruichladdich 12yr

Bruichladdich 14yr

Caol Ila 12yr

Lagavulin 12yr

Lagavulin 16yr

Lagavulin 1993

Laphroaig 10yr

Peat Monster

Speyside

Balvenie 12yr

Balvenie 15yr

Balvenie 21yr

Craigellachie 16yr

Dewar’s White

Dewar’s 12yr

Dewar’s 18yr

Dewar’s Signature

Glenfiddich 12yr

Glenfiddich 15yr

Glenfiddich 18yr

Glenfiddich 21yr

Glenfiddich DE 102pr

Glenlivet 12yr

Glenlivet 15yr

Gelnlivet 16 Nadura

Glenlivet 18yr

Glenrothes Select Rsv.

Glenrothes 1991

Macallan 12yr

Macallan 14yr

Macallan 18yr

Macallan 21yr

Singleton 12yr

Speyburn 10yr

Island

Highland Park 12yr

Inchmurrin 12yr

Scapa 1993

Talisker 10yr

 

Lowland

Glenkinchie 12yr

J.W. Black 12yr

J.W. Blue

J.W. Gold 18yr

J.W. Green 15yr

J.W. Red

Highland

Chivas Regal 12yr

Clynelish 14yr

Dalwhinnie 15yr

Deanston 12yr

Glen Garioch 8yr

Glenmorangie 10yr

Glenmorangie 18yr

Oban 14yr

Oban 1993 DE

Stronachie 12yr

Stronachie 17yr

Campbeltown

Cadenhead’s

Springbank CV

Springbank 10yr

Springbank 15yr

Grain

Milford 10yr

Pig’s Nose 5yr

Sheeps Dip

Sheeps Dip 1990

Yamazaki 12yr

Yamazaki 18y

A note from de Vere’s Irish Pub:

Our management staff at de Vere’s Pub is dedicated to building Sacramento’s largest whiskey list. We add whiskeys to our list as often as possible, in order to offer our guests the best and most comprehensive assortment in Northern California. To further educate our patrons (and ourselves), we like to post reviews of these whiskeys on our blog. This lets our guests read up on the whiskeys we offer before coming to visit our whiskey bar—which we know you’ll fall in love with upon your first visit.

The whiskey bar is located in the back room of our Irish Pub in downtown Sacramento, which is owned and operated by an Irish family. We understand that you have a lot of choices in the bars and restaurants that you frequent in the Sacramento area, and we hope that we can earn your patronage by providing you with a one-of-a-kind experience. Our goal is to provide you with the best place in town to eat, drink, and socialize with your family and friends. So, grab a friend and come down for an incredible whiskey and dining experience!

You can try all of these Whiskeys at  de Vere’s Pub in downtown Sacramento.

Join our Whiskey Society to learn more about Whiskey's at a discount!

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

Sacramento Burger Month's Week 1 Burger: The Tostada Burger

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger

Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

To Vote for this burger click here

To Learn what's Next click here

To Vote for the 4th week burger click here

 

All About Sacramento Burger Month at de Vere's Pub! (Part One)

Sac Burger Month (or  hashtag #sacburgermonth on Twitter) is a joint effort between de Vere’s Irish Pub in Since May is officially National Hamburger Month, we thought it would be great to promote burger awareness here in our beautiful city of Sacramento.

Each week in May, the fine chefs at de Vere’s Irish Pub will be showcasing a unique featured burger masterpiece that will only be available for that week only.

Here’s the Burger Breakdown:

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger

Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

 

Week 2: Sunday May 8 – Saturday May 14

The Firestone Burger

Firestone Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Firestone Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

This juicy cheeseburger is cooked in a red wine, shallots, and balsamic vinegar based sauce that gives it a powerful sweet and tangy flavor.  The double ground smoked beef patty is infused with smoked pork and topped with bacon, smoked cheddar goat cheese and fried onions. This flavorful burger is served on a lightly toasted, locally sourced, freshly baked bun.

We paired this burger with an Abbey ale from New Belgium Brewery out of Colorado. The chocolatey undertones allow this beer to hold its own with the smokiness of the Firestone Burger.

 

Week 3: Sunday May 15 – Saturday May 21

The Stadium Burger

Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub
Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

 

Local sports fans, this one is for you! This double ground beef patty is stuffed with 1.5 ounces of sharp cheddar cheese, coated with whole grain mustard, and smothered with a house made relish containing delicious peppadews. The chef’s searched far and wide for the perfect soft pretzel bun to compliment this beautiful burger creation.

Henry personally selected an organic wheat beer that goes perfectly with the pickled peppered flavors that top this burger. Mothership Wit from New Belgium Brewery is brewed with wheat and barley malt, as well as coriander and orange peel spicing resulting in a balance of citrus and sour flavors held in suspension by a bright burst of carbonation.

 

Week 4: Sunday May 22- Saturday May 28

YOU DECIDE!

Vote for our last Weekly Featured Burger
Vote for our last Weekly Featured Burger 

We haven’t picked the burger for Week 4 yet.

Your votes for the 4th Week #sacburgermonth burger will decide which one gets featured on the menu!

The de Vere’s chefs have dreamed up 2 crazy burger creations for #sacburgermonth Week 4, but only 1 can be on the menu.

Help us choose the Week 4 Featured Burger by taking our 5 second survey and be entered into a chance to win a t-shirt and free $25 Gift Card from de Vere’s Irish Pub!

Will it be:

A Prime Rib Burger with carmalized onions manchango cheese, Horse radish mayo and Au Jus

Or will it be:

A Philly Burger Pepercorned crusted all beef patty with house made Pastrami , house made sour kraut, and swiss cheese with a roasted red pepper mayo.

Cast Your Vote

Sacramento and BurgerJunkies.com (a burger review blog).

Sac Burger Month (or  hashtag #sacburgermonth on Twitter) is a joint effort between de Vere’s Irish Pub in

Celebrating National Hamburger Month locally with #sacburgermonth

by Rodney on April 29, 2011 in Site Announcements

May is National Hamburger Month and what better way for Sacramento, CA, one of themost Twitter connected cities, to celebrate than with #sacburgermonth

What is #sacburgermonth?

You can get the full details at sacburgermonth.com, but here’s the highlights:

Think of it as a celebration of all things hamburger in our wonderful city of trees.

#sacburgermonth is brought to you by de Vere's Irish Pub and BurgerJunkies.com

We’ve teamed up with the chefs at de Vere’s Irish Pub in Sacramento to bring you 4 amazing weekly Featured Burgersand some fun giveaways (including a digital camera giveaway from BurgerJunkies.com)!

The Burgers:

(each premium burger comes with fries and a carefully selected beer pairing for just $15)

 

Week 1: Sunday May 1 – Saturday May 7

The Tostada Burger Tostada Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

Served on a lightly toasted, locally baked bun from The Grateful Bread, this freshly double ground beef burger is topped with a crispy tostada and corn pico de gallo salsa con queso. The burger itself sits on another layer of the house made salsa, a nice red tomato slice and another tostada layer to give it a great crunch. For an added kick, the buns are lightly spread with a made-from-scratch Serrano chili mayonnaise.

This burger is paired with a classic Corona beer during Cinco de Mayo week where de Vere’s will be celebrating the Batallón de San Patricio (aka Drinko de Mayo)

 

Week 2: Sunday May 8 – Saturday May 14

The Firestone Burger

Firestone Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

This juicy cheeseburger is cooked in a red wine, shallots, and balsamic vinegar based sauce that gives it a powerful sweet and tangy flavor.  The double ground smoked beef patty is infused with smoked pork and topped with bacon, smoked cheddar goat cheese and fried onions. This flavorful burger is served on a lightly toasted, locally sourced, freshly baked bun.

We paired this burger with an Abbey ale from New Belgium Brewery out of Colorado. The chocolatey undertones allow this beer to hold its own with the smokiness of the Firestone Burger.

 

Week 3: Sunday May 15 – Saturday May 21

The Stadium Burger

Stadium Burger at de Vere's Irish Pub

Local sports fans, this one is for you! This double ground beef patty is stuffed with 1.5 ounces of sharp cheddar cheese, coated with whole grain mustard, and smothered with a house made relish containing delicious peppadews. The chef’s searched far and wide for the perfect soft pretzel bun to compliment this beautiful burger creation.

Henry personally selected an organic wheat beer that goes perfectly with the pickled peppered flavors that top this burger. Mothership Wit from New Belgium Brewery is brewed with wheat and barley malt, as well as coriander and orange peel spicing resulting in a balance of citrus and sour flavors held in suspension by a bright burst of carbonation.

 

Week 4: Sunday May 22- Saturday May 28

YOU DECIDE!

Vote for our last Weekly Featured Burger

We haven’t picked the burger for Week 4 yet.

Your votes for the 4th Week #sacburgermonth burger will decide which one gets featured on the menu!

The de Vere’s chefs have dreamed up 2 crazy burger creations for #sacburgermonth Week 4, but only 1 can be on the menu.

Help us choose the Week 4 Featured Burger by taking our 5 second survey and be entered into a chance to win a t-shirt and free $25 Gift Card from de Vere’s Irish Pub!

Will it be:

A Prime Rib Burger with carmalized onions manchango cheese, Horse radish mayo and Au Jus

Or will it be:

A Philly Burger Pepercorned crusted all beef patty with house made Pastrami , house made sour kraut, and swiss cheese with a roasted red pepper mayo.

Cast Your Vote

 

The Contests:

 

  1. 1. Enter a random drawing to win a Canon DSLR Digital Camera from BurgerJunkies.com by tweeting about #sacburgermonth on Twitter. See How To Enter
  2.  

  3. 2. Enter a random drawing to win a free $25 de Vere’s Irish Pub gift card and t-shirt by helping us select the #sacburgermonth Week 4 Featured Burger! Vote for a chance to win
  4.  

  5. 3. Enter a random drawing to win a free $25 de Vere’s Irish Pub gift card and t-shirt by voting for your favorite #sacburgermonth Weekly Featured Burger!Vote for a chance to win
  6.  

  7. 4. Be the first to spot all 4 #sacburgermonth Featured Burgers at de Vere’s Irish Pub on Foodspotting to win a free “I Love Hamburgers” t-shirt from BurgerJunkies.com Start Foodspotting
  8.  

 

Irish pub to replace Soga's

"Brothers Simon and Henry de Vere White are co-owners of the popular de Vere's Irish Pub in Sacramento and will be branching out to Davis by September 2011. The de Vere Whites hail from Ireland and plan to bring an Irish flair to the Downtown Davis dining experience.

"We're an Irish pub, we cater to a wide variety of people, from families with kids to the business community," said Simon. "We're very food focused here, so I think what helps us be successful is being family owned and operated."

De Vere's Irish Pub signed a 10-year lease at 217 E St., a 4,800 square foot location formerly occupied by Soga's. The new location is 1,000 square feet larger than the Sacramento location.

De Vere's will take over the building formerly occupied by Soga's, an Italian and American food restaurant that permanently closed on Nov. 21 2010, after filing for bankruptcy.

"We liked the look of the building, we wanted to be downtown," said Simon. "We thought that downtown Davis had a great feel to it, and it seems that that's where the focus of the food industry is."

De Vere's will provide a hearty menu filled with traditional Irish food, as well as the familiar cheeseburger and sandwich for the more timid restaurant-goers.

Most of the food served will be made fresh in-house, including curing their own bacon, butchering their own meat and making their own pudding.

"We like to say we make everything here, except for Ranch," said Simon.

Despite Soga's recent bankruptcy, the de Vere Whites were not discouraged from branching out into Davis with a second pub after two successful years in Sacramento.

"We were always very intrigued with Davis. Great community and culture there. Family-oriented town, family business," said Simon. "We thought that going into a place that has a university system was very compelling and thought we would be a good fit for Davis."

For those looking for an authentic Irish pub experience, de Vere's is the place to go. De Vere's Irish Pub provides both authentic Irish cuisine and authentic Irish interior design complete with family pictures, paintings and Irish antiques.

"In Ireland, kids are at the pubs. You're born in the pub, grow up in the pub, get married in the pub," said Simon. "Every Sunday is family Sunday, we discount the kids menu. We definitely try to attract the family aspect."

De Vere's, winner of Sacramento Magazine's Best Pub Food award of 2010, prides itself on its hospitality, food and cozy atmosphere.

The opening of de Vere's is good news for the alcohol savvy as well, offering an extensive alcohol menu with 89 varieties of whiskey and 66 varieties of scotch."

 

DYLAN AARON can be reached at city@theaggie.org.

 

The History of Bourbon

"Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

On 4 May 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:

  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
  • Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
  • Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
  • Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
  • Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
  • Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
  • Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
  • Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
  • If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as "straight bourbon"—with or without the "straight bourbon" label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months.

Production process:

The typical grain mixture for bourbon, known as the mash bill, is 70% corn with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. The grain is ground, dissolved in water, and usually, though not always, mash from a previous distillation is added to ensure a consistent pH across batches. Finally, yeast is added and the mash is fermented. The fermented mash is then distilled to (typically) between 65% and 80% alcohol.

This clear spirit is placed in charred oak barrels for aging, during which it gains color and flavor from the wood. Changes to the spirit also occur due to evaporation and chemical processes such as oxidation. Bourbons gain more color and flavor the longer they age. Maturity, not a particular age, is the goal. Bourbon can age too long and become woody and unbalanced.

After aging, bourbon is withdrawn from the barrel, usually diluted with water and bottled to at least 80 US proof (40% abv). Most bourbon whiskey is sold at 80 US proof. Other common proofs are 86, 90, 94, 100 and 107, and whiskeys of up to 151 proof have been sold. Some higher proof bottlings are "barrel proof," meaning that they have not been diluted after removal from the barrels.

Bourbon whiskey may be sold at less than 80 proof but must be labeled as "diluted bourbon."

Geographic origin:

Bourbon may be produced anywhere in the United States where it is legal to distill spirits. Currently most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon has a strong association. Estimates are that 95% of the world's bourbon is distilled and aged in Kentucky. Bourbon has also been made in Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Bardstown, Kentucky, is called the Bourbon Capital of the World and is home to the annual Bourbon Festival in September.

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to eight well-known distilleries: Buffalo Trace (Frankfort), Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker's Mark (Loretto), Tom Moore (Bardstown, added to the trail on August 27, 2008), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles).

History:

Oak casks, shown stacked in ricks, used to store and age bourbon. Bourbon, or rather whiskey in general, that escapes naturally from the wooden casks, as seen by the stains along the sides of the barrels, is known to distillers as the "angel's share".

The origin of bourbon is not well documented. Instead, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, "a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste."[7] Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product "Bourbon whiskey." Spears' home, Stone Castle, warehouse and spring house survive; one can drive by the Spears home on Clay-Kaiser Road.

It should be noted that Berkley Plantation in Virginia lays claim to the first bourbon whiskey produced in 1621, by George Thorpe, an Episcopal priest, although they did not call it "bourbon" at the time.

Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single "inventor" of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century.[8]

Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, German, and French) began to farm the area in earnest in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved and gained a name in the early 19th century.

When American pioneers pushed west of the Allegheny Mountains following the American Revolution, the first counties they founded covered vast regions. One of these original, huge counties was Bourbon, established in 1785 and named after the French royal family. While this vast county was being carved into many smaller ones, early in the 19th century, many people continued to call the region Old Bourbon. Located within Old Bourbon was the principal Ohio River port from which whiskey and other products were shipped. "Old Bourbon" was stencilled on the barrels to indicate their port of origin. Old Bourbon whiskey was different because it was the first corn whiskey most people had ever tasted. In time, bourbon became the name for any corn-based whiskey.[9]

A refinement variously credited to either James C. Crow or Jason S. Amburgey[10] was the sour mash process, by which each new fermentation is conditioned with some amount of spent mash (previously fermented mash that has been separated from its alcohol). Spent mash is also known as spent beer, distillers' spent grain, stillage, and slop or feed mash, so named because it is used as animal feed. The acid introduced by using the sour mash controls the growth of bacteria that could taint the whiskey and creates a proper pH balance for the yeast to work.

As of 2005[update], all straight bourbons use a sour mash process. Crow or Amburgey developed this refinement while working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky. As of today, there are no running distilleries within the current boundaries of Bourbon County due to new counties being formed from Bourbon County over time.

A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a "distinctive product of the United States." That resolution asked "the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as 'Bourbon Whiskey.'"Federal regulation now defines "bourbon whiskey" to only include "bourbon" produced in the United States.

National Bourbon Heritage Month:

On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 "National Bourbon Heritage Month," marking the history of bourbon whiskey.  Notably, the resolution claims that Congress declared bourbon to be "America's Native Spirit" in its 1964 resolution.  The 1964 resolution, however, does not contain such a statement per se; it only declares that bourbon is a distinctive product identifiable with the United States in the same way that Scotch is identifiable with Scotland.  The resolution has been passed each year since.

Present day:

Since 2003, high-end bourbons have seen revenue grow from $450 million to over $500 million (£231 million to over £257 million or €308 million to over €343 million), some 2.2 million cases, in the United States. High-end bourbon sales accounted for eight percent of total spirits growth in 2006. Most high-end bourbons are aged for six years or longer.[15]

In 2007, United States spirits exports, virtually all of which are American whiskey, exceeded $1 billion for the first time. This represents a 15 percent increase over 2006. American whiskey is now sold in more than 100 countries. The leading markets are the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Japan. Key emerging markets for American whiskey are China, Vietnam, Brazil, Chile, Romania, and Bulgaria.

You can try a lot of the  Whiskey's in this post  at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

De Vere's expanding to Davis

"De Vere’s Irish Pub, a locally owned downtown business founded in the midst of the recession, will open its second location at the end of the summer in the space that was formerly the home of Soga’s in Davis.

“We’re excited,” said co-owner Simon de Vere White. “We’ve been eying Davis for a long time.”

The new space, at 217 E St. in downtown Davis, is 4,800 square feet, about 1,000 square feet bigger than the Sacramento pub.

His brother, co-owner Henry de Vere White, said the expansion is a risk, but one he hopes will prove as successful as the current location on 15th and L streets in Sacramento.

“I think we filled a niche here in Sacramento," Simon de Vere White said, adding that the brothers hope to do the same in Davis.

The basic concept will be the same, as they said community involvement at all levels is important to success.

“We are a neighborhood Irish pub,” Henry de Vere White said. “We do lunch and dinner, and you see the little ones coming in, and then at night it gets a little bit (of an older crowd).”

According to Christi Skibbins, executive director of the Davis Chamber of Commerce, E Street is often referred to as “Eat Street.”

“E Street is a street a lot of people call Eat Street because there are so many restaurants and bars,” she said. “It will be a good spot for them. They’re right across from E Street Plaza, so there is plenty of parking, and it has easy access from all of Davis.”

The Davis pub will have the same menu as de Vere’s in Sacramento when it comes to drinks and food, but possibly with more emphasis on hamburgers with the large student population, Simon de Vere White said.

“It’s too early to tell, but that’s something we will work out when we get closer to opening,” he added.

Activities like the popular Monday night trivia challenge will be carried over to the Davis location as well.

The décor will be similar, as family friends in Ireland will once again be designing the interior space.

“This whole pub was built in Ireland then broken down and shipped over here,” Henry de Vere White said Monday in the Sacramento pub. “All the decorations on the walls are replicas of family items from Ireland.”

Authenticity is important to the brothers, with Simon being born in Ireland and Henry being born in Boston – the first one born in America from a family that traces its Irish heritage back to the year 1140.

The brothers have been living in Sacramento since 1985.

“In here, we have high ceilings, but in Davis, the ceilings are much lower,” Henry de Vere White said. “This is typical of a Victorian pub in downtown Dublin, but the Davis one will have more of a neighborhood feel.”

Philippe Masoud is the owner of two restaurants with locations in both Sacramento and Davis – Crepeville and Burgers and Brew. He said he expects the pub to be successful as well, since the same types of places appeal to both cities.

“Davis is a really good town for us. Sacramento took us longer to be discovered,” he said, adding that he opened his businesses in Davis first.

One challenge to doing business in Davis that Sacramento doesn’t face, however, is that business slows down considerably in summer, when the college students are on break, he said.

But that can be overcome, he said, adding, “I think they will do really good.”

For more information on de Vere’s Irish Pub in Davis, check the pub’sFacebook page or follow it on Twitter."

Brandon Darnell is a staff reporter for The Sacramento Press.

 

Bulleit

Bulleit Bulleit Bourbon is made by following the small-batch technique inspired by Augustus Bulleit over 150 years ago. Only the highest quality ingredients are used. Bulleit Bourbon’s subtlety and complexity stem from its unique blend of rye, corn and barley malt, along with special strains of yeast. Because Bulleit Bourbon is especially high in rye content, it has a bold and spicy character with a distinctively smooth, clean finish.

The hints of oak and spice, the russet color, the crisp, clean flavor that feels smooth in the throat, the notes of vanilla and honey – all add up to a bourbon that has a distinct and individual character. The complex taste of Bulleit Bourbon is something that can only be appreciated once tried.

Bulleit Bourbon is an American brand of straight bourbon whiskey characterized by its high rye content at approximately 30%, the absence of phenol and aging of at least six years.[1] The design of the flask is reminiscent of an old-fashioned brown medicine flask with raised lettering and a cork stopper. The bourbon is 45% alcohol by volume, or 90 proof in most countries, in 2008 however, in Australia, Bulleit Bourbon is now imported at 40% and bottled in the UK, rather than in the US. This change has also been marked by the label on the bottle no longer being applied diagonally, but horizontally, as pictured, and also a change in the manufacture of the actual glass bottle. The new bottle design is screw top as opposed to plastic mounted cork, and the bottle lettering is raised higher and its bottle manufacture is generally lower quality, but will only be seen in the UK bottling (40%) export markets. Bulleit sold on the UK market, presently (after this change in bottling location) is presumably also 40% alcohol by volume, not 45%.

History:

According to company lore, the first batch of Bulleit was first made in the 1800s by Augustus Bulleit, but discontinued after his death. In 1987, the great-great-grandson of the original creator, Tom Bulleit created the first modern-day batch, which was introduced to US markets in 1999, and Australia, UK and Germany in 2000.[2][3] In 1997 Bulleit was bought by Seagram, and is now distilled in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky.[4] Following an acquisition of Seagram, the Bulleit brand is now owned by Diageo.

You can try this Whiskey at  de Vere's Pub in downtown Sacramento.

GET MORE PUB UPDATES HERE:

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube Visit our blog View our profile on LinkedIn

 

A toast of whiskey

A toast of whiskey

Author: Chris Macias
Published: March 16th, 2011 02:09 PM

"A pint of Guinness sounds good for St. Patrick's Day, but this year we're ready to give a little Irish whiskey a spin. In the world of spirits, Irish whiskey's known for being exceptionally smooth compared to its counterparts around the world.

In Ireland, the majority of whiskeys are distilled three times during production, making for a clean and delicately sweet drink that goes down easy before yelling "Erin go bragh."

Whiskey's been produced in Ireland for centuries, and the country was home at one point to more than 1,000 distilleries. That number has been reduced to just a handful in Ireland today, but they still produce a range of whiskey styles from such brands as Bushmills, Jameson and Redbreast.

To get a head start on St. Patrick's Day, we're here at de Vere's Irish Pub, where the TVs broadcast a Champions League soccer match with Barcelona vs. Arsenal.

De Vere's carries 32 different Irish whiskeys, from smoky peat whiskeys to a bottle of Tyrconnell that's been aged in sherry casks. De Vere's even hosts its own whiskey society to introduce enthusiasts to the diversity found in this spirit.

"We get a lot of people who started as wine drinkers and then found something new they liked learning about," said co-owner Simon de Vere White.

"In an Irish whiskey, you'll be looking for something that's well-balanced with a little heat and some spice. It'll have less of the caramel and vanilla flavors that you'll find in American whiskey and bourbon."

So where to start with Irish whiskey? Well, make your first decision one that could save your life. If drinking away from home, designate a driver or keep a taxi service's number on hand.

St. Patrick's Day ranks as one of the most dangerous days on the road due to alcohol consumption. According to the CHP, a total of five people were killed and 142 people injured in 240 alcohol-involved collisions statewide on St. Patrick's Day in 2009 and 2010.

After you've checked this off your list, Liquid Assets recommends you check out these three Irish whiskeys on St. Patrick's Day and beyond:

Slane Castle Irish Whiskey (roughly $30 for 750 ml bottle, $7-$10 per shot at bars): De Vere White likes to start newcomers with this smooth and cask-y spirit that's been aged in American bourbon barrels. This whiskey definitely carries a little kick and a spicy finish, but paired with a smooth and balanced mouthfeel, just like a proper Irish whiskey should.

Connemara Peated Single Malt Irish Whiskey (about $40 for a 750 ml bottle in stores, $7-$10 per shot at bars): Here's a tasty example of a peated whiskey, which uses grains that have been roasted over a peat fire. The result is a smoky and earthy drink that's something like the whiskey equivalent of a fine cigar. Look for an exceptionally long finish with a bit of sweetness and spice mixed in with that smoky character.

Redbreast 12-year-old Pure Pot Still Irish Whiskey (roughly $40 per 750 ml bottle in stores, $9 to $11 per shot at bars): Take a sip of this full-bodied yet impeccably balanced whiskey and you'll see why it was named "Whiskey of the Year" by "Whisky Bible" author Jim Murray.

Full of complexity, with flavors of sweet caramel, spice and a touch of sherry, this whiskey is one to sip and savor."

Click here to find out more!

Original Article

ST. BALDRICK'S DAY TO DRUM UP SMILES AND CHILDHOOD CANCER RESEARCH FUNDING

Each year, 160,000 children are diagnosed with cancer, which is the leading cause of death for youngsters in the US and Canada. At 5pm on March 14, 2011 at deVere's Irish Pub, teams of brave and caring souls will bare their domes in an annual head-shaving, fund raising, philanthropic event that, since its advent, has generated over 56 million dollars to help kids fight and prevent cancer.